Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!

Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!


Product Search        

92nd Highlanders at the Battle of Kandahar by Richard Caton Woodville.

92nd Highlanders at the Battle of Kandahar by Richard Caton Woodville.

The painting depicts the 92nd Highlanders (Gordon Highlanders) routing Ayub Khan tribesmen, on 31st August 1880, who had earlier on 26th July beaten the British at the battle of Maiwand and was now besieging the remainder of Primroses division in the citadel of Kandahar. Roberts with a force of 10,000 men (Gordon Highlanders, 60th Rifles, 72nd Highlanders, Sixth Gurka and Punjabi Infantry) marched out of Kabul to relieve Kandahar which was 300 miles away. The epic Battle of Kandahar made Roberts one of the great Victorian military heroes.
Item Code : DHM024592nd Highlanders at the Battle of Kandahar by Richard Caton Woodville. - This Edition
PRINTOpen edition print.

Image size 30 inches x 19 inches (76cm x 48cm)noneHalf

Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £40.00

EXCLUSIVE website offer from Cranston Fine Arts - FREE art print(s) supplied with the above item!

Exclusive Offer for Online Orders Only

FREE PRINT : Stragglers of the 66th (Berkshires) Coming In by Harry Payne.

This complimentary art print worth £14
(Size : 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm))
has been specially chosen by Cranston Fine Arts to complement the above edition, and will be sent FREE with your order.

This item can be viewed or purchased separately in our shop, HERE

For our Christmas sale, this item is being offered at half of its normal price.
We have many thousands of items like this across our website, offering great value to our customers.

Buy With :
Dargai by Robert Gibb.
for £70 -
Save £70
PACK039. 4 x Afghanistan Campaign military prints.

Pack price : £140 - Save £208

Buy With :
5 other prints in this pack :

Pack price : £140 - Save £208

Titles in this pack :
92nd Highlanders at the Battle of Kandahar by Richard Caton Woodville.  (View This Item)
Saving the Guns at the Battle of Maiwand by Richard Caton Woodville.  (View This Item)
Last Stand at Gundamuck by William Barnes Wollen.  (View This Item)
Remnants of an Army by Lady Elizabeth Butler.  (View This Item)
The Last Gallant Stand of the 66th Regiment at the Battle of Maiwand 27th July 1880 by Harry Payne  (View This Item)
Stragglers of the 66th (Berkshires) Coming In by Harry Payne.  (View This Item)

All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

Other editions of this item : 92nd Highlanders at the Battle of Kandahar by Richard Caton Woodville DHM0245
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 24 inches x 15 inches (61cm x 38cm)noneHalf Price!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £35.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTOpen edition print. Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£14.00VIEW EDITION...
**Open edition print. (2 prints reduced to clear)

Ex-display prints with some dents to border and image.
Image size 30 inches x 19 inches (76cm x 48cm)none£50 Off!Now : £30.00VIEW EDITION...
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£500.00VIEW EDITION...
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£390.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :

Artist Details : Richard Caton Woodville
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Richard Caton Woodville

Richard Caton Woodville

WOODVILLE, Richard Caton Born London 1856; died there 1927. Woodville was the most prolific battle artist of the nineteenth and early twentieth century in Britain, producing countless oil paintings and drawings, many for the Illustrated London News. As was the case with several history painters of the Victorian period, he studied at Dusseldorf sometime with Wilhelm Camphausen, the great German military painter, and later in Paris. He experienced was first-hand in Albania and Montenegro towards the end of the Russo-Turkish War in 1877, and later in Egypt during the war of 1882. During the latter conflict, he made numerous sketches and obtained photographs of the trenches at Tel-e-Kebir for his friend, the French military artist, Alphonse de Neuville (q.v.) who had been commissioned to paint a scene of the battle. The fruits of both their labours were shown at the Fine Art Society in 1883, Woodville, exhibiting The Moonlight Charge at Kassassin. In 1884, Woodville exhibited by Royal Command, another picture relating to the Egyptian War. The Guards at Tel-e-Kebir (Royal Collection). His first Royal Academy picture exhibited in 1879, was entitled Before Leuthen, Dec. 3rd, 1757. Thereafter, he was a frequent exhibitor at Burlington House, showing no less than 21 battle pictures, many dealing with contemporary events such as the Second Afghan War, Candahar (Private collection) and Maiwand; saving the Guns (Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool), the Zulu War - Prince Louis Napoleon in Zululand, and the Boer War - Lindley; Whitsunday 1900 (Oxfordshire Light Infantry Association), and Dawn of Majuba (Canadian Military Institute). He painted many historical recreations both in oil and water-colour including a series on famous British battles for the Illustrated London News. He depicted The Charge of the Light Brigade (Royal Collection, Madrid) and The Charge of the 21st Lancers at Omdurman (Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool), Blenheim, Badajos and several Waterloo pictures. During the Great War, he turned his talents to depicting the current events, three of which were exhibited at the Royal Academy. The 2nd Batt. Manchester Regiment taking six guns at dawn near St. Quentin (The Rings Regiment), Entry of the 5th Lancers into Mons (16th/5th Royal Lancers), and Halloween, 1914: Stand of the London Scottish on Messines Ridge (London Scottish Museum Trust) exhibited in the year of his death. During his life, he was the most popular artist of the genre and he was the subject of several articles in magazines and journals. He himself wrote some memoirs in 1914 entitled Random Recollections. He was deeply interested in the army and joined the Royal Berkshire Yeomanry Cavalry in 1879, staying with them until 1914 when he joined the National Reserve as a Captain.

