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Fight for the Standard by Richard Ansdell.


Fight for the Standard by Richard Ansdell.

Depicting sergeant Ewart dispatching a French cavalryman on his way back with the Eagle and Standard captured from the French 45th Regiment of Foot.
Item Code : DHM0112Fight for the Standard by Richard Ansdell. - This Edition
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Capture of the French Eagle by Sgt Ewart by Sulliven.
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Other editions of this item : Fight for the Standard by Richard Ansdell. DHM0112
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**Open edition print. (2 ex display copies reduced to clear)

Ex display prints in near perfect condition.
Image size 15 inches x 23 inches (38cm x 58cm)noneHalf Price!Now : 25.00VIEW EDITION...
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Artist Details : Richard Ansdell
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Richard Ansdell

Richard Ansdell

Richard Ansdell was born in Liverpool, the son of Thomas Griffiths Ansdell, a freeman who worked at the Liverpool Dock, and Anne Jackson. His father died young and Richard went to the Bluecoat School for orphans. Richard had a natural talent for art from an early age, and after school went to Chatham Kent and became a portrait painter. In 1835 Richard Ansdell first exhibited at the Liverpool Academy. His animal and rural subjects proved to be popular and he soon attracted wealthy patrons and in 1840 Richard had his first exhibition at the Royal Academy in London. In June 1841, he married Maria Romer - and had 11 children. In 1847 the family left Liverpool to live in Kensingotn in London. In 1848 Richard Ansdell painted the magnificent Fight for the Standard (owned by the Royal Hoispital Chelsea). In 1855, Andsell was awarded a gold medal at the Paris Exhibitionwith the The Wolf Slayer and Taming the Drove. He also won the Heywood medal three times for his work at the Manchester Royal Institution. Richard Ansdell in 1861 was elected an Associate of the Royal Academy (ARA) and a Royal Academician (RA) in 1870. During part of his career he kept a summer house at Lytham St Annes, in the borough of Fylde, where a district, Ansdell, is named after him. He is the only English artist to have been honoured in this way. In April 1885 Richard Ansdell died at Collingwood Tower near Frimley, Surrey. He was buried at Brookwood Cemetery.

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