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Panavia Tornado GR1 by Michael Rondot.


Panavia Tornado GR1 by Michael Rondot.

A 14 Squadron Tornado GR1 based at RAF Bruggen Germany carrying a full JP233 war fit roars into the sky as a Jaguar overshoots to the right of the runway to go around to land. Of all the television and press images of the Gulf War, few were as dramatic as the pictures of the first waves of aircraft taking off to attack Iraqi airfields under cover of darkness. Yet when this print of a Tornado taking off carrying a full warload of JP 233 airfield denial weapons was published, such a scenario was unthinkable. The events of 1991 are foretold in this powerful portrayal of a Tornado taking off in a blast of steam from a rain drenched runway, with a Jaguar strike/attack aircraft breaking into the circuit in the background.
Item Code : MR0050Panavia Tornado GR1 by Michael Rondot. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 450 prints.

We have the last 6 copies if this sold out edition.
Paper size 36 inches x 22 inches (91cm x 56cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£120.00

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Destination: Libya. Tornado GR.4s of 9 Squadron by Ivan Berryman.
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On Track by Ronald Wong.
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Other editions of this item : Panavia Tornado GR1 by Michael Rondot MR0050
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ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs.

SOLD OUT.
Paper size 36 inches x 22 inches (91cm x 56cm)Artist : Michael RondotSOLD
OUT
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General descriptions of types of editions :


The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Tornado
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

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