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Titanics Last Sunrise by Adrian Rigby.


Titanics Last Sunrise by Adrian Rigby.

The elegant but ill-fated jewel in the White Star crown Titanic was a technical marvel of engineering in its day. At 882 ft long, her perfect proportions and magnificent profile were the envy of other shipping companies. Her tragic loss on her maiden voyage was a crushing blow to the White Star Line that left the whole world in shock.
Item Code : FAR0789Titanics Last Sunrise by Adrian Rigby. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print.

SOLD OUT (43, May 2010)
Image size 24 inches x 10 inches (61cm x 25cm)noneSOLD
OUT
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Artist Details : Adrian Rigby
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Adrian Rigby


Adrian Rigby

Born in 1962 in Lancashire, Adrian Rigby is a prize-winning wildlife artist who discovered his passion for wildlife and nature at a young age. He spends a great deal of time out in the field collecting, observing and noting changes to nature according to the varying seasons and paints mainly with oil and gouache.

More about Adrian Rigby

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