Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

Product Search        

Second to None by Michael Rondot. (AP)


Second to None by Michael Rondot. (AP)

The unofficial motto of Number 2 Squadron Royal Air Force. It features, in typical Rondot style (and typical British weather!) Two No II (AC) Sqn Tornado GR-1As landing on a rain soaked runway on a typically filthy and wet Friday afternoon just minutes before the bar opens, and their home base at RAF Marham in Norfolk, closes in cross winds and driving rain. (Just in time to get to the mess for a quick one!) The main aircraft illustrated, is ZA400 (T) which was the personal aircraft of Wg Cdr R F Garwood DFC during the Gulf War in which he flew 19 low level night reconnaissance missions over Iraq. Notice the spray shooting off the main and nose wheel undercarriage legs, the distorted reflections of red and green bouncing up from the runway from the Port and Starboard navigation lights, you can almost feel the pressure and the whole weight of the awesome Tornado bearing down on that nose wheel as the aircraft decelerates down from its initial 150kts landing speed to the subtle gentle momentum of taxi. But what makes it for me is the second ship just behind and to the left of Zulu Alpha 400 bringing up the rear, braking hard, landing lights full on in an naive attempt to try to carve out a tunnel of vision for the Pilot in an absolute impossible wall of spray behind the leader. (Try this one, Michael Schumacher?)
Item Code : MR0041APSecond to None by Michael Rondot. (AP) - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 100 artist proofs.

SOLD OUT.
Paper size 27 inches x 19 inches (69cm x 48cm)Artist : Michael RondotSOLD
OUT
NOT
AVAILABLE
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Tornado
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

This Week's Half Price Art

 Lieutenant Robert C Wattenburger shows off the unique lines of the Vought F.4U Corsair 124723 (NP-8) of VC-3 during a low-level fly-by of USS Valley Forge in May, 1952.

Valley Forge Fly-By by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £600.00
 Nine O Nine awaits her next mission over occupied Europe. Part of the 91st Bomb Group, 323rd Squadron, this B-17 went on to complete a record mission tally of 140 without an abort or loss of a single crew member. She started operations in February 1944. By April 1945 Nine O Nine had flown an extraordinary 1,129 hours. This aircraft and crew represented just one of many who fought in war-torn skies for the freedom we now enjoy.

Nine O Nine by Philip West. (Y)
Half Price! - £67.50
 Watched by keen eyes, an Upkeep bomb arrives on the threshold to be loaded onto the special cradle beneath a Lancaster of 617 Dambusters Squadron on the eve of their perilous journey to the Ruhr Valley on the night of 16th May 1943 when the Möhne and Eder dams were breached under the codename Operation Chastise.

Bombing Up by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £850.00
 When the American Army reached the Rhine at Remagen on March 7, 1945, such was the speed of their advance, they arrived before the retreating Germans had time to blow the vital bridge. The Americans seized the bridge intact. Realising the threat to the German defences, the Luftwaffe were ordered into destroy the bridge at all costs. Desperate efforts were made to attack the bridge, and over the course of the following days the fighting became one of the legendary battles of the war. Two RAF Tempests have flown right through the Luftwaffe formation of Me262 and Arado 234 jets bombers, the high speed aircraft missing each other by feet. The concentration of the desperate attackers is broken momentarily, sufficiently so that their bombs miss the target - but more Luftwaffe aircraft can be seen streaming into attack

Clash Over Remagen by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Half Price! - £120.00

 Soldiers aboard a Merlin helicopter over Helmand Province, Afghanistan, 2010.

Soldiers Over Helmand by Graeme Lothian. (P)
Half Price! - £1000.00
 A pair of P51D Mustangs of the 361st Fighter Group, 8th Air Force, escort a damaged B17G Flying Fortress of the 381st Bomb Group back to its home base of Ridgewell, England, during the Autumn of 1944.

Last One Home by Ivan Berryman. (F)
Half Price! - £100.00
In this lovely picture from Graham Bosworth, the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight (BBMF) is seen flying past the very famous Boston Stump in Lincolnshire (properly known as St Botolph*#39;s Church).  Called the Boston 'Stump' because the tower was completed over a period of 100 years, appearing as a stump on the horizon (alternative theory is that the tower should have had a spire on top of it and the 'stump' is therefore the base.  St Botolph's is one of the largest parish churches in England.  Founded in 1390, St Botolph's is aiming to raise £3,000,000 by 2009 in time for its 700th birthday and for much-needed restoration.  The BBMF is much beloved by many people of all ages and the sounds of the engines from these World War II aircraft still draws the crowds.  Based at Conningsby in Lincolnshire the formation displays throughout Europe.

Salute to the Stump by Graham Bosworth. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
 Wing Commander Ken Wallis flies his WA-115 autogyro over the Shinmoi Crater in the Krishima area of the southern Japanese island of Kyushu in preparation for filming the action sequences for the James Bond film <i>You Only Live Twice</i>.  Those of us who enjoy a certain series of spy films will be much aware of Little Nellie, designed by Wing Commander Ken Wallis MBE She is pictured flying above the tops of extinct volcanoes.  Little Nellie was one of 3 military Type WA-116 built during 1962 and one of these remains today taking part in military exercises and with camouflage bodywork.  These operate in remote military and civilian roles and a specially-silenced WA-117 was used during the Loch Ness investigation and for special photography in Saudi Arabia.  These effective and nimble autogyros have been flown from Naval patrol craft which are too small for helicopters.  The Wallis autogyros have held all 20 of the UK official world records for autogyro speed, time to climb, altitude, range and duration and even now, further world record-breaking flights are being planned.

Little Nellie by Robert Tomlin. (Y)
Half Price! - £60.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket