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The Battle of Minden, 1st August 1759 by David Rowlands. (C)


The Battle of Minden, 1st August 1759 by David Rowlands. (C)

Captain F Macbeans Company, 1st Battalion Royal Artillery in action on the right of the British line, firing its 12 pounder guns against French Cavalry and Infantry. By permission of David Rowlands. Battle of Minden 1st August 1759. Major battle of the Seven years war. After the French victory in April at Bergen, The French Army 60,000 strong under the command of Duc Louis de Contades marched northwards towards Hanover. To block this French Advance the Prussian Army under Field Marshall The Duke of Brunswick decided to hold the line at Minden. The Duke of Brunswick could only raise a force of 45,000 men including a British Contingent under Lord George Sackville of 6 regiments, a detachment of cavalry and some artillery. The French opened the battle attacking, the British Infantry regiments probably due to a misunderstanding, advanced and they were followed by the Hanoverian Infantry. They attacked the French cavalry. The Infantry advanced only stopping to let off a volleys of fire. This unconventional use of Infantry against cavalry, the French force confused and suffering losses broke. The victory was in Ferdinands grasp, he ordered his cavalry forward but the British general Sackville refused to send his cavalry after the French. For this action he was later court-martialled by King George II and cashiered from the army. The French were able to withdraw in order, but their losses had been 7,000 men and 43 artillery guns. The British and Hanoverian losses were less than 3,000 with 1500 of these casualties inflicted on the British Infantry. This battle ended all French hopes of capturing Hanover. British Regiments at Minden. 12th of Foot. (Suffolk Regiment) 20th Foot. (Lancashire Fusiliers ) 23rd of Foot. (Welch Fusiliers), 25th of Foot, (Kings own Scottish Borderers), 37th of Foot. (Royal Hampshire Regiment), 51st Foot (Kings own Yorkshire Light Infantry)
Item Code : DHM0353CThe Battle of Minden, 1st August 1759 by David Rowlands. (C) - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
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PRINTOpen edition print.

Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)none£14.00

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Other editions of this item : The Battle of Minden, 1st August 1759 by David Rowlands.DHM0353
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PRINTSigned special edition print. Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)Artist : David Rowlands£30 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £65.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)Artist : David Rowlands£60 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £95.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTSigned open edition print. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)Artist : David Rowlands£15 Off!Now : £22.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : David Rowlands
on separate certificate
Half Price!Now : £300.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : David Rowlands
on separate certificate
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£390.00VIEW EDITION...
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
Unsigned print.

One copy, ex-display print with slight damage to the white borders and two faint line marks, which would not be noticeable once framed.
Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)none£25.00VIEW EDITION...
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Signed special edition print. (2 copies reduced to clear)

Near perfect condition – may have some slight marks or scratches.
Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)Artist : David RowlandsHalf Price!Now : £40.00VIEW EDITION...
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Artist Details : David Rowlands
Click here for a full list of all artwork by David Rowlands


David Rowlands

David Rowlands has had a passion for sketching British soldiers and their equipment ever since he was a boy. After completing his studies at Manchester University in 1977, he joined the staff of the Reading Room at the National Army Museum, working full-time as a professional artist. Keenly interested in the history of British campaigns, uniforms and tactics, he has painted many historical battle scenes with great attention to accuracy and detail. This has resulted in widespread recognition of his work with the result that he has been commissioned to record the activities of many Regiments in the present day. These commissions have taken him frequently to Northern Ireland, as well as Germany, Cyprus, Hong Kong and Gibraltar. In 1991 David Rowlands was the only artist invited by the Army to visit the Gulf. Attached to a Warrior crew of 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, he observed the work of the various Arms at first hand, enabling him to complete many accurate paintings for Regiments and Corps engaged in the conflict. Early in 1993 he was the first war artist to visit Bosnia and record the British troops in Operation GRAPPLE 1. Invited by Headquarters National Support Element, he travelled extensively on convoys and sketched the operations from Split to Vitez and Travnik. Several paintings have been commissioned by the participating units, including one of 7 Armoured Workshop REME at Gornji Vakul. Over the past ten years David has been sent regularly to Iraq and Afghanistan for projects involving many of the British and Nato forces. He has probably spent as much time overseas gathering information for these projects as he has spent in the UK. He is certainly one of the major military artists of the past 20 years. Many of these fine paintings are now available as signed edtion art prints and canvases.

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