Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

Product Search        

The Iron Brigade During the Battle of Gettysburg, 1863 by Brian Palmer (GS)


The Iron Brigade During the Battle of Gettysburg, 1863 by Brian Palmer (GS)

The crack Iron Brigade of Brigadier General Wadsworths 1st Division of the army of the Potomac were the first Infantry unit to arrive on the field of Gettysburg in support of Brigadier General Bufords cavalry division who had stumbled upon General Lees advancing Army of North Virginia. The Brigade suffered 1,200 casualties out of 1800 engaged in the battle.
Item Code : DHM1037GSThe Iron Brigade During the Battle of Gettysburg, 1863 by Brian Palmer (GS) - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints.

Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Brian Palmer
on separate certificate
£460.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : The Iron Brigade During the Battle of Gettysburg, 1863 by Brian Palmer.DHM1037
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : Brian PalmerHalf Price!Now : £50.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : Brian Palmer£15 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £125.00VIEW EDITION...
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting by Brian Palmer.

SOLD.
Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Brian PalmerSOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :




Artist Details : Brian Palmer
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Brian Palmer


Brian Palmer

Ever since Brian Palmer was a young boy his two main passions have been art and history, in particular military history. Between 1965 and 1969 Brian studied graphic design and illustration at Hornsey College of Art in London and for many years worked as a Designer / Illustrator, primarily in the music and publishing industries. Some years ago he began to work solely as a freelance illustrator, eventually concentrating exclusively on military paintings as a means of combining his two great loves. The substantial majority of Brian's paintings of the past 12 or so years have been commisisoned by Cranston Fine Arts, and signed limited edition art prints have been produced, covering many famous and not so famous periods of warfare. For Brian, one of the most important elements of a painting is research. Costume or uniform details, arms, geography and even weather conditions if known, can all combine to bring a realistic and accurate look to a piece of work. Brian has been influenced by many artists and illustrators over the years but his personal favourites within the military genre are Messionier, J.P. Beadle and Caton Woodville, and he has long been a great admirer of Vermeer, Carravagio and the Pre-Raphaelite movement. Cranston Fine Arts are very happy with the art work Brian has produced for them and have commissioned many new items to be shown over the coming years.

More about Brian Palmer

This Week's Half Price Art

At 0620 hours covered by a brief barrage from 1000 guns, the tanks of C and F Battalions in MkIV tanks advanced alongside the men of the British 12th Division against the impregnable German Hindenburg line at Cambrai.  Supported in the air by 4 RFC squadron flying ground attack missions, the general offensive had broken through 3 trench lines and penetrated 5 miles on a 6 mile front by lunchtime.  Although these gains were not exploited and later retaken by a German counter offensive, Cambrai showed the full potential of the tank on the battlefield.

Battle of Cambrai, France, 20th November 1917 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Acting Assistant Commissary J.L. Dalton commissariat and transport department and colour sergeant F. Bourne, during the battle at the front wall about 6pm at Rorkes Drift. Frank Bourne was born  on the 27th April 1854  in Balcombe Sussex, when Bourne was 18 he joined the 24th Regiment in 1872, being promoted to Corporal in 1875 and Sergeant in 1878.  Sergeant Bourne was promoted to Colour Sergeant soon after the rgeiment arrived in Natal.  Colour Sgt bourne was part of B company whose job was to guard the hospital at Rorkes Drift.  Colour Sgt Bourne played a major role in keeping the defending troops effective.  Colour Sgt Bourne was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his role in the defence, and it is surprising that he was not awarded a Victoria Cross as 11 were awarded for the defence. Col Sgt Bourne retired form the army in 1907, but  joined again for WW1, serving in Dublin.  He was the last survivor of Rorkes Drift, passing away at the age of 91 on the 8th May 1945 by coincidence being VE day.