More about Richard Caton Woodville

This Week's Half Price Art

VAR308.  Officer de Chasseur Cheval by Theodore Gericault.

Officer de Chasseur Cheval by Theodore Gericault.
Half Price! - £30.00
 Battle of Agincourt, October 25th 1415. Fought during the Hundred years war at the end of the English Invasion of 1415. King Henry the V of England, after his conquest of Harfleur marched his army of 1,000 Knights and 5,000 Archers (many of which were Welsh) towards Calais. He marched to Amiens as flooding had affected the river at the Somme which was the direct route. This delay helped the French army of 20,000 strong under the command of the Constable Charles dAlbret and Marshal Jean Bouciquaut II. The French army blocked Henry V route to Calais, giving the English no choice but to fight. Henry V positioned his army at Agincourt, between to wooded areas giving a frontage of 1100 metres. Henry deployed his force into three divisions; each group had archers at each flank. He had chosen his position well, in front of his army was ploughed fields and due to the heavy raid was very muddy. Due to the narrow battlefield area the French army lost their advantage of superior numbers. At 11 oclock the English started to advance their archers within 2509 yards of the French, getting them into range of the French lines. The French line of Cavalry advanced at a slow pass due to the heavy mud, They took heavy losses from the arrows from the English Long Bowman. They were eventually repulsed by the Archers who as the French cavalry approached changed from using longbows for axes and swords. The French second Cavalry line advanced only to be finally repulsed after hand to hand fighting. The commander Duc dAlencon was killed in the attack. The second charge had failed and many of the French knights were taken prisoner. Believing he had been attacked in the rear Henry V ordered that the prisoners were to be put to death. In fact There was no real rear attack it was French Camp followers plundering the English Camp. The French camp followers were quickly dealt with and the English again prepared itself for the next attack. The third attack never materialized as the sight of so much blood shed and piles of corpses turned the charge into a retreat. The English had won the day with losses less than 1600 compared to the French losses of over 7,000, including the capture of Bouciquaut. Henry V, his way now cleared reached Calais on the 16th November 1415. Agincourt is one of the great battles of military history, and this victory enabled Henry V to return to France in 1417 and conquer all of Normandy.

Morning of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
 Colditz - a forbidding medieval castle near Leiptzig, Germany - remains one of the most potent symbols of the Second World War. Reputed to be the Nazis most escape proof prison, this grim castle is the most notorious PoW camp in history with the distinction of being the only German prison that had more guards than prisoners. The castle was specifically used to impound incorrigible, Allied officers who had repeatedly escaped from other camps but putting so many experienced serial escapers in one place proved to be a rather questionable idea. Despite more conventional escape routes gradually being sealed off by the Germans, members of The Colditz Escape Academy continued to jump, tunnel and sneak out of this inescapable prison in surprising numbers. Early in the war Hermann Goering made a public declaration that Colditz was escape proof but he was to be proven wrong time and time again, and over 300 attempts were made during the course of the war, with more than 130 prisoners escaping and 31 successfully reaching home. When captured the result was three weeks in the solitary confinement block, however this didnt stop prisoners inventing even more elaborate means of escaping, even catapulting themselves out of high windows and of course the famous design and building of a sophisticated glider. This new edition, reproduced from a pencil drawing by Nicolas Trudgian, depicts the imposing castle shortly after being liberated by American troops in April 1945. In the foreground below a Sherman Tank of the 9th Armored Division stands on watch, close to the sign that was erected by the US 69th Infantry Division.
Colditz - Under New Management by Nicolas Trudgian.
Half Price! - £65.00
DHM424.  G Battery, Royal Horse Artillery, Waterloo 18th June 1815 by Major T.S. Seccombe.

G Battery, Royal Horse Artillery, Waterloo 18th June 1815 by Major T.S. Seccombe.
Half Price! - £30.00

 Replacements from 1st Battalion Irish Guards and Sherman tanks of the 46th Royal Tank Regiment move through the debris of Anzio town towards their jump-off positions for the Battle of Campoleone Station.

Anzio, Italy, February 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Depicts Dr. William Brydon, an assistant surgeon in the Bengal Army arriving at the gates of Jellabad on his exhausted and dying horse. He was thought to be the sole survivor of some 16,000 strong army and followers from Kabul, which was forced to retreat the 90 miles over snow covered passes to Jellabad during the first Aghan war. A few others eventually struggled through to the fort.

Remnants of an Army by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)
Half Price! - £35.00
 Private Thomas Brown of the 3rd kings own regiment of Dragoons, is knighted by King George the II, (The last reigning British Monarch to be at a Battle) Brown had recaptured the regimental guidon from the French during the battle

King George II Knighting Trooper Brown After the Battle of Dettingen by J P Beadle.
Half Price! - £30.00
 In the Spring of 1854 the Seventeenth lancers, the Death or Glory Boys, a nickname derived from the regiments dashingly sinister skull and crossbones badge received orders to make ready for the Crimea. The Seventeenth was to be brigaded with the 8th and 11th Hussars and the 4th and 13th Light dragoons to comprise what was said at the time to be The finest Brigade of Light cavalry ever to leave the shores of England. Prior to departure for the front. The seventeenth is reviewed by its Colonel in Chief, the Duke of Cambridge wearing scarlet full dress in contrast to the dark blue of the seventeenth. A bit of swagger before the Charge which would secure the regiments place in history.

Last Review Before the Charge by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - £60.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket