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Jaguars Over Bosnia by Michael Rondot


Jaguars Over Bosnia by Michael Rondot

Royal Air Force Jaguar strike aircraft in action over Bosnia on close air support and reconnaissance operations. Each print bears the colour Royal Crests of Royal Air Force Coltishall and No. 6, 41 and 54 Jaguar Squadrons.
Item Code : MR0028Jaguars Over Bosnia by Michael Rondot - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 500 prints.

Paper size 27 inches x 20 inches (69cm x 51cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£75.00

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Other editions of this item : Jaguars Over Bosnia by Michael Rondot.MR0028
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Limited edition of remarques. Paper size 27 inches x 20 inches (69cm x 51cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£120.00VIEW EDITION...
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Extra Details : Jaguars Over Bosnia by Michael Rondot
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The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Jaguar
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

This Week's Half Price Art

Lancasters of 61 Squadron  head out for the enemy coast during the night of 3rd November 1943.  Seen in the lead Lancaster is Flt Lt Bill Reid flying QR-O.  After sustaining two heavy attacks by enemy night fighters, killing two crew members and injuring Reid in the head, shoulders and hands.  He carried on to the target, dropping accurately his bomb load.  Navigating back by Pole Star and Moon, he lost consciousness on occasions due to blood loss.  He managed to find his way Shipdharn.  Upon landing the undercarriage collapsed but luckily did not catch fire.  For his exploits that night he was awarded the Victoria Cross.

Lancaster VC by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
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The Fledgling by Ivan Berryman. (I)
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 From 1915 to 1917, there existed a very real threat of a bombing campaign on mainland Britain as the giant German airships drifted silently and menacingly across the English Channel and the North Sea to deliver their deadly cargo on the towns and cities of the east coast. Countermeasures were soon put into action as powerful searchlights picked out the Zeppelins for the anti-aircraft batteries and RFC pilots to pour their unrelenting fire into the raiders, sometimes with little effect, sometimes with catastrophic results. Here, 2nd Lieutenant Brandons BE.2 climbs for position, its exhaust pipes aglow in the dark, whilst flak bursts all around the massive bulk of the L.33 as she passes over the east end of London on the night of 23 / 24th September 1916.

A Zeppelin over London by Ivan Berryman.
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 Joint exercise between a RNLI Lifeboat and a Royal Air Force Westland Wessex from 72 Squadron off the coast of Northern Ireland.

Joint Rescue by David Pentland. (GS)
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  R5689 (VN-N) - a Lancaster B.1 of 50 Squadron based at Swinderby. This aircraft crash-landed in Lincolnshire while returning from a mission on 19th September 1942, after both port engines failed as the aircraft was preparing to land.  The aircraft never flew again.  The crew on the final mission were : <br>Sgt E J Morley RAAF,<br>P/O G W M Harrison,<br>Sgt H Male,<br>Sgt S C Garrett,<br>Sgt J W Dalby,<br>Sgt J Fraser<br>and<br>Sgt J R Gibbons RCAF, the sole member of the crew killed in the crash.

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Ace of Diamonds by Nicolas Trudgian (Y)
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