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Coup de Grace by Michael Rondot.


Coup de Grace by Michael Rondot.

30th January 1991. Day 14 of Operation Desert Storm, and ships of the Iraqi navy make a desperate dash for the northern waters of the Persian Gulf and sanctuary in Iranian waters. Only a few of them will make it through the gauntlet of Allied air-power lying in wait to attack any surface contacts.Already on fire amidships after being attacked by US Navy aircraft, this Polnocny C class landing ship has fallen prey to a pair of rocket and cannon-armed Jaguars only a few miles from the mouth of the Shatt-al-Arab waterway in southern Iraq. The Jaguars, led by Wing Commander Bill Pixton AFC, make a low pass to confirm the identity of the ship and turn away to position for their attack that will leave the Polnocny sinking, ablaze from end to end. Coup de Grace portrays the incident as it unfolds, capturing the moment when the Jaguar flight leader looks back over his shoulder at the burning ship and prepares to attack. The Jaguars will unleash four pods of CRV-7 rockets onto their target and then re-attack with 30mm cannon before returning to base at the end of a harrowing 3-hour mission. Heavily armed, and using Victor tankers to in-flight refuel, RAF Jaguars often flew combat air patrols over the northern Persian Gulf from their base at Al-Muharraq, Bahrain, during the first weeks of Operation Desert Storm. Their task was to seek and destroy Iraqi army and naval targets, or to locate and to suppress enemy AAA during rescue missions for downed Allied airmen. The results were invariably the same: the targets were hit, and the Jaguars, despite coming under fire, returned safely home.
Item Code : MR0012Coup de Grace by Michael Rondot. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 500 prints.

Paper size 25 inches x 19 inches (64cm x 48cm) Pixton, Bill
Tholen, Pete
+ Artist : Michael Rondot
£95.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Coup de Grace by Michael Rondot MR0012
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Paper size 25 inches x 19 inches (64cm x 48cm) Pixton, Bill
Tholen, Pete
+ Artist : Michael Rondot
£150.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
The signature of Flt Lt Pete Tholen

Flt Lt Pete Tholen
*Signature Value : £15

The signature of Wg Cdr Bill Pixton AFC

Wg Cdr Bill Pixton AFC
*Signature Value : £15

Commanding Officer of the RAF Gulf Jaguar Detachment.
The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Jaguar
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

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