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Little Friends by Simon Smith.


Little Friends by Simon Smith.

The aircraft in the foreground bears the name Alabama Rammer Jammer, the personal mount of 2/Lt Arthur Cundy ,352nd FS, 353rd FG. The 353rds yellow and black chequered nose bands were one of the most distinctive recognition features of all the Eighths fighter groups.
Item Code : DHM1464Little Friends by Simon Smith. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 500 prints.

Image size 25 inches x 17 inches (64cm x 43cm)Artist : Simon Smith£60 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £90.00

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EXCLUSIVE website offer from Cranston Fine Arts - FREE art print(s) supplied with the above item!


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FREE PRINT : Guardian Angel by Anthony Saunders.

This complimentary art print worth £50
(Size : 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm))
has been specially chosen by Cranston Fine Arts to complement the above edition, and will be sent FREE with your order.

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Other editions of this item : Little Friends by Simon Smith DHM1464
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of artist proofs. Image size 25 inches x 17 inches (64cm x 43cm)Artist : Simon Smith£15 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £125.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTBlakeslee Presentation Edition of 5 Artist Proofs, supplied double matted. Image size 25 inches x 17 inches (64cm x 43cm) Blakeslee, Don (matted)
+ Artist : Simon Smith
£300.00VIEW EDITION...
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Signed limited edition of 500 prints. (One copy reduced to clear)

Marks on the white border and some lighter marks on the image. Would not be noticed once framed.
Image size 25 inches x 17 inches (64cm x 43cm)Artist : Simon Smith£70 Off!Now : £30.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :



The Aircraft :
NameInfo
MustangThe ubiquitous North American P-51 Mustang, which many consider to be the best all-around fighter of WW II, owes its origins to the British Air Ministry. Following Britains entry into WW II in 1939, the RAF was interested in purchasing additional fighter aircraft from American sources, particularly the Curtiss P-40. Curtiss, which was busy, was unable to guarantee timely delivery so the British approached North American Aviation as a possible second source for the P-40. North American chose to propose its own fighter design which would use the same Allison engine as the P-40. Utilizing new laminar flow wings, the North American fighter was expected to have performance better than the P-40. Developed in record time the new aircraft was designated as a Mustang I by the Brits, whereas the USAAF ordered two for evaluation which were designated XP-51 Apaches. Intrigued with the possibility of using this aircraft also as a dive bomber, North American proposed this to the USAAF which decided to order 500 of the P-51 aircraft to be modified for dive bombing use. Designated as the A-36 Invader, this version of the Mustang utilized dive flaps, and bomb racks under each wing. Some reinforcing of the structural members was also required because of the G-forces to be encountered in dive bombing. A-36s entered combat service with the USAAF prior to any P-51s. In early 1943 the 86th and 27th Fighter Bomber Groups of the 12th Air Force began flying A-36s out of Northern Africa. Despite some early problems with instability caused by the dive flaps, the A-36 was effective in light bombing and strafing roles. It was not, however, capable of dog fighting with German fighters, especially at higher altitudes. Despite these drawbacks one USAAF pilot, Captain Michael T. Russo, who served with the 16th Bomb Squadron of the 27th Fighter Bomber Group, was credited with five confirmed aerial victories in the A-36, thereby becoming the first mustang ace.
Artist Details : Simon Smith
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Simon Smith


Simon Smith

Simon Smith was born in 1960 into a military family and quickly developed an interest in history and the armed forces. He has worked continually as an illustrator in the historical field since leaving art college in 1982, having graduated with a First in Fine Art and Illustration.. He has work on permanent display in London and countries as far afield as Taiwan and Israel. Simon owes his lifelong interest in military subjects to his family connections with the services.

More about Simon Smith

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