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Mirage III First and Last by Michael Rondot.


Mirage III First and Last by Michael Rondot.

In this classic study of 2 v 2 air combat, two Mirage II fighters of the Royal Australian Air Force turn at the merge to engage a pair of evading A4 skyhawks over the Pacific. The painting features the first and last Australian built Mirages in the colours of nos. 75 and 77 squadrons.
Item Code : MR0034APMirage III First and Last by Michael Rondot. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition of 50 artist proofs.

SOLD OUT.
Paper size 28 inches x 20 inches (71cm x 51cm)Artist : Michael RondotSOLD
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The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Mirage IIIThe Mirage III is a supersonic fighter aircraft designed by Dassault Aviation in France during the late 1950s, and manufactured in France and other countries. It was a successful fighter aircraft, being sold to many air forces around the world and remaining in production for over a decade. The Mirage saw action with the Argentinian Air Force during the falklands campaign and also the Isreali Air Forces Mirage aircraft saw combat. Some of the world's smaller air forces still fly Mirage IIIs or variants as front-line equipment today.
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

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