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Cold War Gone Hot by David Pentland.


Cold War Gone Hot by David Pentland.

Hypothetical engagement, Soviet airforce MIG19 shoots down a USAF RB47 Stratofortress during the 1960s.
Item Code : DHM0799Cold War Gone Hot by David Pentland. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 1000 prints.

Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm)Artist : David PentlandHalf
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Now : £35.00

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Skirmish Over Stalluponen by David Pentland.
for £120 -
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Cold War Intercept by Keith Aspinall.
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Other editions of this item : Cold War Gone Hot by David Pentland. DHM0799
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm)Artist : David Pentland£10 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £90.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : David Pentland
on separate certificate
£90 Off!Now : £370.00VIEW EDITION...
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting by David Pentland. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : David Pentland£2200.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :




The Aircraft :
NameInfo
StratofortressThe Boeing B-52 Stratofortress has played a major role in Americas defense for nearly forty years. In his dramatic painting appropriately entitled B-52s: They Keep On Ticking, aviation artist Stan Stokes depicts an early big-tailed B-52B and a more contemporary B-52G which saw service during Operation Desert Storm. The origins of the development of the B-52 begins way back in the early 1940s. All major aircraft companies were interested in developing the first truly intercontinental bomber. Shortly after WW II the Convair XB-36 and the Northrop XB-35 were developed, and both had intercontinental range. However, neither of these aircraft were capable of penetrating deep into Soviet airspace, and defense planners in the early 1950s presumed that the Soviets would be our prime adversaries for years to come. In 1946 the Air Force issued a requirement for its next generation of strategic bombers. Required was a range of at least 5,000 miles with a minimum 10,000 pound bomb load, a top speed in excess of 450 MPH and an operational ceiling of at least 40,000 feet. Boeing entered this competition with the XB-52 which incorporated six turboprop engines. Part way into prototype development, Boeings designers decided to scrap this design in favor of a swept wing jet powered aircraft. The first XB-52 was rolled out in November of 1951. One major change in the prototype was a complete redesign of the forward fuselage to allow the pilots to sit side-by-side. The B-52B was the first true production model of the Stratofortress. It became operational in 1955 with the Strategic Air Command. On January 16, 1957 SAC demonstrated the amazing capabilities of the B-52 with a non-stop around the world flight covering over 24,000 miles in 45 hours and 19 minutes. The B-52B was phased out in the mid 1960s. The B-52C was the first of these aircraft to be painted gloss white on its entire underside to reflect the heat from nuclear blasts. The C remained in service until 1971. The B-52D saw significant service in Vietnam. Many of these models were modified to carry up to as many as 108 conventional bombs. During a major offensive strike at Hanoi in December 1972 a total of 729 B-52 sorties were flown. Only 15 aircraft were lost, despite the fact that Hanoi was heavily protected with SAMs and anti-aircraft batteries. The B-52G was the first of the short tail models. The manned rear gun turret was removed on these models, and the fuel capacity was significantly increased. The G model was the first of the B-52s to carry cruise missiles, a development which significantly lengthened the useful service life of this aircraft. The B-52G is, like its predecessors, a very large aircraft with a wingspan in excess of 185 feet, and a maximum take off weight of 488,000 pounds. With a range in excess of 7,000 miles and a maximum speed of 634 MPH, the Gs were successfully utilized in the Gulf War, and no doubt will continue to see service for many more years into the future. The B-52 is clearly one of the most unique of all post-WW II military aircraft, and it is interesting to note that it is one of only a very few aircraft designs which is older than most of the pilots who fly it.
MiG19
Artist Details : David Pentland
Click here for a full list of all artwork by David Pentland


David Pentland

Latest info : After spending most of 2008 and first part of 2009 working on a series of Star Wars painting, all of which have been sold, David has since been working on a series of original pencil drawings. At the time of writing, the first 30 or so are available. All of the drawings carry original signatures of German Knights Cross holders and a selection have been matted to include the signatures of other, now deceased, Knights Cross holders. Most of these original pencil drawings have also been produced as very limited edition art prints.

One of Europe's Leading Military and Aviation Artists, David Pentland has produced a wealth of Paintings for Cranston Fine arts, who are proud to have David as one of their leading Artists. As you browse down his wonderful work you may be interested to know that many of the Paintings are still available, and to a collector his work would certainly be a valuable addition. David's Paintings have gone up in value over the past 2 years, and have seen a growth in value of nearly 100%.



