Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over 220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

Product Search        

The Charge by Alphonse de Neuville.


The Charge by Alphonse de Neuville.

French Dragoons charge a Prussian position during the Franco Prussian war.
Item Code : DHM0392The Charge by Alphonse de Neuville. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print.

Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : 25.00

Quantity:
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR DISCOUNT DOUBLE PRINT PACKS!

Buy With :
La Defence de la Longbayau by Alphonse De Neuville.
for 66 -
Save 34
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : The Charge by Alphonse de Neuville DHM0392
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!14.00VIEW EDITION...
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Open edition print. (Two copies in near perfect condition)

Ex display prints in near perfect condition.
Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)none31.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


Artist Details : Alphonse de Neuville
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Alphonse de Neuville

Alphonse de Neuville

The son of a banker, Alphonse was born in Saint Omer, Normandy, on the last day of May, 1836. As a youngster, he yearned to be a soldier but his family insisted that he study law. Although he completed his law degree in 1857, he showed more interest in art and approached Adolphe Yvon and Hipployte Bellange about his idea but both discouraged him so he entered the studio of Francois-Eduard Picot where he started work with another pupil and future military artist, Berne-Bellecour. The great painter Delacroix also took the young painter under his wing. In 1859, the artist showed his first military painting at the Salon. The Fifth Battalion of Chasseurs at the Gervais Battery, Malahoff for which he won a medal. A commission to paint Garibaldi taking Naples was received the following year and de Neuville went to the place to sketch first-hand. While there he witnessed the siege at Capou. He received a second-class medal for another painting of the Crimean War shortly after. Throughout the 1860s he busied himself with various large canvases depicting events from the Crimean War and Italian War of 1859, but it was to the events of the war with Prussia in 1870-71 that De Neuville was to gain his reputation as a painter of the 'incident' rather than the event. At the age of 35, the artist found himself as an officer of auxiliary sappers near Paris, and participated in the battles at Le Bourget and Champigny. These experiences enabled him to embark on a series of remarkable paintings chronicling the suffering of the French soldiers in the war. In 1872 appeared The Bivouac before Le Bourget but it was his picture of the following year, The Last Cartridge which really brought his name to prominence among the art critics of Paris. In this powerful and pathetic picture, a small group of French chasseurs await their fate in the upper room of a shot-riddled house having exhausted their ammunition. To achieve the reality of the moment, the artist painted the scene in a room which had been riddled with bullets and wreaked of powder. His 1875 piece entitled Attack by fire upon a barricaded house at Villersexel was regarded by many as his finest picture to date, but this was soon overshadowed by the immensely popular Le Bourget painted in 1878 showing a few French soldiers filing out of a church into the arms of the victorious Prussians. During the next few years, his reputation before him, he found employment in England with the Fine Art Society painting scenes from the various colonial campaigns in Zululand and Egypt resulting in his pictures of Rorke's Drift and Tel-el-Kebir but he soon returned to the subject he was most at home with, the war of 1870. Pictures for the 1880s include the famous Cemetery of St Privat and two panoramas of the battles at Champigny and Rezonville painted with his pupil, Edouard Detaille. His premature death at the age of 49 in May 1885 shocked the art world but his numerous pictures were a lasting testament to his greatness and sensitiveness to the sufferings of the common soldier.

More about Alphonse de Neuville

This Week's Half Price Art

 Depicts two Irish peasants in traditional dress being marched through a Kerry glen by a recruiting party of the 88th Regiment (Connaught Rangers)

