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Great Catalina Take-Off by Roy Cross.

Great Catalina Take-Off by Roy Cross.

Item Code : SPQ5253Great Catalina Take-Off by Roy Cross. - This Edition
PRINTSigned edition. Image size 15 inches x 24 inches (38cm x 61cm)none£20 Off!Now : £50.00


Buy With :
Flight Out of Hell by Nicolas Trudgian.
for £180 -
Save £110

Buy With :
Black Cat, Indian Ocean, 1944 by David Pentland.
for £145 -
Save £50
US Navy PBY Catalina Aviation Print Pack.

Pack price : £230 - Save £188

Buy With :
3 other prints in this pack :

Pack price : £230 - Save £188

Titles in this pack :
Flight Out of Hell by Nicolas Trudgian.  (View This Item)
Great Catalina Take-Off by Roy Cross.  (View This Item)
Main Body by Stan Stokes.  (View This Item)
Black Cat Rescue by Nicolas Trudgian.  (View This Item)

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The Aircraft :
CatalinaBuilt by the Consolidated Aircraft Company and designed by Isaax M Ladden. the Catalina first flew on the 28th march 1935. and first flew with the US Navy in October 1936. In 1935 the cost of each Catalina was $90,000 and just over 4,000 were built. The Catalina was used in various maritime roles. but it was designed initially as a maritime patrol bomber. Its long range was intended to seek out enemy transport and supply ships. but was eventually used in many roles including Convoy escort,, anti submarine warfare and search and rescue. In its role as a search and rescue aircraft it probably is best remembered for many thousands of aircrews shot down in the Pacific and less extend in the Atlantic and Mediterranean. The Catalina was the most successful flying boat of the war and even served in a military role until the early 1980's some are still used today in aerial firefighting.
Artist Details : Roy Cross
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Roy Cross

Roy Cross

Aviaiton and marine artist Roy Cross, probabaly best known for his superb series of illustrations for the Airfix model kit boxes. Roy Cross was born in 1924 in Southwark, London. Primarily self-taught, Cross studied briefly at the Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts and at St. Martin's School of Fine Arts in London. During World War Two Roy Cross worked as a technical illustrator for training manuals in an aircraft factory. After the war Roy Cross worked as a commercial artist and in the 1960's started illustrating for Airfix his first picture being the Dornier DO-217 aircraft kit. He worked for 10 years with the company until 1974 when he produced his last illustration for the Prinz Eugen kit box. He subsequently lived in the United States.

More about Roy Cross

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