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Kiwi Strike by Nicolas Trudgian.


Kiwi Strike by Nicolas Trudgian.

A dramatic low-level attack on a Japanese base near Rabaul is in progress by F-4U Corsairs of 16 Squadron, RNZAF. Taking the lead is Bryan Cox, as the Corsairs leave a trail of smoke and debris in their wake. Water vapor is squeezed out of the humid atmosphere as Coxs wingman banks sharply to avoid groundfire. The Kiwi Corsairs buccaneered their way through the intensly fought campaigns in the Solomons and Guadalcanal.
Item Code : DHM2443Kiwi Strike by Nicolas Trudgian. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 800 prints.

Paper size 16 inches x 14 inches (41cm x 36cm) Cox, Bryan
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


Signature(s) value alone : £45
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HMS Anson at Sydney Harbour, July 1945 by Ivan Berryman.
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Titles in this pack :
Black Cat Rescue by Nicolas Trudgian.  (View This Item)
Invasion Force by Nicolas Trudgian.  (View This Item)
Kiwi Strike by Nicolas Trudgian.  (View This Item)
Trainbusters by Nicolas Trudgian.  (View This Item)
The Struggle for Malta by Ivan Berryman. (F)  (View This Item)
LCT 312 by Ivan Berryman. (D)  (View This Item)
Typhoons Over Normandy by Ivan Berryman. (D)  (View This Item)
Dinah Might by Ivan Berryman.  (View This Item)

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Other editions of this item : Kiwi Strike by Nicolas Trudgian DHM2443
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ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 80 artist proofs.

Only 20 copies available of this sold out edition.
Paper size 16 inches x 14 inches (41cm x 36cm) Cox, Bryan
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


Signature(s) value alone : £45
£10 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £95.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


Extra Details : Kiwi Strike by Nicolas Trudgian.
About all editions :



A photograph of an edition of the print.

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
The signature of Warrant Officer Bryan Cox

Warrant Officer Bryan Cox
*Signature Value : £45

Born in 1925, this New Zealand fighter pilot Bryan Cox flew Corsairs in the Pacific. On January 14th, 1945, 36 Kiwi Corsairs based on Green Island were sent to attack the Japanese base at Rabaul. Flight Lieutenant Francis George Keefe in one of the Corsairs was shot down by flak and his parachute was seen opening and landing in the water. The following day Bryan Cox along with fifteen other Corsair pilots of 14 sqd and 16 Sqd were sent on the rescue mission for Keefe, escorting a flying boat. A raft was dropped and the mission may have been a success, except Francis Keefe was picked up by a Japanese patrol boat, and died of gangrene from his many wounds 10 days later in a prison camp. Returning to base, the 16 Corsair pilots encountered a bad storm, but due to lack of fuel could not fly around the strom and instead had to go through it. Bryan Cox was separated from the rest of the Corsairs when his radio and light went out due to a cockpit failure and Bryan veered away in fear of a mid air collision, not managing to regain contact whith the others. Seven pilots were lost at sea, from 14 Sqd. Flight Lieutenant BS Hay, Flying Officer AN Saward, Flight Sergeant IJ Munro, Flight Sergeant JS McArthur, and from 16 Sqd, Flight Sergeant RW Albrecht, Flight Lieutenant TRF Johnson, and Flying Officer G. Randell. Bryan Cox with only minutes of fuel left and contemplating ditching finally saw the outline of Green Island and managed with not more than seconds of fuel remaining to land. After the war Bryan was to become one of New Zealands best known flying instructors, and he spent many years as Chief Instructor at Ardmore, now a popular civil aerodrome which was the same airfield that Cox had been based at flying the Corsairs. Following the end of the war, Bryan had served in J Force, with No.14 Squadron RNZAF flying duties in Japan. He was an early observer to the horrors of Hiroshima. He served there untill 1947, and is secretary of the New Zealand fighter pilots association.
The Aircraft :
NameInfo
CorsairThe Chance-Vought F4U Corsair was arguably the finest naval aviation fighter of its era. Work on this design dates to 1938 and was headed-up by Voughts Chief Engineer, Rex Biesel. The initial prototype was powered by an 1800-HP Pratt & Whitney double Wasp radial engine. This was the third Vought aircraft to carry the Corsair name. The graceful and highly recognizable gull-wing design of the F4U permitted the aircraft to utilize a 13-foot, three-blade, Hamilton Standard propeller, while not having to lengthen the landing gear. Because of the rigors of carrier landings, this was a very important design consideration. Folding wings were also required for carrier operations. The F4U was thirty feet long, had a wingspan of 41 feet and an empty weight of approximately 7,500 pounds. Another interesting feature was the way the F4Us gear rotated 90 degrees, so it would lay flush within the wing when in the up position. In 1939 the Navy approved the design, and production commenced. The Corsair utilized a new spot welding process on its all aluminum fuselage, giving the aircraft very low drag. To reduce weight, fabric-covered outer wing sections and control surfaces were fitted. In May of 1940 the F4U made its maiden flight. Although a number of small bugs were discovered during early flight tests, the Corsair had exceptional performance characteristics. In October of 1940 the prototype F4U was clocked at 405-MPH in a speed test. The initial production Corsairs received an upgraded 2,000-HP radial giving the bird a top speed of about 425-MPH. The production models also differed from the prototype in having six, wing-mounted, 0.5 caliber machine guns. Another change was a shift of the cockpit about three feet further back in the fuselage. This latter change unfortunately made naval aviators wary of carrier landings with the F4U, due to its limited forward visibility during landings. Other concerns were expressed regarding a severe port wing drop at landing speeds and a tendency of the aircraft to bounce off a carrier deck. As a result, the F4U was initially limited to land-based USMC squadrons. Vought addressed several of these problems, and the Royal Navy deserves credit for perfecting an appropriate landing strategy for the F4U. They found that if the carrier pilot landed the F4U while making a sweeping left turn with the port wing down, that sufficient visibility was available to make a safe landing. With a kill ratio of 11 -to- 1 in WW 11 combat, the F4U proved superior in the air to almost every opposing aircraft it encountered. More than 12,000 F4Us were built and fortunately a few dozen remain in flyable condition to this date.
Artist Details : Nicolas Trudgian
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Nicolas Trudgian


