Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

 
Product Search        

D.H.2 versus Fokker by Michael Turner.


D.H.2 versus Fokker by Michael Turner.

The De Havilland 2 was designed in 1915, and first used by No.24 squadron RFC and used by three RFC Squadrons in France until June 1917. A Victoria Cross was won in a De Havilland 2 by Major Lionel Rees, commanding officer of 32 Squadron.
Item Code : DHM1469D.H.2 versus Fokker by Michael Turner. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print.

Published in 1979. We have the last 50 prints of this edition which is sold out at the publisher.
Image size 11 inches x 9 inches (28cm x 23cm)none£18.00

Quantity:
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR DISCOUNT DOUBLE PRINT PACKS!

Buy With :
Major Arthur Coningham by Ivan Berryman. (B)
for £61 -
Save £15

Buy With :
Fairey IIID by Michael Turner.
for £30 -
Save £4
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


The Aircraft :
NameInfo
DH2The De Havilland 2 was designed in 1915, and first used by No.24 squadron RFC at Hounslow at the end of that year, Major Lanoe Hawker VC was in command of the squadron. The DH2 was used by three RFC Squadrons in France until June 1917. A Victoria Cross was won in a De Havilland 2 by Major Lionel Rees, commanding officer of 32 Squadron.
Artist Details : Michael Turner
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Turner


Michael Turner

Michael Turner is one of today's best known and highly regarded motorsport artists, establishing himself as part of the Grand Prix scene in the 1960s. His parallel career in the field of aviation art has seen him achieve similar success and he has been President of the Guild of Aviation Artists for the past 16 years. His paintings and prints are prized by collectors for their drama and atmosphere, combined with a technical accuracy that comes with a deep understanding of his subject matter.

More about Michael Turner

This Week's Half Price Art

 Sqn Ldr Billy Drake is shown in Curtiss Kittyhawk Mk1a ET790 claiming a Ju87 Stuka  on the 31st of October 1942.  Sqn Ldr Drake commanded  112 Squadron flying Kittyhawks at Gambut on 24th May 1942.  He claimed a probable Bf109 on 6th June, another probable on  2nd July, destroyed a Bf109 on the 8th, damaged a Ju88 on the ground on the 19th, destroyed a Bf109 on the 24th, two Ju87s on  the 1st September†and another Bf109 on the 13th.  Drake shared a Ju87 and probably destroyed another on 1st October†1942, got a probable Bf109 on the 22nd, destroyed another on the 26th, an Me202 on the 27th, a Ju87 on the 31st, a Bf109 destroyed and another damaged on 5th†November, a Bf109 destroyed on the ground on the 11th, an He111 destroyed and a Bf109 damaged on the 15th, a Bf110 destroyed and another damaged on the 19th, an Me202 and a Bf109 destroyed on 11th December and he finally shared a Bf109 on the 13th.  Drake was awarded a Bar to the DFC (28.7.42) and the DSO (4.12.42).

Tribute to Squadron Leader Billy Drake†by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
The B-17 Flying Fortress 'Memphis Belle' returns from one of her 25 mission over France and Germany.  Memphis Belle, a  B-17F-10-BO, USAAF Serial No.41-24485, was supplied to the USAAF on July 15th 1942, and delivered to the 91st Bomb Group in September 1942  at Dow Field, Bangor, Maine.  Memphis Belle deployed to Scotland at Prestwick on September 30th 1942 and went to RAF Kimbolton on October 1st, and then to her permanent base at Bassingbourn on October 14th.1942.  Memphis Belle was the first United States Army Air Force heavy bomber to complete 25 combat missions with her crew intact.  The aircraft and crew then returned to the United States to promote and sell war bonds.  The Memphis Belle B-17 is undergoing extensive restoration at the National Museum of the United States Air Force at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio.

Coming Home by Tim Fisher (AP)
Half Price! - £70.00
Our Gal Sal, a veteran of over a hundred ops, returning to base in the summer of 1944.  The peace of the  English country side is broken by the thunder of the mighty four engined bombers and keen observers will spot the rabbit scampering along the country lane as the Forts of the Bloody 100th circle the Airbase. With one engine feathered and showing signs of the gauntlet of Flak and fighters she has had to come through, the crew know they are only moments away from the safety of home.

The Veteran by Simon Smith.
Half Price! - £70.00
 A pair of Focke Wulf 190A4s of 9./JG2 Richthofen based at Vannes, France during February 1943. The nearest aircraft is that of Staffelkapitan Siegfried Schnell. The badge on the nose is the rooster emblem of III./JG2 and the decoration on Schnells rudder shows 70 of his eventual total of 93 kills.

Looking for Business by Ivan Berryman. (E)
Half Price! - £110.00

Dakota G-AMPZ (formerly KN442) of Air Atlantique resplendent in the commemorative livery of RAF Transport Command heads out across the English coast, back to Berlin?  Still flying more than 50 years after serving valiantly on the Berlin Airlift, this aircraft carries out the bulk of the airlines passenger charters.  These prints are signed by the current crew.
Perpetual Motion II by Robert Tomlin.
Half Price! - £55.00
 Fw190A-4/U8 night bomber variant of SKG.10.

Focke Wulf Fw190A-4/U8†by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £70.00
B129.  Concorde over Manhattan by Ivan Berryman.

Concorde over Manhattan by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
 Even the most faithful of Messerschmitt Me 109 pilots that also flew the Focke-Wulf Fw190 grudgingly admitted the well-proportioned and aesthetically pleasing Fw190 was the finest single-seat fighter in the Luftwaffes armoury during World War II. Soon after its arrival on the Channel Front in 1941, when initial bugs were ironed out, this superb fighter came close to fighter design perfection by the standards of the day. Just as the Mk IX Spitfire held the mantle as Britains most outstanding combat fighter of the war, so was the Fw190 regarded by experienced Luftwaffe pilots. Within months of its operational debut the Fw190 was causing widespread consternation among RAF pilots, the new fighter equal to the Mk IX Spitfire in all but its ability in the tightest of turning circles. By 1944 the technically superb Fw190 came into its own in the great air battles against the USAAFs massed daylight raids. The defence of the Reichs western airspace rested on the shoulders of a few Jagdgschwarden who, against steadily increasing odds, were tasked with interception and destruction of the attacking American heavy bombers. Flying alongside the two established Channel fighter wings JG2 Richthofen and JG26 Schlageter, equipped with Fw190s and led by the great fighter ace Oberst Walter Oesau, JG1 joined the battle in defence of northern Germany. Nicolas Trudgians painting Storm Chasers depicts the Fw190As of I./JG1, distinguished by their distinctive black and white striped cowls, scrambling from the snow-covered Dortmund airfield on 10 February 1944 to intercept another inbound American daylight raid. Nicks dramatic view of this technically supreme fighter conveys its true class as it hurtles over the airfield, its undercarriage retracting as the Fw190 accelerates into the climb. Below, sharing the airfield with I./JGI, are the Fw190s of the newly formed Sturmstaffel 1, identified by their black-white-black tail bands, seen taxiing out to join in the interception. Despite bad weather conditions the Luftwaffes defending fighters scored heavily that day, inflicting severe losses on the Americans, claiming 29 bombers and 8 fighters shot down in the action.

Storm Chasers by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Half Price! - £110.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket