Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket


FREE worldwide shipping for orders over £150

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

AMAZING VALUE SPECIAL OFFERS !

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
 
Product Search        
Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints, many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS and all orders over £150 get FREE WORLDWIDE SHIPPING!
Many of our offers end in 23 hours, 48 minutes!
THE BIG SALE ... THE BIG SALE ... THE BIG SALE ... THE BIG SALE ... THE BIG SALE

Ensign of the 17th regiment of Foot, American War of Independence 1779. by Jim Lancia.


Ensign of the 17th regiment of Foot, American War of Independence 1779. by Jim Lancia.

Item Code : DHM0598Ensign of the 17th regiment of Foot, American War of Independence 1779. by Jim Lancia. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print. Image size 12 inches x 17 inches (31cm x 43cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £20.00

Quantity:
THE BIG SALE ... THE BIG SALE ... THE BIG SALE ... THE BIG SALE ... THE BIG SALE
THIS PRINT IS HALF PRICE!
For a short time, this item is being offered at half of its normal price.
We have many thousands of items like this across our website, offering great value to our customers.
Items included in the offer are changed frequently.
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Ensign of the 17th regiment of Foot, American War of Independence 1779. by Jim Lancia DHM0598
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting by Jim Lancia. Image size 12 inches x 18 inches (31cm x 46cm)none£500 Off!Now : £1600.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


Extra Details : Ensign of the 17th regiment of Foot, American War of Independence 1779. by Jim Lancia.
About all editions :

Detail Images :



Artist Details : Jim Lancia
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Jim Lancia

Jim Lancia

Jim Lancia. American historical artist, who has produced a superb range of military small group uniform and portrait scenes, of some of the most dramatic periods in history. Jim Lancia was influenced by some of the great French artists such as Detaille and during the late 1980s produced a series of French Napoleonic scenes which are superb and accurate. Mostly French cavalry regiments caught Jims focus. Due to this superb range of prints, Cranston Fine Arts commisisoned Jim Lancia during the late 1990s to produce a range of American Civil War and Russian Napoleonic scenes. These low cost art prints are available direct form this website as well as newly available original military paintings.

More about Jim Lancia

This Week's Half Price Art

 Edward departs from his almost completed Rhuddlan Castle at the conclusion of his second Welsh campaign.

Edward the 1st in Wales by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1600.00
 Last stand of the 24th South Wales Borderers at Isandhlwana during the Zulu War. The battle of Isandhlwana, a Zulu victory over the British forces on 22nd January 1879 about 100km north of Durban. Lord Chelmsford led a column of forces to seek out the Zulu army camped at Isandhlwana, while patrols searched the district. After receiving a report, Chelmsford set forth at half strength, leaving six companies of the 24th Regiment, two guns, some Colonial Volunteers and a native contingent (in all about 1,800 troops) at the camp. Later that morning an advanced post warned of an approaching Zulu army. Shortly after this, thousands of Zulus were found hidden in a ravine by a mounted patrol but as the patrol set off to warn the camp, the Zulus followed. At the orders of the Camp Commander, troops spread out around the perimeter of the camp, but the Zulu army broke through their defences. The native contingent who fled during the attack were hunted down and killed. The remaining troops of the 24th Regiment, 534 soldiers and 21 officers, were killed where they fought. The Zulus left no one alive, taking no prisoners and leaving no wounded or missing. About 300 Africans and 50 Europeans escaped the attack. Consequently, the invasion of Zulu country was delayed while reinforcements arrived from Britain.

