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Victory and Squadron in Light Airs by Geoff Hunt


Victory and Squadron in Light Airs by Geoff Hunt

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Item Code : LI0024Victory and Squadron in Light Airs by Geoff Hunt - This Edition
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Artist Details : Geoff Hunt
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Geoff Hunt


Geoff Hunt

Geoff Hunt is one of the leading marine artists of his generation. After formal art school training, Geoff Hunt worked in marine publishing where he acquired a love of marine history. A member of the Royal Society of Marine Artists since 1989, and a Trustee since 1992, he was responsible for the RSMA's book A Celebration of Marine Art and The Tall Ship in Art. His work hangs in public and private collections around the world. There are 12 of his paintings in the Royal Naval Museum in Portsmouth.

More about Geoff Hunt

This Week's Half Price Art

 The key to Nelsons victories always lay in his meticulous planning and the Battle of Copenghagen was no exception as he used his fleet to first destroy the Danish floating defences so that his bomb vessels could be brought up to bombard the city itself. The Danes eventually capitulated, but they had fought hard and over 2,000 men had died on both sides before the end of the battle. In this view, HMS Elephant, carrying the flag of Vice Admiral Horatio Nelson, dominates the scene as the battle gathers intensity. British ships depicted, left to right, are the Glatton (54), Elephant (74), Ganges (74) and Monarch (74)

The Battle of Copenhagen, 2nd April 1801 by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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Bartholomew Roberts was born in Wales in the village of Little Newcastle which lies between Fishguard and Haverfordwest in Pembroekshire in 1682.  His name was originally John Roberts, but he took up the name of Bartholomew Roberts which he may have taken after hearing of a well known pirate Bartholomew Sharp.  It is believed in 1695 at the age of 13 Bartholomew Roberts went to sea but was not heard of until 1718 when he was a mate on a Barbados Sloop. In the following year he served on a slave ship the Princess of London as the third mate serving under Captain Abraham Plumb.  In June 1718 the Princess of London was captured by two pirate shipe, the Royal Rover and the Royal James as she lay at anchor at Anomabu on the Gold Coast.  The pirates were led by a Welshman named Captain Howell Davis.  It seems that Davis liked Roberts who along with many of the crew of the Princess of London joined the pirates.  Roberts soon showed his worth as a good navigator, and would often talk to Davis in welsh so that the other pirates would not understand their conversation.  Bartholomew Roberts pirate career latest between 1719 and 1722  and he was the most successful pirate of this period, capturing over 470 ships, far more ships than some of the best-known pirates of this era such as Blackbeard and Captain Kidd.  Although never used during his life time he is now often refered to as Black Bart.  Captain Roberts was killed on the 10th of February 1722 ,  at Cape Lopez while trying to avoid and escape the British warship HMS Swallow.  He was killed by grapeshot fired form the Swallow - while standing on the deck was hit in the throat.  His wish was to be buried at sea and his crew quickly wrapped his body in sail and weighted it down, so that it would not be captured by the British.  His body was never found.
Bartholomew Roberts (Black Bart) by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - 40.00
B151.  HMS Durban Escorts the Troopship RMS Queen Mary by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Durban Escorts the Troopship RMS Queen Mary by Ivan Berryman.
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Bismarck, now complete and newly painted in full Baltic camouflage, returns to Hamburg for the last time as the harsh winter of 1940/41 relents and the pride of the German Kriegsmarine prepares for real action.  In the distance, the pre-Dreadnought Schleswig-Holstein awaits her next commission, the old ship alternating between vital ice-breaker and air defence duties at this time.  The Bismarck would in May 1941 put to sea and engage and sink HMS Hood only to be caught by the British battleships Rodney and King George V.  Bismarck was pounded into a floating wreck, finally being sunk by the torpedoes of HMS Dorsetshire.  From her crew of 2300 only 110 would be rescued by HMS Dorsetshire and HMS Maori.

Bismarck Entering Hamburg Harbour by Ivan Berryman
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 HMS Glorious flying off a Fairey Swordfish at sunset with HMS Ardent off to Starboard.

HMS Glorious by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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 Designed by the great Ernst Heinkel, the diminutive D.1 was an essential stop-gap that provided the Austro-Hungarian pilots with a front line fighter until they were able to re-equip with Albatros scouts in the Summer of 1917. This little aircraft performed well and was generally held in high regard by its pilots, although it did have some shortcomings, namely that forward vision was extremely limited and the Schwarzloses gun was completely concealed in the overwing pod that made it inaccessible in the air. Most unusual of all was its interplane strut arrangement, designed to reduce drag, which gave it the nicknames Starstrutter or Spider. These examples are shown passing above the German cruiser Derfflinger.

Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 The newly converted Command Helicopter Cruiser HMS Blake leaves Grand Harbour Malta at the end of the 1960s.  In the background, the old Submarine Depot ship HMS Forth lies at anchor at the very end of her long career.

HMS Blake by Ivan Berryman.
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 The Flower Class corvette HMS Sunflower at sea in 1942. One of thirty ordered on 31st August 1939, K41 was built by Smiths Dockyard in just 9 months and 6 days, completed on 25th January 1941.

HMS Sunflower by Ivan Berryman.
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