Listed for the Connaught Rangers by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)
Half Price! - 25.00
 On the night of 6th April 1812 Wellingtons Army, surrounding the walled Spanish town of Badajoz (garrisoned by Napoleons soldiers under general Baron Philippon) is ready to attack! The men of the 45th regiment from Pictons 3rd Division launch themselves in a desperate and bloody assault against the north castle wall. Carrying improvised ladders, the men have their top buttons undone, overalls rolled up and are stripped for action. The castles defenders (Germans, allied to Napoleon of the Graf und Erbprinz Regiment from Hesse-Darmstadt) partroling the walls in their greatcoats are intially surprised by the bold assault from this sector but they have been preparing the strong defenses for some time. Soon the night air is full of musketry, falling masonry, burning bundles of ropes and exploding grenades or mines. Despite the horrific casualties suffered the attackers press home. As the first scaling ladders are raised near a small bell tower the young Lt. James Macpherson reaches for the top of the wall. The ladders are too short! Undaunted he cries to his men below to lift the base of the ladder closer to the wall. This rapid, vertical movement suddenly propels him to a height several feet above the Germans heads. A shot rings out as one of the defenders fires point blank into the young mans chest. Fortunately the lead ball only strikes a glancing blow, cleaving in two a button of the officers waist coat and dislocating one of his ribs. Despite his fortunate escape, the force of the impact nearly sends him tumbling from the ladder. Somehow he maintains his grasp but the ladder itself gives way under the weight of the men following. Some unfortunates are impaled on the bayonets of their comrades below. Leaping from the rungs of another ladder, Corporal Kelly is the first man over the top and gradually the 45th gain a foothold on the ramparts. The rest of the regiment is ordered to unfix bayonets. Using the few remaining ladders, others also manage to scale the walls. Through the carnage they climb, club and shoot their way into the castle itself! Maepherson now regains consciousness at the foot of the wall and revived with a cup of coco from his friend A.A. General Hercules Packenham, who was directly behind him on the ladder when it broke. Though winded by the shot he rises to his feet. This sudden movement relocates his rib and he is able to climb the ladders once more. Once over the defense he sees the old towers of Apendez and Albar-rana to his left and the cathedral illuminated by gun fire in the distance. However his objective is directly ahead. Atop the abandoned tower of Santa Maria before him still flies the French tricolour. Macplierson seizes the opportunity, mounts the spiral stairway to the top turret and pulls down the enemy flag. For want of a substitute he flies his own red jacket from the pole, signifying that the castle has fallen. In the rest of the town the fighting continues and turns into a blood lust. Badajoz is one of the bloodiest and violent sieges of the Peninsula War. On the following day Maepherson presents his trophy to the Duke of Wellington himself but his bravery is not rewarded with a promotion.

Badajoz by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - 50.00
MARK5. Original Oil Study of Officer Skinners Horse painting by Mark Churms.
Original Oil Study of Officer Skinners Horse painting by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - 300.00
This is my personal interpretation of the events immediately following the Battle of Culloden. There is no intention to depict either the shores of LochNam-Uarnh, the Highlands, glens or castles with geographic accuracy. Instead I have tried to portray the scenes following the first 3 days of the battle, the escape of Bonnie Prince Charlie, the destruction and brutality wreaked upon the Highlands and the real sufferers, women and the innocent. 1 . The battlefield scene represents the time from plundering and butchering the wounded to when the ordinary people were allowed on to collect their dead. In the main central figure I have tried to impart a feeling of stoic dignity in the face of an uncertain future 2. The top section represents the form of Prince Charles. Despite the flames and carnage of Culloden, he is firmly supported in the hand of his Jacobite faithful to his safe exile aboard a French warship. Being mindfull that Clan tartans were not in common usage as uniforms of war at the time, only one tartan has been represented as such, that of the Royal Stewart, and that only to signify Charles claim to the thrones of England and Scotland. With his leaving, the sett fades as does he and his ambition. The burning, smouldering tartans signify the proscription of tartans, kilts, plaids etc by Westminster to discourage further rebellion. 3. With the Clans and their regiments broken, neither the natural barrier of the Highlands nor the great chiefs castles would prevent the poison of Culloden seeping into every glen or the fury of Cumberlands dragoons plundering at will. This is represented in the lower section. Armed with sword, manacles and the noose, these, Cumberlands most pitiless embarked on an orgy of murder, rape and pillage. The abyss of prison or exile awaited those suspected of Jacobite sympathies, the gallows for more serious resistance. Battles are fought and won, or lost, as all battles are, but Cullodens aftermath changed Scottish Highland society forever, ushering in a long period of suffering. This painting is my humble attempt to interpret that tragic period.

Culloden the Aftermath by Brian Wood (GL)
Half Price! - 370.00

DHM598P.  Ensign of the 17th regiment of Foot, American War of Independence 1779. by Jim Lancia.

Ensign of the 17th regiment of Foot, American War of Independence 1779. by Jim Lancia (P)
Half Price! - 1050.00
 The garrison under the command of Major G Baring consisted of the 2nd Light Battalion of the 2nd Brigade Kings German Legion and reinforced by two Nassau companies. Here Major Baring is seen leading his Legion against Quiots Brigade (54th and 55th of the line)

The Defence of La Haye-Sainte, 18th June 1815 by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - 50.00
 Sous-Lieutenant Ferdinand de la Riloisiere of 1st Regiment of Carabiniers, moments before he received a mortal wound, in the charge of the 2nd reserve cavalry Corps, against the reavski Redoubt. Despite his injury he survived for several days after the battle and was presented with the cross of the Legion of Honour only hours before his death.

La Moscowa, The Battle of Borodino, 7th September 1812 by Mark Churms. (B)
Half Price! - 40.00
DHM691.  Sir Walter Raleigh by Chris Collingwood.

Sir Walter Raleigh by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - 35.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket