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Tornado F3 by Michael Rondot. (AP)


Tornado F3 by Michael Rondot. (AP)

Tornado F3 taking off on a dark and wet afternoon with the characteristic pink and blue afterburner plume blazing from its RB 199 engines. The controversial Tornado F3 replaced both the Lightning and F-4 Phantom in the RAF, and flew operational combat air patrols throughout the Gulf War.
Item Code : MR0049APTornado F3 by Michael Rondot. (AP) - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 20 artist proofs.

We have two prints of this fantastic sold out edition available.
Paper size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm) Sold Out Edition. Four secondary market prints available. Curtiss, John
+ Artist : Michael Rondot
160.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo


The signature of Air Marshal Sir John Curtiss KCB KBE

Air Marshal Sir John Curtiss KCB KBE
*Signature Value : 30

John Curtiss trained as a navigator in RAF Bomber Command. He joined his first operational squadron - 578 Squadron, in 1944, flying Halifax IIIs. He later flew as a Halifax navigator with 158 Squadron at RAF Lissett. After the war Sir John held many high ranking posts in the RAF, and was Air Commander Falklands Operations in 1982.
The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Tornado
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

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