David with one of his original paintings in the originals gallery at Cranston Fine Arts, and at a print signing session with a print of one of his pencil drawings.

More about David Pentland

This Week's Half Price Art

Lancaster CF-X (LM384) of 625 Squadron.  On the Leipzig raid on the evening of 19th/20th February 1944 approx 47 Lancasters were shot down or failed to return, that is over 300 airmen.  Lancaster CF-X (LM384) was taking part in the bombing raids that were a build up to the D-Day landings of June 1944.  Leipzig was seen as a high value target due to its oil and synthetic fuel production.  The Lancaster took off from Kelstern in Lincolnshire just before midnight.  Unfortunately LM384 did not come back as was the case with many others - the aircraft was lost and crashed just outside the tiny village of Bledeln in Germany.  The Pastor of the village, Herr Duncker, kept a diary throughout the war and has an account of the plane crash and the subsequent burial of the crew.  All of the crew died in the crash except one - bomb aimer George Paterson who was interned in Stalag 357 Kopernikus.  The rest of the crew were given a Christian burial and stayed there until the end of the war, when the war graves commission disinterred the crew and reburied them in the Hannover war cemetery.

Last Long Shadow by Anthony Saunders. (B)
Half Price! - £50.00
 The early months of 1942 saw Sqn Ldr Derek Ward flying several sorties a day, many of them at night with 73 Sqn in the skies above Egypt. He claimed a Heinkel 111 destroyed on 9th February and a Bf.109 just a few days later. Then, on the night of 1st May, Ward spotted a Focke-Wulf Fw.200 Condor heading out to sea. Alone, he pursued the German four-engined bomber in his Hurricane and shot it down, flames streaming from its wing. For this action, Sqn Ldr Ward was awarded the DFC.

Tribute to Squadron Leader Derek Ward by Ivan Berryman. (C)
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 Two British Army AH1 Apache attack helicopters escort a Boeing Chinook en route to deploy British troops in southern Afghanistan.

Outbound by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £1750.00
After take off a Sunderland of Coastal Command flies low over its base at Rosneath on the Gareloch, as Royal Navy battleships lay at anchor around the naval base of Faslane, near Helensburgh, Scotland during 1945.

Sunderland Over the Gareloch by Geoff Lea (P)
Half Price! - £1200.00

 RAF Hastings drop men of 3 PARA battalion on the Egyptian airfield of El Gamil as part of the Airborne element of Operation Musketeer, (Anglo-French plan to re-open the Suez Canal after its closure by Egyptian President Nasser) Carried to their target by 18 Valettas and 9 Hastings of RAF Transport Command, and supported by Air strikes by Fleet Air Arm Sea Venoms and Seahawks they quickly succeeded in securing their objective.

Suez Drop, 5th November 1956 by David Pentland. (P)
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 One of 6,176 Halifaxes built during World War II, NA337(2P-X) was shot down over Norway on 23rd April 1945.  In 1995 it was recovered from the lake that had been its watery home for fifty years and has now been restored by the Halifax Aircraft Association in Ontario, Canada.

Halifax Mk.III NA337†by Ivan Berryman. (E)
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 Erich Lowenhardt was already the holder of the Knights Cross 1st and 2nd Class for acts of bravery even before becoming a pilot. After serving as an observer for a year, he was eventually posted to Jasta 10 in 1917 where he immediately began to score victories, sending down balloons and enemy aircraft at a fearsome rate. He was appointed Commander of Jasta 10 one week before his 21st birthday, making him one the youngest pilots to rise to such a rank in the German Army Air Service. He continued to increase his score steadily throughout 1917 and 1918, but was involved in a mid-air collision with a Jasta 11 aircraft on 10th August. Lowenhardt elected to abandon his aircraft, but his parachute failed to deploy and the young ace fell to his death. He flew a number of aircraft, but this yellow-fuselaged Fokker D.VII was his most distinctive and is believed to be the aircraft in which he was killed. His final victory total was 54.

Oberleutnant Erich Lowenhardt by Ivan Berryman. (B)
Half Price! - £50.00
 On Stalins personal orders, Petlyako PE-8 bombers, led by the hero of the Soviet Union, Major General Mikhal V. Vodopyanov, carry out their only raid on the German capital of Berlin.

Red Stars Over Berlin, 12th August 1941 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £35.00
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