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Gauntlet by Michael Rondot.


Gauntlet by Michael Rondot.

No other jet fighter quite captures the imagination in the same way as the Harrier. To witness it in action for the first time is an experience few can easily come to terms with. A fighter flying at 500 knots and very low is fairly commonplace; but when that same aircraft suddenly decelerates to a standstill and starts flying backwards, hovering like a helicopter before landing vertically on a tiny patch of ground, it takes on a different perspective. Only the Harrier can do this, and in its updated redesigned form, it is continuing to prove its worth as the worlds finest V/STOL close air support fighter. Although capable of VTOL (Vertical Take Off and Landing) performance, the Harrier usually operates in the STOVL mode (Short Take Off and Vertical Landing) allowing it to haul a hefty warload from confined spaces without the need for conventional hard runways. The Harrier is a proven combat aircraft with distinguished service in the Falklands Campaign and the Gulf War. Harrier IIs from the United States Marine Corps flew hundreds of close air support and interdiction missions during Operation Desert Storm from forward airstrips close to the Saudi/Kuwait border which could not be used by other, conventional attack aircraft. Gauntlet portrays a bomb-laden Harrier from the RAF Strike Attack Operational Evaluation Unit in STO-motion, transitioning to forward flight from a short take off run at about 100 knots as the aircraft rapidly accelerates to cruising speed. It is carrying two AIM 9L Sidewinder missiles, ADEN 25mm cannon pods and seven Hunting BL755 cluster bombs - double the warload of the earlier Harrier variants.
Item Code : MR0021Gauntlet by Michael Rondot. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 500 prints.

Last 5 copies available of this sold out edition.
Paper size 29 inches x 20 inches (74cm x 51cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£25 Off!Now : £100.00

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Other editions of this item : Gauntlet by Michael Rondot MR0021
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs.

Last 2 copies available of this sold out edition.
Paper size 29 inches x 20 inches (74cm x 51cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£160.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


The Aircraft :
NameInfo
HarrierThe Hawker Siddeley Harrier, Vertical Take off Royal Air Force and Royal Navy ground attack fighter. with a maximum speed of 737mph and a ceiling of over 50,000 feet. range of 260 miles. The Harriers armament consisted of two 30mm Aden guns and up to 5000 lb of bombs, Rockets or other armaments under the wings. The Worlds First vertical take off and landing combat aircraft the Hawker Siddeley Harriers first arrived with No. 1 squadron Royal Air Force in July 1969. and with a variety of modifications and changes (Harrier GR 1, Harrier T2, Harrier GR3 and finally the British Aerospace Sea Harrier FRG1) The Sea Harrier commenced trials in 1977. The Fleet Air Arm received their first harriers just in time for the Falklands Conflict.
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

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