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Jaguars Over Bosnia by Michael Rondot


Jaguars Over Bosnia by Michael Rondot

Royal Air Force Jaguar strike aircraft in action over Bosnia on close air support and reconnaissance operations. Each print bears the colour Royal Crests of Royal Air Force Coltishall and No. 6, 41 and 54 Jaguar Squadrons.
Item Code : MR0028Jaguars Over Bosnia by Michael Rondot - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 500 prints.

Paper size 27 inches x 20 inches (69cm x 51cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£75.00

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Other editions of this item : Jaguars Over Bosnia by Michael Rondot.MR0028
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Limited edition of remarques. Paper size 27 inches x 20 inches (69cm x 51cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£120.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :

The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Jaguar
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

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