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Return from Inkerman by Lady Elizabeth Butler (B)


Return from Inkerman by Lady Elizabeth Butler (B)

A column of exhausted and wounded men of the Coldstream Guards and the 20th East Devonshire regiment returning from the heights of Inkerman, 5th November 1854, during the Crimean War.
Item Code : DHM0002BReturn from Inkerman by Lady Elizabeth Butler (B) - This Edition
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Battle of Inkerman Military Prints Trade Value Pack.

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Titles in this pack :
The Barrier by Marjorie Weatherstone.  (View This Item)
The 55th Regiment at the Battle of Inkerman by Orlando Norie.  (View This Item)
The 20th Foot at the Battle of Inkerman 5th November 1854 by David Rowlands.  (View This Item)
Return from Inkerman by Lady Elizabeth Butler (B)  (View This Item)

Lady Elizabeth Butler Military Print Pack.

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Titles in this pack :
The Dawn of Waterloo by Lady Elizabeth Butler.  (View This Item)
Scotland Forever by Lady Elizabeth Butler.  (View This Item)
Steady the Drums and Fifes by Lady Elizabeth Butler.  (View This Item)
Quatre Bras by Lady Elizabeth Butler.  (View This Item)
Scots Guards Saving the Colours at Alma by Lady Elizabeth Butler.  (View This Item)
The Roll Call by Lady Elizabeth Butler.  (View This Item)
Balaclava by Lady Elizabeth Butler.  (View This Item)
Return from Inkerman by Lady Elizabeth Butler (B)  (View This Item)

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Other editions of this item : Return from Inkerman by Lady Elizabeth Butler.DHM0002
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PRINT Open edition print. Image size 30 inches x 15 inches (76cm x 38cm)noneHalf Price!
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Small number of giclee canvas prints available. Size 40 inches x 26 inches (102cm x 66cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£600.00VIEW EDITION...
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Artist Details : Lady Elizabeth Butler
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Lady Elizabeth Butler


Lady Elizabeth Butler

Elizabeth Thompson, later Lady Butler, was perhaps the leading painter of this genre of the late nineteenth century. Her famous quartet of paintings exhibited between 1874 and 1877 (Calling the Roll after and Engagement in the Crimea - Her Majesty the Queen; Quatre Bras - National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; Balaclava - City of Manchester Art Gallery; and The Return from Inkerman - Ferens Art Gallery, Kingston upon Hull) established her reputation but her subsequent works never quite achieved the fame of these earlier pictures, in spite of such dramatic scenes as Scotland for Ever! (Leeds City Art Gallery) and The Defence of Rorkes Drift (Her Majesty the Queen) She continued to exhibit at the Royal Academy until 1920 but with few exceptions, all her pictures had military themes particularly soldiers in battle. While she never witnessed actual warfare, although she was in Egypt for some years in the 1880s with her husband, Lieut. Gen. Sir William Butler, many of her pictures were drawn accurately using models in some cases, or observing soldiers on maneuvers or practicing charges at Aldershot. For instance, when Queen Victoria commissioned the artist to depict the defense of Rorkes Drift, Elizabeth Butler went down to Gosport where the 24th Regiment was billeted upon its return from Natal, and made sketches from life. The soldiers even re-enacted the battle in their original uniforms worn throughout the campaign.

More about Lady Elizabeth Butler

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Half Price! - £750.00
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Half Price! - £250.00
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Prince Rupert beginning his career as a leader of the Royalist Cavalry drove the Parliamentarian Cavalry off the field. Prince Rupert was a nephew of King Charles I and commanded the Royalist cavalry during the English Civil War.  Prince Rupert was born on 17th December1619 in Prague.   His mother was Elizabeth, the sister of Charles I.  Rupert became a soldier and fought in the Thirty Years War (1618 - 1648) and in 1642, he joined the army of Charles I in the English Civil War. He was soon appointed to lead the royalist cavalry and fought in the first major battle of the war at Edgehill in October 1642. His cavalry charge completely routed the parliamentarians but he got carried away and pursued them too far from the battlefield, losing the chance to inflict a decisive defeat. His reputation grew after a number of military.  In 1644  Prince Rupert led the spectacular relief of the siege of York  but  his army was defeated by a parliamentary army at Battle of Marston Moor, losing York and the north to Cromwell    In June 1645 he took part in the Battle of Naseby at which the royalists were defeated.  In September Rupert surrendered Bristol to parliament and in response the king abruptly withdrew his commission. Rupert left for exile in Holland.  After the restoration of the monarchy in 1660, Rupert held a series of British naval commands, fighting in the Second and Third Anglo-Dutch Wars.  On 19th November 1682 Prince Rupert died.
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Royal Engineers Clearing one of the Convoy Routes (Route TRIANGLE) in the mountains of Central Bosnia, for a convoy of Royal Logistics Corps (RLC) vehicles.  David Rowlands travelled this muddy route in early 1993, bouncing and rocking in a Land Rover on my way to Gornji Vakuf with members of 8 Squadron RLC.  I made sketches at various points, including Camp Redoubt and the lake near Prozor.  Two days earlier on 5th April 1993, at Omis Camp, he watched a small ceremonial parade when members of the Royal Corps of Transport re-badged as part of the newly-formed Royal Logistic Corps.

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Half Price! - £200.00
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Half Price! - £40.00
<b>One ex-display print with slights damage to the border, and light dents and scratches which would be unnoticeable once framed.</b>
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Half Price! - £25.00
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