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Southern Steel by Simon Smith (B)

Southern Steel by Simon Smith (B)

Confederate cavalry with the battle flag of the Confederacy gallop into battle. The battle flag was also known as the Southern Cross.
Item Code : DHM0278BSouthern Steel by Simon Smith (B) - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
PRINT300 signed prints.

Image size 16 inches x 23 inches (41cm x 58cm)Artist : Simon Smith£10 Off!Now : £70.00

All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

Other editions of this item : Southern Steel by Simon Smith.DHM0278
PRINTOpen edition print. Image size 16 inches x 23 inches (41cm x 58cm)noneHalf Price!Now : £35.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTOpen edition print. Image size 8 inches x 11 inches (20cm x 28cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£14.00VIEW EDITION...
Original painting by Simon Smith. Artist : Simon Smith£750 Off!Now : £3250.00VIEW EDITION...
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Extra Details : Southern Steel by Simon Smith (B)
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Artist Details : Simon Smith
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Simon Smith

Simon Smith

Simon Smith was born in 1960 into a military family and quickly developed an interest in history and the armed forces. He has worked continually as an illustrator in the historical field since leaving art college in 1982, having graduated with a First in Fine Art and Illustration.. He has work on permanent display in London and countries as far afield as Taiwan and Israel. Simon owes his lifelong interest in military subjects to his family connections with the services.

More about Simon Smith

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