Pot That Fellow by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £3900.00
 The colour and pageantry of the Raj is exemplified by a full-dress review in honour of the Viceroys visit to Luknow in 1899. The famous regiment of Bengal Lancers known as Skinners Horse, or Sikander Sahibs Yellow Boys receive the salutes from British Army staff officers. Also present are the 3rd Hussars.

Sikander Sahibs Yellow Boys by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - £55.00
 The year is 1807, the French Empire is at the pinnacle of its power. Although not yet 38 years of age the Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte is marching towards the heights of his military career. It is the anniversary of his great victory against the Austrians at Marengo seven years before. Since then the soldiers of The Grand Armee have faithfully followed The Little Corporal from victory to victory across Europe.  Now, in eastern Prussia, the Russians alone are holding out against the might of France. Bennigsens army is strung out on a four mile front along the banks of the river Alle, near the town of Friedland. With their backs to the unfordable river the brave Russian soldiers are drawn up in a poor position to give battle.  It is already midday when Napoleon arrives on the field. Much of the French force is still some miles away but the commanders keen eye immediately perceives an opportunity for victory. He decides to attack. The vigourous assault on the Russian lines commences at about 5.30 pm. Bennigsen, anticipating an engagement on the following day, is completely surprised by this ferocious attack so late in the afternoon. The fighting begins as his divisions are preparing to withdraw across the river Alle, to a stronger position. Napoleons master stroke throws the enemy into confusion. By 8.30 pm the French are masters of the field, the Russians have lost nearly a third of their army and 80 cannons. The town of Friedland is ablaze and the Tsars army in full retreat.  In simple attire and characteristically astride a nimble arab grey, Napoleon Bonaparte rides forward with his reserves of the Guard to survey the final victory.  Within a few days the defeated Tsar Alexander will embrace the French Emperor on a raft anchored in the middle of the Niemen at Tilsit. At their monumental meeting they will talk of peace, co-operation against the British, the division of Prussian Territories and France with Russia will form their uneasy alliance that will quickly collapse into open hostility and present Napoleon with his greatest challenge: The invasion of Russia itself.

Napoleon at Friedland by Mark Churms. (AP)
Half Price! - £95.00

 A Voltigeur corporal, 2nd battalion, 4th regiment etranger, Holland 1813.

Tireur D Elite by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 1st Battalion in action at Escaut Canal, Belgium, May 1940. The last Highland Regiment to wear a kilt in battle, attacking the Germans at the River Escaut.  From the Diary of Captain R. Leah, 1st Battalion, Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders : Tuesday 21st May : Bn left Ere about 2 a.m. to march back. Fortunately Coy Cmdr. were required for some sort of recce and we went in C.O.s car.  Arrived Taintignies 3 a.m. and self went out again with Wilkie in C.O.s car to look for for C Coy which had gone astray, and to see Q.M. about Bn rations in Wez-Velvain.  Could not find either.  Met the Battalion arriving from Ere when I left the village at 3 a.m.  Got back myself at 4 a.m. found empty house which I entered by window and slept well for 5 hours. Officers mess going in house beside M.T. park, and had good breakfast.  Fairly quiet morning and orders to move this afternoon to Bn assembly position S of Wez-Velvain.  Thence we were directed to Merlin and prepared for counter-attack to drive enemy off Western side of Escaut.

The Charge of the 1st Battalion Queens Own Cameron Highlanders by David Rowlands (AP)
Half Price! - £50.00
 In his 50s with 30 years experience, who has now attained High Centurian rank and commands the entire 1st Cohort.

Primus Pilus by Chris Collingwood. (GS)
Half Price! - £280.00
 Renault FT 17 baby tanks of the recently formed US 304th tank brigade commanded by the young Lt. Col George S. Patton Jnr. are employed for the first time during the allied assault on the St Mihiel Salient. Leading the 344th battalion in person Patton and his tanks help the infantry divisions push the enemy back to the Hindenberg line in only 4 days.

Baptism of Fire - St Mihiel Salient, 12th – 15th September 1918 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1700.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket