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Rock and Roll by Michael Rondot.


Rock and Roll by Michael Rondot.

You dont have to be an aviator to know that low flying in mountain valleys is fun. Anyone who has ever seen high-performance jets rolling and pulling through mountain passes will have correctly guessed that it is challenging, and exciting adrenaline-pumping stuff. Artist Michael Rondot served as a fast-jet pilot in the RAF for 25 years and remembers his introduction to low flying in North Wales : My first encounter with the A5 pass at Ogwen came in 1969 when I was a student pilot flying the Folland Gnat trainer from RAF Valley. My instructor, a chap called Norrie Bell, took control of the aircraft towards the end of a training sortie and said Shut up and watch, I want to show you something. We descended through a break in the cloud cover to low level, very low level, closer to the ground than I had ever been except when landing and accelerated to 420 knots. This was my first experience of low flying in the Gnat and I sat mesmerised in the front cockpit with eyes like saucers as the ground rushed past. Trees, water, stone walls and roads flashed by as we continued to accelerate to 480 knots at very low level. Suddenly we were in a deep U-shaped valley with a cloud-covered rock wall at the far end and, as far as I could see, no means of escape except by climbing, and climbing very, very soon, like NOW ! Next thing, I saw the ground rotate and we were in a hard 5G turn pulling DOWN into the valley floor with about 135 degrees of right bank and descending below the level of the road which I could see above my head. We raced out of the valley, still in the weeds until reaching Bethesda village when with a long sigh he handed over control to me and announced: That, young Michael, was the A5 pass. I never forgot that experience and during the next 23 years I took every opportunity to revisit the A5 pass in whatever aircraft I happened to be flying. In 1977 I flew it in a Canberra PR9 on a windy day in poor weather but would not care to repeat that frightening experience. I flew it many times in Hawk and Jaguar aircraft. For me it has a mystique unlike any other place in the UK low flying system. The best students at RAF Valley got the chance to fly the A5 pass in fighting wing formation just like these two in my painting, but I dare say the instructors in the back seats are doing the flying.
Item Code : MR0055Rock and Roll by Michael Rondot. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 500 prints.

Paper size 27 inches x 20 inches (69cm x 51cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£80.00

Quantity:
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Other editions of this item : Rock and Roll by Michael Rondot MR0055
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Paper size 27 inches x 20 inches (69cm x 51cm)Artist : Michael Rondot£120.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Gnat
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

This Week's Half Price Art

 The top scoring ace of JG.51, Anton Hafner is credited with 204 confirmed victories.  A prolific scorer, on 8th August 1944, he shot down no fewer than seven Russian Sturmoviks and, by October of that year, his overall tally had exceeded 200.  He died in combat with a Yak 7, his 204th victim, when his aircraft hit a tree. He is shown here in Messerschmitt Bf.109G-6 442013 <i>Black 1</i>.

Anton Hafner by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 At the outbreak of World War 1, AGO Flugzeugwerke GmbH had not endeared itself to the architects of the German war machine due to the flimsiness of some of its designs, coupled with poor workmanship. When the C.1 first appeared in 1915, it attracted little interest and yet went on to prove itself to be a robust and useful aircraft, its pusher design dispensing with the now traditional open framework to support the tail in favour of twin streamlined tailbooms. The observer / gunner in the nose enjoyed an unrivalled field of view, although the engines position immediately behind the pilot was always a concern in the event of a crash. This aircraft, LF181, transferred from the Fliegertrouppe to the navy in 1915 and was based at Nieuwmunster, shown here in an exchange with an FE.2b in the skies over Belgium.

AGO C.1 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Ju 52s deploy German Paratroopers during the assault on Crete (operation Mercure) 1942.

Falling Angels by Tim Fisher.
Half Price! - £35.00
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Dambusters - The Morning After by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
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An Me109 claims another Russian victim during the push on the eastern front in 1942.

Combat over the Russian Front by Jason Askew. (P)
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 Halifax glider tugs of 644 Squadron, Tarrant Rushton, 1944.

Halifax Tugs Towing Hamilcar Gliders by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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Coming Home by Tim Fisher.
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