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Vulcan  XH558, The Loved One by Michael Rondot.


Vulcan XH558, The Loved One by Michael Rondot.

Few aircraft have evoked such strong emotions with the airshow-going public as Vulcan XH558. Climbing almost vertically, with black smoke pouring from its thundering Olympus engines at full power, the Vulcan could bring any airshow to a complete standstill. Crowds watched in awe as the majestic delta winged bomber created a deafening roar of smoke and noise, the sight and sound of its display an emotional and unforgettable experience for those who witnessed it.
Item Code : MR0053Vulcan XH558, The Loved One by Michael Rondot. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 558 prints.

Paper size 27 inches x 20 inches (69cm x 51cm) Thomas, David
Radley, Lord Craig of
Withers, Martin
+ Artist : Michael Rondot
£10 Off!Now : £80.00

Quantity:
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Other editions of this item : Vulcan XH558, The Loved One by Michael Rondot MR0053
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 60 artist proofs. Paper size 27 inches x 20 inches (69cm x 51cm) Thomas, David
Radley, Lord Craig of
Withers, Martin
+ Artist : Michael Rondot
£130.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
The signature of Marshall of the Royal Air Force, The Lord Craig of Radley, GCB OBE

Marshall of the Royal Air Force, The Lord Craig of Radley, GCB OBE
*Signature Value : £15

Lord Craig entered the RAF in 1951and was a QFI and Hunter fighter pilot before joining No 35 Sqn in 1962 to fly the then brand new Vulcan B2. He commanded No 35 Sqn until 1965 and flew numerous other types during his distinguished career. He was Commander-in-Chief RAF Strike Command, Chief of the Air Staff, Chief of the Defence Staff and in 1991 was appointed a Life Peer. His affection for the Vulcan has remained undiminished and he has the unique distinction of having flown the Vulcan in every rank in the RAF from Squadron Leader to Marshall of the Royal Air Force.
The signature of Squadron Leader David Thomas

Squadron Leader David Thomas
*Signature Value : £15

Squadron Leader David Thomas joined the Royal Air Force in 1962. His Service career has been evenly split between being a qualified flying instructor and the Vulcan. He has completed 5 tours of duty on the Vulcan, 3 of them as an instructor, and he first displayed the aircraft in 1973. In addition to the Vulcan, he has instructed on the Jet Provost, Tucano, Jetstream, DC3 and Lancaster. Squadron Leader Thomas currently serves at Royal Air Force College Cranwelland on The Battle of Britain Memorial Flight.
The signature of Squadron Leader Martin Withers, DFC

Squadron Leader Martin Withers, DFC
*Signature Value : £35

Joined the RAF in 1968. In 1971, he was posted to 44 Sqn at RAF Waddington as a Vulcan co-pilot, remaining there on 50 Sqn as a captain until 1976. After 3 years as a Jet Provost QFI at RAF Linton-on-Ouse, he returned to RAF Scampton as a QFI on the Vulcan Operational Conversion Unit. When the OCU closed, he moved again to RAF Waddington as Pilot Leader and Squadron QFI on 101 Sqn. The following year, during the Falklands War, he and his crew were selected to fly 2 of the 5 Black Buck missions. Martin Withers was the captain on XM607, the first Vulcan to bomb in anger during the Falklands War. On 1 May 1982, just one month after the Argentine invasion, Withers and his crew completed Black Buck One, the longest distance bombing mission in history until that time, and one of the most significant, attacking Port Stanley airfield during an 8,000 mile, 16 hour flight from their base at Ascension Island. for which he was awarded the DFC, with the other crewmembers being Mentioned in Dispatches. With the final demise of the Vulcan squadrons, he returned to No1 FTS at RAF Linton-on-Ouse, where he served as squadron commander and Deputy Chief Instructor, until leaving the RAF in 1991, having flown over 5500 hours (2000 on Vulcans). Since then he has accumulated a further 9500 hours on a variety of airliners, and is now flying the Boeing 767.
The Aircraft :
NameInfo
VulcanThe Avro Vulcan was the worlds first delta winged heavy bomber. the first prototype flew on the 30th August 1952 and the first production Vulcan flew in February 1955. The first Avro Vulcan's arrived for service with the Royal Air Force with 230 operational Conversion Unit (OCU) at RAF Finningley in May 1956. with the first squadron to receive the Vulcan in July 1957 was 83 squadron. In April 1968 Bomber Command merged into the Newly created Strike Command with eight Squadrons being equipped with Vulcan's. A terrain Hugging variant was introduced (the Vulcan SR2) in 1973, to all squadrons except no. 27 squadron (Flying Elephants) which was a Maritime reconnaissance Sqd. The Last Major role for the Avro Bomber was the bombing of Argentinean Airfields in the Falkland Islands During The Falklands Conflict The Avro Vulcan high Altitude Bomber with a crew of five. Top Speed 650 mph with a ceiling of 60,000 feet. maximum range of 5750 miles (with in flight refuelling). with a conventional bomb load of 21 x 1000 lb bombs
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

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