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The Longest Minute by Michael Rondot.


The Longest Minute by Michael Rondot.

Just off target there was a lot of flak. Its the first time I have ever seen tracer coming up at me. It was the longest minute of my life. These sobering words brought home the reality of war when a Jaguar pilot described his feelings to waiting press reporters, after coming under fire front AAA during an attack on Iraqi forces in Kuwait on 20 January 1991. The remorseless precision pounding of strategic and tactical Iraqi targets in the Kuwait Theatre of Operations was barely three days old when these words were spoken, but six weeks later, as the hostilities of Operation Desert Storm reached a climax, RAF jaguar pilots still counted the seconds during the long minutes of their dive attacks onto heavily defended targets. Success was important, since many of the targets posed a serious threat to both allied ground and naval forces. Artillery and missile sites were attacked in equal measure with airfields, barracks and ammunition dumps during the Jaguars six week war. Brilliantly led by Wing Commander Bill Pixton AFC, the Jaguars, based at Al Muharraq, Bahrain, flew over 600 combat missions during Operation Desert Storm without loss, suffering only two hits from anti-aircraft fire Often flying into treacherous weather and heavy calibre AAA, the Jaguar pilots dispelled many myths about their aircraft during these tense times. We pushed the aeroplane so far outside its flight envelope that I wouldnt have believed it could do it if I hadnt seen it with my own eyes was how one pilot described taking his fully loaded Jaguar transonic at over 34,000 feet during one mission ingress. Michael Rondots painting depicts the moment when the last man to attack, the number 8 at the tail end of the formation watches and waits before tipping in to attack. For him the longest minute is about to begin. The first 4 Jaguars have already attacked and are feet wet returning to base, having dropped their load of 1000lb bombs on the target. During the next few minutes the second four-ship will press home their attack, releasing sixteen 1000lb airburst bombs totally devastating the target before escaping out to sea, away from the coastal AAA flak belt and back to their base at Bahrain.
Item Code : MR0045The Longest Minute by Michael Rondot. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 500 prints.

Paper size 29 inches x 20 inches (74cm x 51cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£95.00

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Extra Details : The Longest Minute by Michael Rondot.
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The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Jaguar
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

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