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Balaclava by Lady Elizabeth Butler.


Balaclava by Lady Elizabeth Butler.

The remnants of the Light Brigade (Hussars, Lancers, and Light Dragoons) returning from the disastrous charge during the Battle of Balaclava, 25th October 1854.
Item Code : DHM0068Balaclava by Lady Elizabeth Butler. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print.

This lithographic print has been reproduced from an original hand coloured lithograph from 1902. Under the image is printed the poem by Alfred Lord Tennyson, The Charge of The Light Brigade.
Image size 32 inches x 15 inches (81cm x 38cm)none30 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : 45.00

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EXCLUSIVE website offer from Cranston Fine Arts - FREE art print(s) supplied with the above item!


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FREE PRINT : Surgeon General Sir James Mouat VC by Hussaly.

This complimentary art print worth 14
(Size : 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm))
has been specially chosen by Cranston Fine Arts to complement the above edition, and will be sent FREE with your order.

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Buy With :
Relief of the Light Brigade by Richard Caton Woodville.
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Return from Inkerman by Lady Elizabeth Butler.
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Other editions of this item : Balaclava by Lady Elizabeth Butler. DHM0068
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print.

This lithographic print has been reproduced from an original hand coloured lithograph from 1902.
Image size 12 inches x 6 inches (31cm x 15cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!14.00VIEW EDITION...
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Black and white photogravure, published 1911. One available. Image size 14 inches x 25 inches (36cm x 64cm)none900.00VIEW EDITION...
POSTCARD

SOLD OUT
Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)noneSOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :



Artist Details : Lady Elizabeth Butler
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Lady Elizabeth Butler


Lady Elizabeth Butler

Elizabeth Thompson, later Lady Butler, was perhaps the leading painter of this genre of the late nineteenth century. Her famous quartet of paintings exhibited between 1874 and 1877 (Calling the Roll after and Engagement in the Crimea - Her Majesty the Queen; Quatre Bras - National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; Balaclava - City of Manchester Art Gallery; and The Return from Inkerman - Ferens Art Gallery, Kingston upon Hull) established her reputation but her subsequent works never quite achieved the fame of these earlier pictures, in spite of such dramatic scenes as Scotland for Ever! (Leeds City Art Gallery) and The Defence of Rorkes Drift (Her Majesty the Queen) She continued to exhibit at the Royal Academy until 1920 but with few exceptions, all her pictures had military themes particularly soldiers in battle. While she never witnessed actual warfare, although she was in Egypt for some years in the 1880s with her husband, Lieut. Gen. Sir William Butler, many of her pictures were drawn accurately using models in some cases, or observing soldiers on maneuvers or practicing charges at Aldershot. For instance, when Queen Victoria commissioned the artist to depict the defense of Rorkes Drift, Elizabeth Butler went down to Gosport where the 24th Regiment was billeted upon its return from Natal, and made sketches from life. The soldiers even re-enacted the battle in their original uniforms worn throughout the campaign.

More about Lady Elizabeth Butler

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