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Desert Scorpions by Michael Rondot.


Desert Scorpions by Michael Rondot.

Dominating the foreground of his evocative painting of a typical resupply operation in the field are a Leyland Daf Drops vehicle from 12 Squadron, Royal Corps of Transport and a Multiple Launch Rocket System from 39 Heavy Regiment, Royal Artillery.
AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : MR0014Desert Scorpions by Michael Rondot. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 350 prints.

Last copies of this otherwise sold out edition available.

Great value : Value of signatures exceeds price of item!
Paper size 24 inches x 17 inches (61cm x 43cm) Billiere, Peter De La
Smith, Rupert
Durie, Ian
Wallace, John
+ Artist : Michael Rondot


Signature(s) value alone : £130
£55 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £95.00

Quantity:
EXCLUSIVE website offer from Cranston Fine Arts - FREE art print(s) supplied with the above item!


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(Size : 12 inches x 5.5 inches (31cm x 14cm))
has been specially chosen by Cranston Fine Arts to complement the above edition, and will be sent FREE with your order.

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Headquarters 4th Armoured Brigade on Objective Copper South, Iraq 27th February 1991 by David Rowlands. (B)
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The Winged Dagger by Simon Smith.
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Other editions of this item : Desert Scorpions by Michael Rondot MR0014
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs.

Last copies of this otherwise sold out edition available.
Paper size 24 inches x 17 inches (61cm x 43cm) Billiere, Peter De La
Smith, Rupert
Durie, Ian
Wallace, John
+ Artist : Michael Rondot


Signature(s) value alone : £130
£30 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £150.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


Extra Details : Desert Scorpions by Michael Rondot.
About this edition :



The signatures on the print.

About all editions :

A photo of the print :

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
The signature of General Sir Peter De La Billiere KCB KBE DSO MC MSC DL

General Sir Peter De La Billiere KCB KBE DSO MC MSC DL
*Signature Value : £45

General Sir Peter de la Billiere was born in 1934, educated at Harrow School and joined the KSLI in 1952. After commissioning into the Durham Light Infantry he served with 1 DLI in Japan, Korea and then for 2 years in the Suez Canal Zone and in Jordan. In 1956 he joined the Special Air Service in Malaya where he was mentioned in Despatches. In 1959 he led a troop during the assault in Jebel Akdar, where he won the Military Cross. He then served for almost 2 years with the Federal Regular Army before returning to command a Squadron of the SAS. From 1964 to 1966 General de ]a Billiere commanded A Squadron on operations in Radfan and Bomeo, gaining a bar to the MC. After completing the Staff Course at Cambericy and a Staff Appointment at United Kingdom Land Forces, he returned to 22 SAS as Second-inCommand and subsequently Commanding Officer. During the period 196o-74 he commanded operations in Musandam and Dhofar and established the Counter Terrorist Force immediately following the Munich Games incident. He was appointed a Member Of the Distinguished Service Order. After spending 2 years on the Directing Staff at the Army Staff College, Camberley, General de la Billiere took his family across the Nubian Desert by Land Rover to assume command of the British Army Training Team in Sudan in 1977 Between 1979 and 1983 he commanded the Special Air Service Group. He was made CBE- in the 1983 New Year's Honours List. During 1983 he was a member of the Royal College of Defence Studies and from June 1984 until July 1985 was Military Commissioner and Commander British Forces Falklands, where his wife and family were with him. From September 1985 to November 1987 he commanded Wales District in the rank of Major General and at the beginning of December 1986 was appointed Colonel Commandant of the Light Division. In 1987 he took up the appointment of GOG South East District and Permanent Peacetime Commander of the joint Force Operation Staff in the rank of Lieutenant General, He was appointed KCB in the 1988 New Year's Honours List. On October 6th 1990, General de la Billiere assumed command of the British Forces in the Middle East. Following his return to UK, he was promoted General and appointed as special adviser to the Ministry of Defence on Middle East matters.
The signature of Lieutenant Colonel John Wallace MBE RLC

Lieutenant Colonel John Wallace MBE RLC
*Signature Value : £35

Officer Commanding 12 Squadron Royal Corps of Transport
The signature of Major General Ian Durie CBE

Major General Ian Durie CBE
*Signature Value : £15

Commander Royal Artillery,1st British Armoured Division
The signature of Major General Rupert Smith DSO OBE QGM

Major General Rupert Smith DSO OBE QGM
*Signature Value : £35

General Officer Commanding 1st British Armoured Division
Artist Details : Michael Rondot
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Michael Rondot


Michael Rondot

Michael Rondot is well known in the military aviation world for his distinctive style of aircraft paintings and prints which have made him one of todays most widely collected aviation artists. During his 25 year career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force he flew over 5000 hours in combat jets, including Jaguar fighter bombers during the Gulf War, bringing a unique authority to his paintings that sets them in a class of their own. His portrayals of classic combat aircraft are much sought-after by both aviators and enthusiasts alike for their realism and powerful atmospheric settings.

