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Best Mate - Triple (Photographs)


Best Mate - Triple (Photographs)

SOLD OUT
Item Code : SSP0154Best Mate - Triple (Photographs) - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition reproduction of photographs.

Paper size 23.5 inches x 8.5 inches (60cm x 22cm)noneSOLD
OUT
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AVAILABLE
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


This Week's Half Price Art

<b>Ex-display prints in near perfect condition. </b>

King Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)
Half Price! - 25.00
 After suppressing the initial German defences, the Sherman Crab flail tank of Lance Sgt Johnson, 3 Troop C Squadron the 22nd Dragoons, 79th Armoured Division,  clears a path through a minefield to allow tanks of 27th Armoured Brigade, and men of 3rd Infantry Division to breakout  from the beaches. Fire support from surviving Sherman DD (amphibious) tanks of 13th /18th Hussars (QMO), proved invaluable in the initial push towards Caen

D-Day, Sword Beach, Normandy 1944 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
The Battle at Rorke's Drift, also known as the Defence of Rorke's Drift, was an action in the Anglo-Zulu War. The defence of the mission station of Rorke's Drift, under the command of Lieutenant John Chard of the Royal Engineers, immediately followed the British Army's defeat at the Battle of Isandlwana on 22nd January 1879, and continued into the following day, 23rd January.  150 British and colonial troops successfully defended the garrison against an intense assault by approximately 2000 Zulu warriors. The intense and noisy Zulu attacks on Rorke's Drift came very close to defeating the tiny garrison, but were ultimately repelled by blasts of Martini-Henry rifle fire-and some smart bayonet work-with some guts behind the bayonet thrusts! Eleven Victoria Crosses were awarded to the defenders, along with a number of other decorations and honours. Of particular note in the painting is the dog 'Pip' - he survived Isandlwhana by retreating along the fugitive's trail to Rorke's Drift. During the Zulu attacks on Rorke's drift, Pip did his part in the defence - by jumping on the mealie bag parapets and barking at Zulus- who were hiding in the long grass and sneaking up to the defences, then biting any Zulu who came within range. Unfortunately Pip was not officially recognised for his part in the action. He was not awarded a VC, on the basis that he was a volunteer canine that accompanied an officer, rather than a War Office issued canine. Conversely, if Pip had been killed, then he would not have been officially listed as a casualty, as he accompanied the army in a strictly private capacity. British army horses were in a different category as they were War Office issue, therefore the loss of a horse in action, or to disease, carried a financial liability for the War Office.

The Defence of Rorke's Drift by Jason Askew. (P)
Half Price! - 3200.00
 In 1275 BC there were two superpowers in the ancient near east, in the south the Egyptians and in the north the Hittites from Anatolia in modern day central Turkey.  A clash between these two powers was inevitable.  The Egyptian Pharaoh Rameses II marched an army north into Syria to confront the Hittites and their allies under King Muwatallis.  Reaching Kadesh Rameses camped under the walls of the city with his leading division, Amun, and awaited the arrival of the rest of his army.  Poor intelligence had led Rameses to believe the Hittites were far to the north, in fact they were only 2 - 3 miles away.  Muwatallis delivered a surprise attack against Rameses camp but the Egyptians managed to hold on until re-enforcements arrived.  Despite retreating from the field after a day long battle it was Rameses who claimed a victory.  The two armies never clashed again and eventually a peace treaty was signed between the Egyptians and the Hittites.

The Battle of Kadesh - circa 127 BC by Brian Palmer (P)
Half Price! - 1650.00

The battle was fought during the 1st Sikh War (1845-1846) between a force of 10,000 British and Indian troops under the command of General Sir Harry Smith and a 15,000 strong Sikh army led by Ranjur Singh.  The Sikh forces occupied an entrenched position between the villages of Aliwal and Bhundri, close to the River Sutlej.  Smith drove the Sikhs out of Aliwal with his infantry and then rolled up their line with cavalry and artillery support.  The 16th Lancers charged several times during the action, breaking a number of Sikh infantry squares and overrunning a battery of Sikh artillery.
The Charge of the 16th Lancers, at the Battle of Aliwal, by Orlando Norie.
Half Price! - 20.00
 Helmand Province, Afghanistan, July 2009.  Troops of the 2nd Mercian Regiment 19th Light Brigade engaged on compound searches during Operation Panchai Palang.

Green Zone Patrol by David Pentland.
Half Price! - 70.00
 Depicting the charge of the Lancers against what they first thought was a small group of Dervishes, but was in fact thousands hidden in a depression in the desert. The Lancers had to ride straight through. For this bravery three Victoria crosses were won. The 21st lancers lost 5 officers and 65 men with 120 horses lost. Winston Churchill was one of the Officers who survived the charge.

The Charge of the 21st Lancers at the Battle of Omdurman by Richard Caton Woodville. (Y)
Half Price! - 25.00
DHM691.  Sir Walter Raleigh by Chris Collingwood.

Sir Walter Raleigh by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - 35.00
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