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A P McCoy by Gary Keane.


A P McCoy by Gary Keane.

Item Code : SPC0426A P McCoy by Gary Keane. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 350 prints. Paper size 21.5 inches x 15.5 inches (55cm x 40cm) McCoy, A P
+ Artist : Gary Keane
20 Off!Now : 84.00

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Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
The signature of A P McCoy

A P McCoy
*Signature Value : 25

Jockey.
Artist Details : Gary Keane
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Gary Keane


Gary Keane

Gary Keane is one of the leading sporting artists in the UK. He initially worked as a freelance illustrator on various newspapers in Fleet Street, working for 20 years at the Daily Mail producing illustrations for the section called Focus on Fact and also The Gary Player Golf Strip for the Sunday Express. Gary Keane also produced illustrations for advertising, and finished artwork for various book publishers, including Penguin, Corgi, Transworld and many others through Artists Partners, a major UK arists agency. As his career moved forward he received a number of commissions for sporting paintings and many turned into limited edition sporting prints including artwork of leading sports stars such as Sir Alex Ferguson, Michael Atherton, Ian Wright, Sir Garfield Sobers, Sir Stirling Moss, Jimmy Greaves and Ellen MacArthur.

More about Gary Keane

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