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Scots Regiments of the British Army by Richard Simkin.


Scots Regiments of the British Army by Richard Simkin.

Seaforth Highlanders, Royal Scots, Queens Own Cameron Highlanders, Cameronians, Black Watch, Highland Light Infantry, Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders, Royal Scots Fusiliers, Scots Guards, Gordon Highlanders, Kings Own Scottish Borderers.
Item Code : DHM0105Scots Regiments of the British Army by Richard Simkin. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
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Image size 23 inches x 10 inches (58cm x 25cm)none5 Off!Now : 32.00

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Irish Regiments in the British Army by Richard Simkin.
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Artist Details : Richard Simkin
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Richard Simkin

Richard Simkin

Born on November 5th 1850 and was born in Herne Bay Kent, England, Richard Simkin grew up in Aldershot, Hampshire, marrying his wife, Harriet, in 1880, and it is also believed he was a volunteer in the Artist's Rifles. He was employed by the War Office to design recruiting posters. He is probabaly best know for his series of Army regiments including Yeomanry and Colonial regiments, a weekly supplement print to the Army and Navy Gazette. In 1901 he created a series of 'Types of the Indian Army' for the Gazette. He obtained much of the information from the Colonial and India Exhibition of 1886. Over a period of over 50 years Richard Simkin produced thousands of watercolours of Army uniforms and watercolours of Army life and campaigns. Many of these paintings can be seen in regimental museums and messes. Simkin also contributed illustrations to The Army and Navy gazzette, the Boy's Own Magazine, and The Graphic and many paintings were used in books and publications of Raphael Tuck and Sons. Richard Simkin died on the 25th June 1926 at home at 7 Cavensigh Street, Herne Bay. Many of richard Simkin's antique prints have been reproduced as prints by Cranston Fine Arts and are available from our websites, along with many original antique prints which are hard to find these days.

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This Week's Half Price Art

 The Battle of Ulundi took place at the Zulu capital of Ulundi on 4th July 1879. Ulundi became the last battle to be fought during the Zulu war and the British victory finally broke the military power of the Zulu Nation. The battle began at 6 a.m. when Buller led out an advance guard of mounted troops and South African irregulars. The British force comprised of five companies of the 80th regiment in square in four ranks, with two Gatling Guns in the centres, two 9-pounders on the left flank and two 7-pounders on the right. The 90th Light Infantry with four companies of the 94th regiment made up the left face with two more 7-pounders. On the right face were the 1st Battalion of the 13th Light Infantry, four companies of the 58th Regiment, two 7-pounders and two 9-pounders. The rear face was composed of two companies of the 94th Regiment and two companies of the 2nd Battalion of the 21st Regiment. In the middle of the square were headquarters staff, No. 5 company of the Royal Engineers whhich was led by Lt John Chard who had commanded the troops at Rorkes Drift, the 2nd Native Natal Contingent, fifty wagons and carts with reserve ammunition and hospital wagons. Bullers horsemen protected the front and both flanks of the square. A rearguard of two squadrons of the 17th Lancers and a troop of Natal Native Horse followed. In total the British force stood at just over 5300 against the Zulu warrior regiments in total over 15000. The Zulu warriors charged again and again at the square but with the strong British firepower of tifle and gatling gun, they could not get close. As the Zulu warriors strength weakened, Lord Chelmsford ordered the cavalry to mount, and the 17th Lancers and the 1st Kings Dragoon Guards along with colonial cavalry were ordered to charge the now fleeing Zulus. The Zulus fled towards the high ground with the cavalry in pursuit. The Lancers were checked at the Mbilane stream by the fire of a concealed party of Zulus, causing a number casualties before the 17th Lancers overcame the Zulu resistance. The pursuit continued until not one living Zulu remained on the Mahlabatini plain, with members of the Natal Native Horse, Natal Native Contingent and Woods Irregulars slaughtering the Zulu wounded, done in revenge for the massacre at Isandlwana.

The Death or Glory Boys by Bud Bradshaw. (Y)
Half Price! - 100.00
Leading 30th Corps assault across the Seine at Vernon, 43rd Wessex Division gained an initial foothold on the east bank.  Heroic efforts however by the Royal Engineers of 71st, 72nd and 73rd Field Companies, succeeded in constructing a Class 9 Bailey bridge (David, shown left) and a Second Class 40 bridge (Goliath, shown right)  Despite constant enemy fire this amazing feat was achieved in only 2 days, and allowed 15/19th Hussars Cromwells and 4.7th Dragoons Guards Shermans to cross just in time to repulse a serious German counter attack by Tiger IIs of SS Panzer Abteilung 101.

