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The Battle of Waterloo, Charge of the Inniskillings by Orlando Norie.


The Battle of Waterloo, Charge of the Inniskillings by Orlando Norie.

Item Code : DHM0211The Battle of Waterloo, Charge of the Inniskillings by Orlando Norie. - This Edition
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PRINTOpen edition print. Image size 16 inches x 11 inches (41cm x 28cm)none£10 Off!Now : £30.00

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Other editions of this item : The Battle of Waterloo, Charge of the Inniskillings by Orlando Norie. DHM0211
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**Open edition print. (2 ex display copies reduced to clear) Image size 16 inches x 11 inches (41cm x 28cm)none£5 Off!Now : £35.00VIEW EDITION...
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Artist Details : Orlando Norie
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Orlando Norie

Orlando Norie

Orlando Norie was one of the most prolific painters of the British army in the 19th century. Orlando Norie painted over 5,300 paintings, mostly water colours. Orlando Norie was born in Belgium in Bruges on January 15, 1832 to Scottish parents and Norie spent most of his life painting in Dunkir, painting mostly for the British firm of Rudolf Ackermann. Orlando Norie's military paintings were first recognised in 1854 when his print of the Battle of the Alma (Crimean War) published by Ackermann was advertised. This military print edition was quickly followed by the prints of the Battle of Inkerman and the Battle of Balaclava. Many future paintings were made into prints by Ackermann and many of his paintings were exhibited in exhibitions, one of which was staged in 1873 featuring paintings of the Military Autumn Manoeuvres in Aldershot held in September and October 1871. Orlando Norie died in 1901 and is buried in the old cemetery in Aldershot adjacent to the Commonwealth War Cemetery. Many of his military water colours can be found in British regimental museums and clubs but some do appear for sale in auctiom houses, and indeed we do have the honour to offer a selection form time to time.

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