More about Michael Rondot

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 As allied forces pressed inland towards Caen, the 21st panzer Division launched a counterattack along a narrow three mile corridor between the Canadians on Juno beach and the British on Sword. the charge led by fifty tanks of 22nd panzer regiment and supporting Panzer grenadiers was engaged on its eastern flank by heavy British anti tank fire and the bulk of the force was pinned down or destroyed. ultimately only six PZ IVs and a company of infantry mannered to reach the coast at lion sur mer. their stay however was short lived and within a few hours the arrival of the transports and gliders of the British 6th Airborne directly overhead forced the entire division to pull back for fear of being trapped.

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 The Battle of Aliwal was fought on 28th January 1846 between the British and the Sikhs.  The British were led by Sir Harry Smith, while the Sikhs were led by Ranjodh Singh Majithia.  The British won a victory which is sometimes regarded as the turning point of the First Anglo-Sikh War.  The Sikhs had occupied a position 4 miles (6.4 km) long, which ran along a ridge between the villages of Aliwal, on the Sutlej, and Bhundri.  The Sutlej ran close to their rear for the entire length of their line, making it difficult for them to manoeuvre and also potentially disastrous if they were forced to retreat.  After the initial artillery salvoes, Smith determined that Aliwal was the Sikh weak point.  He sent two of his four infantry brigades to capture the village, from where they could enfilade the Sikh centre.  They seized the village, and began pressing forwards to threaten the fords across the Sutlej.  As the Sikhs tried to swing back their left, pivoting on Bhundri, some of their cavalry tried to threaten the open British left flank.  A British and Indian cavalry brigade, led by the 16th Lancers, charged and dispersed them.  The 16th Lancers then attacked a large body of Sikh infantry.  These were battalions organised and trained in contemporary European fashion by Neapolitan mercenary, Paolo Di Avitabile.  They formed square to receive cavalry, as most European armies did.  Nevertheless, the 16th Lancers broke them, with heavy casualties.  The infantry in the Sikh centre tried to defend a nullah (dry stream bed), but were enfiladed and forced into the open by a Bengal infantry regiment, and then cut down by fire from Smith's batteries of Bengal Horse Artillery.  Unlike most of the battles of both Anglo-Sikh Wars, when the Sikhs at Aliwal began to retreat, the retreat quickly turned into a disorderly rout across the fords.  Most of the Sikh guns were abandoned, either on the river bank or in the fords, along with all baggage, tents and supplies.  They lost 2,000 men and 67 guns. <i><br><br>Comment from the artist, Jason Askew.</i><br><br>This painting shows the extremely violent and brutal clash between British cavalry (16th Lancers) and Sikh infantry at the battle of Aliwal.  The Sikh infantry formed 2 triangles, a version of the famous Allied/British squares used at Waterloo, but the Sikhs, after firing a ragged volley at the attacking horsemen, dropped their muskets and assaulted the cavalry with their traditional Tulwars (sabres) and dhal shields.  These shields are also used offensively, to punch, and to slice with the edge.  Although the British horsemen claimed a victory as they felt they successfully dispersed the Sikh triangles, and forced the Sikh infantry to retreat to the nullah (dry stream bed) in the Sikh rear, this opinion is open to debate.  The Sikhs traditionally fought in loose formations, with tulwar and shield-taking full advantage of their abilities as swordsmen, blades being weapons with which the Sikhs are particularly skilled in the use of.  The Sikhs actually inflicted more casualties on the 16th Lancers than the lancers inflicted on the Sikh infantry.  British eye witnesses spoke of the sight of the grotesquely swollen and distorted dead bodies of men and horses of the Her Majesty's 16th Lancers, stinking in the sun and littering the ground at Aliwal - testimony to the progress of their charge.  The regiment lost 27% of effectives out of a total strength of over 400 effectives.  The lancers were dreadfully hacked about, many being cruelly maimed for life, losing hands and limbs to the slashing strokes of the Sikh blades.  The Sikhs had no compassion for the cavalry horses either - many of the poor animals (over 100 by some accounts) had to be shot, due to having their legs hacked clean off, or being literally disemboweled by Sikh Tulwars.  In the painting, the central figure with the wizard-shaped Turban, is in fact an Akali - a sect of extremely religious Sikhs, who disdained the use of armour, and often fought to the death with a fanatical and suicidal devotion.

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Half Price! - £250.00
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Half Price! - £70.00
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