David and Goliath, Vernon, France, 27th August 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
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Battle of Crecy.  One of the battles fought during the Hundred Years War, on 26th August 1346. On 12th July Edward III landed in Normandy with his army and marching north plundered the countryside. King Philip VI assembled an army to stop Edward and tracked them across the Somme River. When Edward reached Crecy he stopped and ordered his army to take up defensive positions. King Philip surveyed the English positions and decided to postpone his attack until August 27th. However, the French vanguard pressed forward too far and so committed the entire army to the battle. The hired Genoese crossbowmen began the assault but came under severe attack from the English longbows and so fled to the rear. King Philip then ordered his cavalry to charge resulting in a huge loss of horse and man under the barrage of arrows which rained down on them. By the end of the night after several unsuccessful assaults the French army was reduced by a third and King John of Luxemburg was dead. Edward then turned towards Calais.

The Black Prince Before the Battle of Crecy by Mark Churms.
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 Troops of the 1st Hampshires assaulting Gold Beach during the Normandy Landings. Gold beach was one of the British beaches on D-Day. Gold beach was the western most beach of the British beaches, on D-Day. Gold beach was between two twenty metre high cliffs where German fortifications had been built. The beach had been protected by concrete casemates which took some time to break through. This happened with support form British tanks in the afternoon of D-day 6th June. The British tanks and reinforcements moved off the beaches towards Saint-Come-de-Fresene and Arromanches which were both liberated by 9pm.

D-Day Gold Beach, 6th June 1944 by Simon Smith.
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9th (Irish) Field Battery firing on the Run-in-shoot to Queen Beach. They were the first rounds fired at the Normandy Coast, D-Day 6th June, 1944. Queen Beach, one of the 4 sectors of Sword Beach, where most of the landings of D-Day were carried out. The Queen Beach sector which extended for 1.5km between Lion-sur-Mer and the western edge of Ouistretham. The attack was thus concentrated on a narrow one-brigade front. For once the DD tanks and other armour came in exactly on time and ahead of the infantry. The 8th brigade, with the 1st Battalion of the South Lancashire Regiment on the right and the 2nd East Yorkshire on the left.

Operation Overlord by David Rowlands (B)
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 After a major victory at Salamanca (22 July 1812) Wellington occupied Madrid and then advanced to capture Burgos - unfortunately with insufficient siege equipment he was compelled to retire and forced to experience a harrowing retreat, it was, he said The worst scrape. However, when the campaigning season ended, Spain, south of the Tagus, was free of the French.

The Worst Scrape - Retreat from Burgos October/November 1812 by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - 50.00
 The year is 1807, the French Empire is at the pinnacle of its power. Although not yet 38 years of age the Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte is marching towards the heights of his military career. It is the anniversary of his great victory against the Austrians at Marengo seven years before. Since then the soldiers of The Grand Armee have faithfully followed The Little Corporal from victory to victory across Europe.  Now, in eastern Prussia, the Russians alone are holding out against the might of France. Bennigsens army is strung out on a four mile front along the banks of the river Alle, near the town of Friedland. With their backs to the unfordable river the brave Russian soldiers are drawn up in a poor position to give battle.  It is already midday when Napoleon arrives on the field. Much of the French force is still some miles away but the commanders keen eye immediately perceives an opportunity for victory. He decides to attack. The vigourous assault on the Russian lines commences at about 5.30 pm. Bennigsen, anticipating an engagement on the following day, is completely surprised by this ferocious attack so late in the afternoon. The fighting begins as his divisions are preparing to withdraw across the river Alle, to a stronger position. Napoleons master stroke throws the enemy into confusion. By 8.30 pm the French are masters of the field, the Russians have lost nearly a third of their army and 80 cannons. The town of Friedland is ablaze and the Tsars army in full retreat.  In simple attire and characteristically astride a nimble arab grey, Napoleon Bonaparte rides forward with his reserves of the Guard to survey the final victory.  Within a few days the defeated Tsar Alexander will embrace the French Emperor on a raft anchored in the middle of the Niemen at Tilsit. At their monumental meeting they will talk of peace, co-operation against the British, the division of Prussian Territories and France with Russia will form their uneasy alliance that will quickly collapse into open hostility and present Napoleon with his greatest challenge: The invasion of Russia itself.

Napoleon at Friedland by Mark Churms. (AP)
Half Price! - 95.00
<b>One ex-display print with slights damage to the border, and light dents and scratches which would be unnoticeable once framed.</b>
The Wounded Cuirassier by Theodore Gericault. (Y)
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