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The Iron Brigade During the Battle of Gettysburg, 1863 by Brian Palmer (P)


The Iron Brigade During the Battle of Gettysburg, 1863 by Brian Palmer (P)

The crack Iron Brigade of Brigadier General Wadsworths 1st Division of the army of the Potomac were the first Infantry unit to arrive on the field of Gettysburg in support of Brigadier General Bufords cavalry division who had stumbled upon General Lees advancing Army of North Virginia. The Brigade suffered 1,200 casualties out of 1800 engaged in the battle.
Item Code : DHM1037PThe Iron Brigade During the Battle of Gettysburg, 1863 by Brian Palmer (P) - This Edition
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ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting by Brian Palmer.

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Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Brian PalmerSOLD
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Other editions of this item : The Iron Brigade During the Battle of Gettysburg, 1863 by Brian Palmer.DHM1037
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : Brian Palmer20 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 80.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
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Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : Brian Palmer15 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 125.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Brian Palmer
on separate certificate
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!460.00VIEW EDITION...
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Artist Details : Brian Palmer
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Brian Palmer


Brian Palmer

Ever since Brian Palmer was a young boy his two main passions have been art and history, in particular military history. Between 1965 and 1969 Brian studied graphic design and illustration at Hornsey College of Art in London and for many years worked as a Designer / Illustrator, primarily in the music and publishing industries. Some years ago he began to work solely as a freelance illustrator, eventually concentrating exclusively on military paintings as a means of combining his two great loves. The substantial majority of Brian's paintings of the past 12 or so years have been commisisoned by Cranston Fine Arts, and signed limited edition art prints have been produced, covering many famous and not so famous periods of warfare. For Brian, one of the most important elements of a painting is research. Costume or uniform details, arms, geography and even weather conditions if known, can all combine to bring a realistic and accurate look to a piece of work. Brian has been influenced by many artists and illustrators over the years but his personal favourites within the military genre are Messionier, J.P. Beadle and Caton Woodville, and he has long been a great admirer of Vermeer, Carravagio and the Pre-Raphaelite movement. Cranston Fine Arts are very happy with the art work Brian has produced for them and have commissioned many new items to be shown over the coming years.

More about Brian Palmer

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