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Paveway Tornados by Michael Rondot.


Paveway Tornados by Michael Rondot.

In this remarkably accurate portrayal of low level action at sunset he features a pair of FLIR-equipped Tornado GR4s carrying a TIALD laser designator pod and GBU-24 Paveway III laser guided bombs. These weapons, used to such devastating effect during the Gulf War by USAF F-lllF and F-117A Black Jet aircraft, now give the RAF the same capability to attack targets with pinpoint accuracy, both day and night, in adverse weather and from all altitudes.
Item Code : MR0038Paveway Tornados by Michael Rondot. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 500 prints.

Paper size 28 inches x 20 inches (71cm x 51cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£75.00

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Other editions of this item : Paveway Tornados by Michael Rondot. MR0038
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Paper size 28 inches x 20 inches (71cm x 51cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£120.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Tornado
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

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