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The Iron Brigade During the Battle of Gettysburg, 1863 by Brian Palmer (P)


The Iron Brigade During the Battle of Gettysburg, 1863 by Brian Palmer (P)

The crack Iron Brigade of Brigadier General Wadsworths 1st Division of the army of the Potomac were the first Infantry unit to arrive on the field of Gettysburg in support of Brigadier General Bufords cavalry division who had stumbled upon General Lees advancing Army of North Virginia. The Brigade suffered 1,200 casualties out of 1800 engaged in the battle.
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Item Code : DHM1037PThe Iron Brigade During the Battle of Gettysburg, 1863 by Brian Palmer (P) - This Edition
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Other editions of this item : The Iron Brigade During the Battle of Gettysburg, 1863 by Brian Palmer.DHM1037
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : Brian PalmerHalf Price!Now : £60.00VIEW EDITION...
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Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : Brian Palmer£15 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £125.00VIEW EDITION...
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Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Brian Palmer
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Artist Details : Brian Palmer
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Brian Palmer


Brian Palmer

Ever since Brian Palmer was a young boy his two main passions have been art and history, in particular military history. Between 1965 and 1969 Brian studied graphic design and illustration at Hornsey College of Art in London and for many years worked as a Designer / Illustrator, primarily in the music and publishing industries. Some years ago he began to work solely as a freelance illustrator, eventually concentrating exclusively on military paintings as a means of combining his two great loves. The substantial majority of Brian's paintings of the past 12 or so years have been commisisoned by Cranston Fine Arts, and signed limited edition art prints have been produced, covering many famous and not so famous periods of warfare. For Brian, one of the most important elements of a painting is research. Costume or uniform details, arms, geography and even weather conditions if known, can all combine to bring a realistic and accurate look to a piece of work. Brian has been influenced by many artists and illustrators over the years but his personal favourites within the military genre are Messionier, J.P. Beadle and Caton Woodville, and he has long been a great admirer of Vermeer, Carravagio and the Pre-Raphaelite movement. Cranston Fine Arts are very happy with the art work Brian has produced for them and have commissioned many new items to be shown over the coming years.

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This Week's Half Price Art

Themistocles had chosen the narrow waters at the entrance to the bay well. The Persians could not bring their larger fleet to bear on the smaller Greek fleet and due to the design and manoeuverability of the Greek Triremes, the Greek fleet sailed down the right channel next to Salamis and turned to ram the Persian fleet as it entered the bay. The Persian captains tried frantically to turn their ships but their oars became entangled and the turning manoeuvre caused the ships to run into each other. The Greek Triremes were able to ram the leading Persian ships, disengage and ram again. This was a great victory for Themistocles who lost only 70 ships from his fleet of 380 Triremes, compared to the loss of over 600 ships from the Persian fleet of over 1,000.

Battle of Salamis, 23rd September 480BC by Wilhelm von Kaulbach (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
In 1485, the Lancastrian contender for the throne of England, Henry Tudor, sailed from France with a small force of mainly continental mercenaries determined to wrestle the crown from Richard III.  Gathering many supporters along the way he eventually arrived at Bosworth with an army numbering 5000 against Richards 8000.  Things began well enough for Richard but it became apparent during the battle that the neutral Stanley Brothers, Sir William Stanley and Lord Thomas Stanley and their men who had remained on the sidelines, had elected to fight for Henry.  Richard charged for Henry in person but was overwhelmed and killed.  He was the last English King to die in battle.  Although not the final battle of the War of the Roses, the victory for Henry at Bosworth secured the crown and began the Tudor dynasty.

Battle of Bosworth by Brian Palmer (P)
Half Price! - £1700.00
Lassalle, shown here on Campaign in Prussia 1806. He was killed in the charge at the Battle of Wagram (1809) at the age of 34.
Le General Lassalle, Commandant La Brigade Infernal by Benigni.
Half Price! - £30.00
 Commissioned for the 25th Anniversary, Army Dog Unit, RAVC Northern Ireland, 1973-1998.

Search and Secure, Army Dog Unit by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

 Mistaking the withdrawal of wounded troops from the plateau of Mount St John for a general retreat , Marshal Ney ordered 5000 heavy and light cavalry to charge the allied position.  Far from retreating, Wellington was in fact reinforcing his beleaguered front line.  Wave after wave of French cavalry repeatedly threw themselves at the allied squares for over an hour but failed to make an impact.  Here we see the 30th Regt - now the Queens Lancashire Regt - formed in square repelling The Dutch (Red) Lancers of the Imperial Guard.

Charge of the Dutch Lancers against the British Squares at Waterloo by Brian Palmer. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
Battle fought in Algeria on 24th November 1836 depicting Marshall Clauzel Gegen Constantine leading the French troops.
Battle of Somah by Horace Vernet (GL)
Half Price! - £250.00
Captain Fields 2 Scimitar and 2 Scorpion light tanks of 3 Troop The Blues and Royals along with the Milan platoon, provide vital covering fire for 2 Paras assault on the North Spur Wireless Ridge (Apple Pie)  Following lessons learned at Goose Green additional support was available from artillery, mortars, machine guns and even HMS Ambuscade.  Despite the attack being conducted at night, with frequent snow flurries, and minefields, all the objectives were taken, and at first light the road to Port Stanley lay open and unopposed.

Battle for Wireless Ridge, Falklands, 13th June 1982 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1900.00
By about 6pm the Zulu attacks had extended all around the front of the post, and fighting raged at hand-to-hand along the mealie-bag wall.  Lieutenant Chard himself took up a position on the barricade, firing over the mealie-bags with a Martini-Henry, whilst Lieutenant Bromhead directed any spare men to plug the gaps in the line.  The men in the yard and on the front wall were dangerously exposed to the fire of Zulu marksmen posted in the rocky terraces on Shiyane (Oskarsberg) hill behind the post. Several men were hit, including Acting Assistant Commissary Dalton, and Corporal Allen of the 14th.  Surgeon Reynolds treated the wounded as best he could despite the fire.  Once the veranda at the front of the hospital had been abandoned, the Zulus had mounted a determined attack on the building itself, setting fire to the thatched roof with spears tied with burning grass. The defenders were forced to evacuate the patients room by room, eventually passing them out through a small window into the open yard. Shortly after 6pm Chard decided that the Zulu pressure was too great, and ordered a withdrawal to a barricade of biscuit boxes which had been hastily erected across the yard, from the corner of the store-house to the front mealie-bag wall. In this small compound the garrison would fight for their lives throughout most of the coming night.
Rorkes Drift 22nd January 1879 - Defending the Store House by Jason Askew. (B)
Half Price! - £33.00
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