Battle of Isandhlwana, 22nd January 1879 by Brian Palmer. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Napoleon enters Cairo, on the 22nd July 1798 after his victory against the Egyptian army at the Battle of the pyramids on July 21st.   Napoleon with an army of 36,000 seized Malta on the 10th of June 1798 form the Knights of St John then sailed on to land wets of Alexandria on July 1st.  They seized Alexandria form the Mameluke ruler Ibrahim who fled into Syria. But the Mameluke military Commander Murad Bey was determined to stop napoleon entering cairo  so blocked the French advance at Embabeh on the left bank of the Nile near the pyramids. Under his command he had 40,000 troops but only 6,000 of these were the fierce fighting force of Mamelukes.  On July 21st napoleon moved onto the Egyptian positions and Murad launched an all out attack with his cavalry. but the 6,000 Mamelukes were no match for the French Infantry and Artillery which fired volley after volley. which devastated the Mamelukes, when the charge had failed the disorganized Egyptian Infantry fled.  With only 300 casualties napoleon marched onto Cairo.
Napoleons Entry into Cairo by Gustave Bourgain. (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
Alexander the Greats Victory at Hydaspes River    During the Macedonian conquests in 326BC at the tributary at Hydaspes (now Jhelem) of the Indus River, King Porus and his Indian army blocked Alexander the Greats advance with some 50,000 troops leaving 40,000, the bulk of his army, on the west bank of the river. Alexander the Great crossed the Indus river using makeshift pontoons with 14,000 picked cavalry and infantry. The following day he attacked the flank of King Porus position, after 8 hours of hard fighting, Alexander the Greats army routed the Indians, taking 9,000 prisoner including King Porus and killing 12,000. The Macedonian army lost 980 men and this was the last battle of the Asian conquest as Alexanders army rebelled and refused to go further.

Alexander the Greats Victory at Hydaspes River by Brian Palmer (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

 9th Hussars of Napoleons Army of 1806.

An Affair of Outposts by J P Beadle (Y)
Half Price! - £33.00
After Oliver Cromwells success  at the Battle fo Marston Moor, York surrendered to the Parliamentarians, which gave them control over the North.
The Surrender of York to the Roundheads, by Ernest Crofts.
Half Price! - £33.00
In 1857, during the Indian Mutiny, the 5th (Northumberland) (Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot was part of Major-General James Outram's little force which fought its way to Cawnpore, where the haggard remnants of Major-General Sir Henry Havelock's regiments had been besieged by the mutineers.  Then together, their combined force marched on 21st September, in a deluge of rain, to attempt the relief of Lucknow.  They fought their way across a flooded landscape towards the Alam Bagh, the Prince of Oudh's garden palace, where 12,000 of the enemy barred the way, with their cannon commanding the road.  The Alam Bagh was a very large enclosure, with a wall all around it.  At each of the four corners of the wall was a two-storeyed tower.  There was a gateway in the centre of each side of the wall.  In the centre of the enclosure was a palace, the Bara Dari.  On 23rd September, the British force advanced and drove the sepoys from their position.  The 5th Regiment, on the right, with the 78th Highlanders cleared the enemy from the Alam Bagh, and the British entered the enclosure.  All night it rained.  For three days Havelock's men had marched and fought in a downpour, and on the 24th he let them rest.  A reconnoitring party, under Lieutenant Brown, went forward from the Alam Bagh in skirmishing order, till they came under a heavy fire.  The sepoys closed in on the little party, as the British withdrew in good order.  Private E. Deveney had his leg carried away by a cannon-ball.  Brown ran back to him, followed by Corporal Grant.  Under a heavy fire they brought him safely to the Alam Bagh.  For this deed Corporal Grant was later awarded the Victoria Cross.  Next morning was dull and grey, the country a sea of mud.  Leaving 6 officers and 300 men at the Alam Bagh, the little British force advanced the last few miles to fight its way through the streets against tremendous odds, and into the besieged Residency at Lucknow.  The 5th Fusiliers were wearing white smock frocks and trousers.  White covers and neck curtains were also made for their forage caps, to which were affixed peaks removed from their unused shakos.  They were armed with the new Enfield rifles.  Officers in this campaign dressed how they pleased, and I have depicted Lieut. Brown wearing his red shell jacket.  In the background is the Alambagh.
Corporal Robert Grant VC and Lt Brown, 5th (Northumberland) Fusiliers Saving Pte Deveney, Returning Towards the Alambach, Lucknow after a reconnaissance 25th Sept. 1857 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Shows the French Cuirassiers of the 2nd Empire of Napoleon the 3rd.

Le Drapeau by Edouard Detaille. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket