Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over 220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

AMAZING VALUE SPECIAL OFFERS !

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
 
Product Search        

Petit Poste de Grand Garde, Hussars of the 8th Regiment by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier.


Petit Poste de Grand Garde, Hussars of the 8th Regiment by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier.

A scouting party of the 8th regiment of Hussars in Napoleons First Empire army are seen resting their horses and in discussion.
Item Code : DHM0316Petit Poste de Grand Garde, Hussars of the 8th Regiment by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print.

Image size 23 inches x 16 inches (58cm x 41cm)none30 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : 45.00

Quantity:
EXCLUSIVE website offer from Cranston Fine Arts - FREE art print(s) supplied with the above item!


Exclusive Offer for Online Orders Only

FREE PRINT : The Hussars by Michael Angelo Hayes

This complimentary art print worth 14
(Size : 8 inches x 12 inches (20cm x 31cm))
has been specially chosen by Cranston Fine Arts to complement the above edition, and will be sent FREE with your order.

This item can be viewed or purchased separately in our shop, HERE


All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Petit Poste de Grand Garde, Hussars of the 8th Regiment by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier DHM0316
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!14.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :

Artist Details : Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier

Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier

Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier Born in Lyons on 20th February, 1813, he served for a short period in a chemist shop but his interest in art quickly became apparent to his parents who arranged for him to enter the studios of various artists. He first exhibited at the Salon in 1835 and became a regular exhibitor throughout the 1840's and 1850's showing various non-military scenes. However, these pictures were enough to establish his reputation and he was invited by Napoleon 111 to join the Imperial Staff on the expedition to Italy in 1859. Inspired by what he witnesses, Meissonier began to paint military scenes from the war such as The Emperor at Solferino, which was shown at the 1864 Salon, and The Emperor and his staff. Six years later, France went to war with Prussia and the emperor once again turned to Meissonier for his services. While initially accepting the offer, the artist soon became discouraged by the growing defeats of the army and declined to become further involved but not before narrowly escaping being besieged in Metz. It was at this time that he developed his penchant for Napoleonic subjects as a way of glorifying France's military past in the wake of the disastrous defeat in 1871 and the subsequent horrors of the Paris Commune. Inspired by the first Napoleon, Meissonier developed the idea of creating a cycle of pictures dramatising the great soldier from his rise to his fall. The five pictures would each depict a moment in the emperor's life during the years 1796, 1807, 1810, 1814 and 1815, but in fact only three canvases were finished. In his picture, 1807, the artist depicted a moment during the final phase of the battle of Friedland when the Emperor and his staff reviewed the 12th Regiment of Cuirassiers as they charged past. For 1814, he arranged for horses to be marched back and forth in snow and mud so that he could sketch - and became quite ill in the process. In the picture, a grim-faced Napoleon leads his disheveled troops in retreat to avoid confrontation with the enemy. These pictures established him as perhaps one of the greatest military painters France had ever seen and he was a major source of inspiration to Detaille and de Neuville before he died in Paris on 31st January, 1891.

More about Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier

This Week's Half Price Art

 Helmand Province, Afghanistan, April, 2011. Men of <i>The Highlanders</i> 4th Royal Regiment of Scotland, patrol through a flowering poppy field near Lashkar Gah.

Poppy Fields by David Pentland. (AP)
Half Price! - 85.00
 Icy rain adds its misery to the bitter conflict on Drumossie Moor. In the shadow of the Black Isle, two English ships on the waters of the Moray Firth, await the outcome of the decisive battle. Pounded by Cumberlands gunners and raked by steady musketry, the Princes brave men can make no headway. Although the Irish and French regulars refuse to give ground, the Jacobite lines gradually disintegrate. Tired, cold and hungry men flea past Culloden House for the relative safety of Inverness. On the Scottish right the Argyll Militia, supported by Hawleys Dragoons, tear down the walls of the Culwiniac and Culchunaig enclosures in an outflanking attack. Avochies men offer some resistance but Major Gillies McBean stands alone on the breach. He cuts down more than a dozen Argylls, including Lord Robert Kerr, who lies mortally wounded, but his foes are too many. The hero eventually falls to a vicious cut to the forehead, his thigh bone is also broken. Despite the cries of a mounted officer to save that brave man, the major is ruthlessly bayonetted, his back against the wall. The victory is complete and nothing more can be done. In the distance, the Young Pretender is forced to abandon the field and Scotlands hope of claiming the British Throne.

