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On the Prowl by Timothy OBrien.


On the Prowl by Timothy OBrien.

Royal Air Force catalina over flys a Royal Navy Cruiser of Gibraltar while on patrol.
Item Code : TO0002On the Prowl by Timothy OBrien. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print.

Image size 14.5 inches x 9.5 inches (37cm x 23cm)Artist : Timothy OBrien18.00

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The Aircraft :
NameInfo
CatalinaBuilt by the Consolidated Aircraft Company and designed by Isaax M Ladden. the Catalina first flew on the 28th march 1935. and first flew with the US Navy in October 1936. In 1935 the cost of each Catalina was $90,000 and just over 4,000 were built. The Catalina was used in various maritime roles. but it was designed initially as a maritime patrol bomber. Its long range was intended to seek out enemy transport and supply ships. but was eventually used in many roles including Convoy escort,, anti submarine warfare and search and rescue. In its role as a search and rescue aircraft it probably is best remembered for many thousands of aircrews shot down in the Pacific and less extend in the Atlantic and Mediterranean. The Catalina was the most successful flying boat of the war and even served in a military role until the early 1980's some are still used today in aerial firefighting.
Artist Details : Timothy OBrien
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Timothy OBrien


Timothy OBrien

Tim O'Brien was born in nottingham in 1970 and since childhood has pursued a passion for art. After working in several commercial art studios, he became a full time freelance artist and illustrator at the age of 22. A former ATC cadet with 1936 (Newton) Squadron, Tim has flown as a passenger in a range of aircraft including the Tiger Moth, Chipmunk, Ju52, Hercules, HS 125 and the Lancaster and Dakota of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight, gathering first hand knowledge for his detailed paintings, and is now accepted as one of the youngest full members of the Guild of Aviation Artists.

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