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The Charge of the 19th Light Dragoons at Assaye by David Rowlands.


The Charge of the 19th Light Dragoons at Assaye by David Rowlands.

Battle of Assaye 23rd September 1803. Governor General Lord Richard Wellesley ordered his younger Brother General Arthur Wellesley (Later to become Duke of Wellington) to command a British and native force of 4,500 men to the South -Central part of the Peninsula. (At thr same time He also Sent General Gerard Lake to the north of India, see Battle fo Laswarree for further details) General Arthur Wellesley, met a much larger Maratha Force of some 26,000 strong at Assaye in Hydrabad. on September 23rd 1803. The Battle of Assaye became one of the bloodiest battle Arthur Wellesley fought, receiving 1500 casualties out of a force of 4,500. But the Maratha were routed and Assaye was a British Victory.
Item Code : DHM0355The Charge of the 19th Light Dragoons at Assaye by David Rowlands. - This Edition
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PRINTSigned open edition print.

Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)Artist : David Rowlands£25 Off!
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FREE PRINT : Light Dragoons Serving in the East Indies.

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The 74th Highlanders at the Battle of Assaye, 23rd September 1803 by David Rowlands.
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Other editions of this item : The Charge of the 19th Light Dragoons at Assaye by David Rowlands DHM0355
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned open edition print. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)Artist : David RowlandsHalf Price!Now : £20.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTOpen edition print. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£14.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : David Rowlands
on separate certificate
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£500.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas printd. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : David Rowlands
on separate certificate
£100 Off!Now : £320.00VIEW EDITION...
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
Unsigned print. Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)none£50 Off!Now : £50.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :



Artist Details : David Rowlands
Click here for a full list of all artwork by David Rowlands


David Rowlands

David Rowlands has had a passion for sketching British soldiers and their equipment ever since he was a boy. After completing his studies at Manchester University in 1977, he joined the staff of the Reading Room at the National Army Museum, working full-time as a professional artist. Keenly interested in the history of British campaigns, uniforms and tactics, he has painted many historical battle scenes with great attention to accuracy and detail. This has resulted in widespread recognition of his work with the result that he has been commissioned to record the activities of many Regiments in the present day. These commissions have taken him frequently to Northern Ireland, as well as Germany, Cyprus, Hong Kong and Gibraltar. In 1991 David Rowlands was the only artist invited by the Army to visit the Gulf. Attached to a Warrior crew of 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, he observed the work of the various Arms at first hand, enabling him to complete many accurate paintings for Regiments and Corps engaged in the conflict. Early in 1993 he was the first war artist to visit Bosnia and record the British troops in Operation GRAPPLE 1. Invited by Headquarters National Support Element, he travelled extensively on convoys and sketched the operations from Split to Vitez and Travnik. Several paintings have been commissioned by the participating units, including one of 7 Armoured Workshop REME at Gornji Vakul. Over the past ten years David has been sent regularly to Iraq and Afghanistan for projects involving many of the British and Nato forces. He has probably spent as much time overseas gathering information for these projects as he has spent in the UK. He is certainly one of the major military artists of the past 20 years. Many of these fine paintings are now available as signed edtion art prints and canvases.

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