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Swordfish Attack at Taranto by Robert Taylor.


Swordfish Attack at Taranto by Robert Taylor.

On November 11, 1940 a group of 21 slow, outdated Swordfish biplanes attacked and crippled the Italian Fleet in the heavily defended port of Taranto. One of the most daring raids of World War II captured in this print for posterity.
Item Code : DHM2174Swordfish Attack at Taranto by Robert Taylor. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 1500 prints.

Last 25 copies of this sold out edition.
Paper size 24 inches x 20 inches (61cm x 51cm) Lamb, Charles
Janvrin, Hugh Dick
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £125
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Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £125.00

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Raid on Taranto by Anthony Saunders
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Other editions of this item : Swordfish Attack at Taranto by Robert Taylor. DHM2174
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Signed limited edition of 1500 prints. (Two prints reduced to clear)

Prints have small marks on white border at bottom and a small dent across the bottom right border.

Great value : Value of signatures exceeds price of item!
Paper size 24 inches x 20 inches (61cm x 51cm) Lamb, Charles
Janvrin, Hugh Dick
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £125
£80 Off!Now : £60.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


Extra Details : Swordfish Attack at Taranto by Robert Taylor.
About all editions :


Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
Commander Charles Lamb DSO DSC Royal Navy (deceased)
*Signature Value : £65

Charles Lamb was born on 11 April 1914 in Bolton, Lancashire. He joined the merchant navy in 1930, and the Royal Naval Reserve in March 1933, serving aboard HMS Rodney, and competing on several occasions as a boxer. Commander Charles Lamb was to become a legend in the Royal Navy during World War II. He was one of the small bands of men who flew the slow cumbersome Swordfish bi-plane nicknamed Stringbags, all but declared obsolete before the war, but whose heroic actions changed the course of the war. Charles Lamb was the last to land on HMS Courageous before she was sunk in September 1939 and flew in the thick of the action, from mine-laying and U-boat hunting over northern Europe, harrying E-boats at Dunkirk, to being one of the two Swordfish Pathfinder pilots with 815 Squadron FAA at the Battle of Taranto.He joined 842 Naval Air Squadron then 781 Naval Air Squadron before serving on the carriers HMS Implacable and HMS Indefatigable from 1944 - 1945. Sadly, Charles Lamb died 28th May 1981.
Vice-Admiral Sir Hugh Dick Janvrin KCB CB DSO Royal Navy (deceased)
*Signature Value : £60

Dick Janvrin joined the Royal Navy as a Cadet in 1929, working his way up the service before joining the fleet Air Arm before the war. He became a qualified FAA Observer, flying Swordfish. He was in the front line of some of the most daring Swordfish missions, including the legendary attack at Taranto, where he flew as Observer with 815 Squadron on the lead Pathfinder aircraft. After the war Dick Janvrin commanded several warships, including HMS Broadsword, and the aircraft carrier HMS victorious. He died on 15th January 1993.
The Aircraft :
NameInfo
SwordfishTorpedo bomber and reconnaissance biplane, crewed by three, with a top speed of 154mph, reduced to 136mph as a float plane. Maximum ceiling 19,000 feet, reduced as a float plane. Armed with a .303 Vickers machine gun fixed forward and one in the rear cockpit. One 1610lb torpedo or up to 1500lb bomb load. At the outbreak of world war two the fleet air arm had 13 operational squadrons. The Fairey Swordfish has earned its place in history for major contributions to naval warfare, during the Norwegian campaign, and especially during the raid on Taranto. In November1940, twenty Swordfish took off from HMS Illustrious to attack the Italian fleet in their Harbour of Taranto. At Least nine torpedoes hit their targets. Seven Italian ships were badly damaged including the battleships, Caio Duillio, Littorio and Conte De Cavour. This was followed in February 1942, by a heroic but suicidal attack on German battlecruisers in the English Channel by six Swordfish of 825 squadron from RAF Manston. All aircraft and crews were lost. This resulted in a Victoria Cross for the leader Lieutenant Commander E Esmonde. The next major event was the torpedo attack on the Bismarck by Swordfish from HMS Ark Royal, which badly damaged the steering gear of the Bismarck which helped in the final destruction of the German battleship by Royal Navy battleships. The Fairey Swordfish was also used in anti-submarine and anti-shipping roles. The Swordfish sunk more enemy ships (by tonnage) than any other aircraft acting in the same role. By the end of the war the Fleet Air Arm still had nine active squadrons, but these were finally disbanded in May 1945. A total of 2399 Swordfish were built.
Artist Details : Robert Taylor
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Robert Taylor