Battle of Culloden by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - 35.00
DHM386.  Charge of Donops Cavalry Led by Marshal Ney at Waterloo by Demoulin.
Charge of Donops Cavalry Led by Marshal Ney at Waterloo by Demoulin.
Half Price! - 25.00
 So Tell The Spartans, Stranger passing by that here, Obedient to their laws, we lie.   In 480 BC the Spartans tried to defend the pass at Thermopylae against the Persians led by Xerxes.  The Persian fleet had sailed along the coastline from northern Greece into the Gulf of Malia on the eastern Aegean Sea towards the mountains at Thermopylae. The Greek General and King Leonidas led the Greeks  and tried to defend the pass of Thermopylae.  All the defending Spartans were killed during the Battle of Thermopylae. Their defence and courage provided inspiration to the Greeks, and the following year the Greeks won battles against their old enemy the Persians.

Thermopylae 480BC, Spartan and Thespaian Hoplites. By Chris Collingwood. (GM)
Half Price! - 330.00

DHM229.  Crossing the Ford by H Bellange.
Crossing the Ford by H Bellange.
Half Price! - 30.00
 Battle of Prestonpans. Bonnie Prince Charlie, after landing at Glenfinnan, in his bid to gain the British Throne. Lord George Murray with an army of 2,000 Jacobites marched southward where they were meet at Prestonpans by General Sir John Cope and a Royal army of 3,000 men On the 21st September. The Jacobites charged the government troops and routed them. hundreds of Government troops were killed or wounded and over 1,000 were captured. with the Jacobite losses less than 150. With this victory Charles Edward Stuart and the Jacobite army marched southwards into England capturing the towns of Carlisle, Penrith, Lancaster and Preston and getting as far as Nottingham before lack of supplies and new recruits forced him to heads back to Scotland. Through the early morning Autumn mist, Highlanders of the Appin Regiment abandon their plaids and rush headlong across fields of stubble into the stunned ranks of Jonny Copes army. The force sent by the Crown to destroy the rebellion and capture the Pretender is itself utterly routed in a matter of minutes. The first major engagement of the uprising is a swift and complete victory for the Princes men. Except for the garrisons of Edinburgh, Stirling, Fort William and Fort Augustus, Scotland is now under the control of the Jacobites.

The Charge of the Highlanders at the Battle of Preston Pans, by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - 65.00
 After the unsuccessful march on London, Prince Charlie retreats to the safety of Scotland. The army regroups and more men come to join the cause, including soldiers from France. However King Georges men are never far away. As dark, winter rain clouds draw in over the high ground above the town of Falkirk, the Jacobite army assembles to face Hang-man Hawleys dragoons and infantry. A piper plays on while the men of Ogilvys Regiment, in the second line, load and make ready their weapons for the coming assault. Bonnie Prince Charlie (so called for his nature, not his looks) rides down the ranks followed by Lord Elcho and his Life Guards. Red coated Irish Pickets, regulars from France, are also in reserve.

The Jacobite Piper by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - 65.00
 Oberfeldwebel Albert Kerscher, commander of 2nd company 511 Heavy Tank Battalion aided by a Panzer IV, two Hetzers, a Kingtiger and a Pak gun, successfully defended against concerted Soviet air and armoured attacks, his action buying valuable time for the evacuation of German wounded from Pilau and scoring his 100th victory in the process.

Kerschers Defence of Neuhauser Forest by David Pentland. (AP)
Half Price! - 120.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket