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D.H.2 versus Fokker by Michael Turner.

D.H.2 versus Fokker by Michael Turner.

The De Havilland 2 was designed in 1915, and first used by No.24 squadron RFC and used by three RFC Squadrons in France until June 1917. A Victoria Cross was won in a De Havilland 2 by Major Lionel Rees, commanding officer of 32 Squadron.
Item Code : DHM1469D.H.2 versus Fokker by Michael Turner. - This Edition
PRINT Open edition print.

Published in 1979. We have the last 50 prints of this edition which is sold out at the publisher.
Image size 11 inches x 9 inches (28cm x 23cm)none£18.00


Buy With :
Major Arthur Coningham by Ivan Berryman. (B)
for £61 -
Save £15

Buy With :
Fairey IIID by Michael Turner.
for £30 -
Save £4
Michael Turner Aviation Art Print Pack.

Pack price : £51 - Save £15

Buy With :
3 other prints in this pack :

Pack price : £51 - Save £15

Titles in this pack :
Hawker Horsley by Michael Turner.  (View This Item)
Hawker Harts by Michael Turner.  (View This Item)
Fairey IIID by Michael Turner.  (View This Item)
D.H.2 versus Fokker by Michael Turner.  (View This Item)

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The Aircraft :
DH2The De Havilland 2 was designed in 1915, and first used by No.24 squadron RFC at Hounslow at the end of that year, Major Lanoe Hawker VC was in command of the squadron. The DH2 was used by three RFC Squadrons in France until June 1917. A Victoria Cross was won in a De Havilland 2 by Major Lionel Rees, commanding officer of 32 Squadron.
Artist Details : Michael Turner
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Turner

Michael Turner

Michael Turner is one of today's best known and highly regarded motorsport artists, establishing himself as part of the Grand Prix scene in the 1960s. His parallel career in the field of aviation art has seen him achieve similar success and he has been President of the Guild of Aviation Artists for the past 16 years. His paintings and prints are prized by collectors for their drama and atmosphere, combined with a technical accuracy that comes with a deep understanding of his subject matter.

More about Michael Turner

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