Robert Taylor

The name Robert Taylor has been synonymous with aviation art over a quarter of a century. His paintings of aircraft, more than those of any other artist, have helped popularise a genre which at the start of this remarkable artist's career had little recognition in the world of fine art. When he burst upon the scene in the mid-1970s his vibrant, expansive approach to the subject was a revelation. His paintings immediately caught the imagination of enthusiasts and collectors alike . He became an instant success. As a boy, Robert seemed always to have a pencil in his hand. Aware of his natural gift from an early age, he never considered a career beyond art, and with unwavering focus, set out to achieve his goal. Leaving school at fifteen, he has never worked outside the world of art. After two years at the Bath School of Art he landed a job as an apprentice picture framer with an art gallery in Bath, the city where Robert has lived and worked all his life. Already competent with water-colours the young apprentice took every opportunity to study the works of other artists and, after trying his hand at oils, quickly determined he could paint to the same standard as much of the art it was his job to frame. Soon the gallery was selling his paintings, and the owner, recognising Roberts talent, promoted him to the busy picture-restoring department. Here, he repaired and restored all manner of paintings and drawings, the expertise he developed becoming the foundation of his career as a professional artist. Picture restoration is an exacting skill, requiring the ability to emulate the techniques of other painters so as to render the damaged area of the work undetectable. After a decade of diligent application, Robert became one of the most capable picture restorers outside London. Today he attributes his versatility to the years he spent painstakingly working on the paintings of others artists. After fifteen years at the gallery, by chance he was introduced to Pat Barnard, whose military publishing business happened also to be located in the city of Bath. When offered the chance to become a full-time painter, Robert leapt at the opportunity. Within a few months of becoming a professional artist, he saw his first works in print. Roberts early career was devoted to maritime paintings, and he achieved early success with his prints of naval subjects, one of his admirers being Lord Louis Mountbatten. He exhibited successfully at the Royal Society of Marine Artists in London and soon his popularity attracted the attention of the media. Following a major feature on his work in a leading national daily newspaper he was invited to appear in a BBC Television programme. This led to a string of commissions for the Fleet Air Arm Museum who, understandably, wanted aircraft in their maritime paintings. It was the start of Roberts career as an aviation artist. Fascinated since childhood by the big, powerful machines that man has invented, switching from one type of hardware to another has never troubled him. Being an artist of the old school, Robert tackled the subject of painting aircraft with the same gusto as with his large, action-packed maritime pictures - big compositions supported by powerful and dramatic skies, painted on large canvases. It was a formula new to the aviation art genre, at the time not used to such sweeping canvases, but one that came naturally to an artist whose approach appeared to have origins in an earlier classical period. Roberts aviation paintings are instantly recognisable. He somehow manages to convey all the technical detail of aviation in a traditional and painterly style, reminiscent of the Old Masters. With uncanny ability, he is able to recreate scenes from the past with a carefully rehearsed realism that few other artists ever manage to achieve. This is partly due to his prodigious research but also his attention to detail: Not for him shiny new factory-fresh aircraft looking like museum specimens. His trade mark, flying machines that are battle-scarred, worse for wear, with dings down the fuselage, chips and dents along the leading edges of wings, oil stains trailing from engine cowlings, paintwork faded with dust and grime; his planes are real! Roberts aviation works have drawn crowds in the international arena since the early 1980s. He has exhibited throughout the US and Canada, Australia, Japan and in Europe. His one-man exhibition at the Smithsonians National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC was hailed as the most popular art exhibition ever held there. His paintings hang in many of the worlds great aviation museums, adorn boardrooms, offices and homes, and his limited edition prints are avidly collected all around the world. A family man with strong Christian values, Robert devotes most of what little spare time he has to his home life. Married to Mary for thirty five years, they have five children, all now grown up. Neither fame nor fortune has turned his head. He is the same easy-going, gentle character he was when setting out on his painting career all those years ago, but now with a confidence that comes with the knowledge that he has mastered his profession.

More about Robert Taylor

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