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Victor Farewell by Michael Rondot.


Victor Farewell by Michael Rondot.

The Handley Page Victor played a significant role in the Falklands conflict of 1982 and in the Gulf War of 1991.The final flight by an RAF Victor was made in November 1993 when XH672 Maid Marian flew from its RAF Marham base destined for the RAF Museum at Cosford. After three decades of front-line Squadron service with the Royal Air Force, two wars, and over 40 years since their conception, thc last of the V-bombers has retired.
Item Code : MR0052Victor Farewell by Michael Rondot. - This Edition
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PRINTSigned limited edition of 500 prints.

Paper size 28 inches x 20 inches (71cm x 51cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£5 Off!Now : £70.00

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Other editions of this item : Victor Farewell by Michael Rondot MR0052
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ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Paper size 28 inches x 20 inches (71cm x 51cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£120.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


The Aircraft :
NameInfo
VictorThe Handley Page Victor was a British jet bomber aircraft produced by the Handley Page Aircraft Company. It was the third and final of the "V bombers" which provided Britain's nuclear deterrent. The other two V-bombers were the Avro Vulcan and the Vickers Valiant. The Victor was the last of the V-bombers to enter service and the last to retire, nine years after the last Vulcan (The Handley Page Victor saw service in the Falklands War and 1991 Gulf War as an in-flight refuelling tanker. The only Offensive mission that the Victors was during the Bornio Conflict in 1962 to 1966 where two B.1A Victors flew missions.
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

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