Nicolas Trudgian

Cranston Fine Arts have now taken over all remaining stocks of Nicolas Trudgian prints from his previous publishers. We have made available a great many prints that had not been seen for many years, and have uncovered some rarities which lay unnoticed during this transition.

Having graduated from art college, Nicolas Trudgian spent many years as a professional illustrator before turning to a career in fine art painting. His crisp style of realism, attention to detail, compositional skills and bright use of colours, immediately found favour with collectors and demand for his original work soared on both sides of the Atlantic. Today, more than a decade after becoming a fine art painter, Nicolas Trudgian is firmly established within a tiny, elite group of aviation artists whose works are genuinely collected world-wide. When he paints an aircraft you can be sure he has researched it in every detail and when he puts it over a particular airfield, the chances are he has paid it a recent visit. Even when he paints a sunset over a tropical island, or mist hanging over a valley in China, most probably he has seen it with his own eyes. Nick was born and raised in the seafaring city of Plymouth, the port from which the Pilgrim Fathers set sail in 1620, and where Sir Francis Drake played bowls while awaiting the Spanish Armada. Growing up in a house close to the railway station within a busy military city, the harbour always teeming with naval vessels and the skies above resonating with the sounds of naval aircraft, it was not at all surprising the young Nick became fascinated with trains, boats and aircraft. It was from his father, himself a talented artist, that Nick acquired his love of drawing and surrounded by so much that was inspiring, there was never a shortage of ideas for pictures. His talent began to show at an early age and although he did well enough at school, he always spent a disproportionate amount of time drawing. People talked about him becoming a Naval officer or an architect but in 1975 Nick's mind was made up. When he told his careers teacher he wanted to go to art school the man said, 'Now come on, what do you really want to do? After leaving school Nick began a one-year foundation course at the Plymouth College of Art. Now armed with an impressive portfolio containing paintings of jet aircraft, trains, even wildlife, he was immediately accepted at every college he applied to join. He chose a course at the Falmouth College of Art in Cornwall specialising in technical illustration and paintings of machines and vehicles for industry. It was perfect for Nick, and he was to become one of the star pupils. One of the lecturers commented at the time: Every college needs someone with a talent like Nick to raise the standards sky high; he carried all the other students along with him, and created an effect which will last for years to come. Two weeks after leaving art college Nick blew every penny he had on a trip to South Africa to ride the great steam trains across the desert, sketching them at every opportunity. Returning to England, in best traditions of all young artists, he struggled to make a living. Paintings by an unknown artist didn't fetch much despite the painstaking effort and time Nick put into each work, so when the college he had recently left offered him a job as a lecturer, he jumped at the chance. The money was good and he discovered that he really enjoyed teaching. Throughout the 1970s Nick was much involved with a railway preservation society near Plymouth and it was through the railway society that he had his first pictures reproduced as prints. But Nick felt he needed to advance his career and in summer 1985 Nick moved away from Cornwall to join an energetic new design studio in Wiltshire. Here he painted detailed artwork for many major companies including Rolls Royce, General Motors, Volvo Trucks, Alfa Romeo and, to his delight, the aviation and defence industries. He remembers the job as exciting though stressful, often requiring him to work right through the night to meet a client's deadline. Here he learned to be disciplined and fast. Towards the end of the 1980's Nick had the chance to work for the Military Gallery. This was the break that for years he had been striving towards and with typical enthusiasm, flung himself into his new role. After completing a series of aviation posters, including a gigantic painting to commemorate the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Royal Air Force, Nick's first aviation scene to be published as a limited edition was launched by the Military Gallery in 1991. Despite the fact he was unknown in the field, it was an immediate success. Over the past decade Nick has earned a special reputation for giving those who love his work much more than just aircraft in his paintings. He goes to enormous lengths with his backgrounds, filling them with interesting and accurate detail, all designed to help give the aircraft in his paintings a tremendous sense of location and purpose. His landscapes are quite breathtaking and his buildings demonstrate an uncanny knowledge of perspective but it is the hardware in his paintings which are most striking. Whether it is an aircraft, tank, petrol bowser, or tractor, Nick brings it to life with all the inordinate skill of a truly accomplished fine art painter. A prodigious researcher, Nick travels extensively in his constant quest for information and fresh ideas. He has visited India, China, South Africa, South America, the Caribbean and travels regularly to the United States and Canada. He likes nothing better than to be out and about with sketchbook at the ready and if there is an old steam train in the vicinity, well that's a bonus!

More about Nicolas Trudgian

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