Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

Product Search        

Victory Breaks the Enemy Line by Geoff Hunt.


Victory Breaks the Enemy Line by Geoff Hunt.

Nelsons long-considered plan for dealing with a numerically superior force involved breaking their line in two places with two squadrons, the spearheads of each squadron being his biggest ships. The two squadrons were to attack the enemy line at right-angles, relying on breaking through quickly and then turning to overwhelm separated sections of their fleet before the remainder could turn back to intervene. The situation at Trafalgar did indeed produce a superior enemy force, 33 French and Spanish battleships to Nelsons 27, and the stage was set for his plan to be implemented. One of the two British squadrons was to be spearheaded by the Royal Sovereign, the other by Victory herself, although he had other heavy ships which could have led the way. But Nelson had not foreseen the very light wind and the consequent agonisingly slow approach, slower than walking pace, on the actual day. Victory took an awful pounding before she ever arrived at the Franco-Spanish line.The mizzen topmast was shot away, as was the ships wheel, which meant that she had to be steered by tiller in the gunroom, with instructions shouted down from on deck. Her crew already had casualties of twenty officers and men dead, thirty wounded, before she could fire a shot in reply. Nevertheless the pivotal moment finally arrived, as seen in this painting. Victory, her guns silent until now, is just about to pass under the stern of the French flagship, Admiral Villeneuves Bucentaure. The ships are so close that Victorys yardarm brushes the French Ships rigging. As Victory passes she fires her port broadside of fifty cannons and one carronade through Bucentaures transom and stern windows, the most vulnerable part of any sailing warship, sweeping the decks from end to end. This shattering blow which is thought to have dismounted twenty guns and killed or injured four hundred men, virtually knocked the French flagship out of the fight. Entering from the left is the 74-gun Redoutable, commanded by the formidable Captain Lucas, who had trained his crew to the highest pitch in fighting at close quarters. Victory will very shortly find herself alongside Redoutable, from which the shot is fired that kills Nelson.
Item Code : LI0042Victory Breaks the Enemy Line by Geoff Hunt. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 850 prints.

SOLD OUT.
Image size 17 inches x 23 inches (43cm x 58cm)Artist : Geoff HuntSOLD
OUT
NOT
AVAILABLE
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Artist Details : Geoff Hunt
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Geoff Hunt


Geoff Hunt

Geoff Hunt is one of the leading marine artists of his generation. After formal art school training, Geoff Hunt worked in marine publishing where he acquired a love of marine history. A member of the Royal Society of Marine Artists since 1989, and a Trustee since 1992, he was responsible for the RSMA's book A Celebration of Marine Art and The Tall Ship in Art. His work hangs in public and private collections around the world. There are 12 of his paintings in the Royal Naval Museum in Portsmouth.

More about Geoff Hunt

This Week's Half Price Art

 Wearing her unusual black and white disruptive colour scheme, HMS Repulse is pictured as part of Force Z in company with HMS Prince of Wales and the destroyer Vampire. These two mighty battleships were to be lost within hours of each other, the victims of intense Japanese air strikes. Vampire and the destroyer Electra were on hand to pick up survivors from both ships.

HMS Repulse by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £65.00
On Sunday October 25th 1992, HMS Vanguard, the Royal Navys first Trident equipped submarine, arrived off the Clyde Submarine Base, Faslane on the Gareloch. She was escorted by a Sea King helicopter from HMS Gannet, the RN shore base at Prestwick Airport, and a mixed surface flotilla, including Defence Police and Royal Marines.

Trident by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £45.00
 Key ships of the British task force sail in close formation in the Mediterranean sea during the build up to the coalition invasion of Iraq in march 2003, nearest is the flagship HMS Ark Royal with the commando carrier HMS ocean to her port side. other ships include a Type 42 destroyer , the Fleet Auxiliary Fort Victoria and an LSL††

NTG03 - Task Force to Iraq by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
 Sunset over Aboukir Bay on 1st August 1798 as ships of the Royal Navy, led by Nelson, conduct their ruthless destruction of the anchored French fleet. Ships shown from left to right. HMS Orion, Spartiate, Aquilon, Peuple Souvrain, HMS Defence, HMS Minotaur and HMS Swiftsure.

Battle of the Nile by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £325.00

 Completed in May 1941, HMS Victorious had been in commission just nine days when her pilots encountered and attacked the Bismarck. She is seen here in August 1942 with HMS Eagle astern of her.

HMS Victorious by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £30.00
In the spring of 1942, USS Washington was the first of Americas fast battleship fleet to participate in combat operations when she was briefly assigned to the Royal Navy. On 28th June 1942, together with HMS Duke of York, HMS Victorious and an accompanying cruiser and destroyer force, she formed part of the distant covering force to convoy PQ17, bound for Russia. In the Pacific later that same year, she became the only modern US battleship to engage an enemy capital ship, sinking the Japanese battlecruiser Kirishima.

Arctic guardian - USS Washington by Anthony Saunders (P)
Half Price! - £3000.00
 Forming part of the Eastern Task Force covering the landings at Normandy in June 1944, the cruiser HMS Mauritius is shown in company with the monitor HMS Roberts and the cruiser HMS Frobisher shelling German batteries at Merville, Houlgate and Benerville as the combined British and American forces embark upon what would become known forever as D-Day.

Operation Neptune by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £500.00
Bismarck, now complete and newly painted in full Baltic camouflage, returns to Hamburg for the last time as the harsh winter of 1940/41 relents and the pride of the German Kriegsmarine prepares for real action.  In the distance, the pre-Dreadnought Schleswig-Holstein awaits her next commission, the old ship alternating between vital ice-breaker and air defence duties at this time.  The Bismarck would in May 1941 put to sea and engage and sink HMS Hood only to be caught by the British battleships Rodney and King George V.  Bismarck was pounded into a floating wreck, finally being sunk by the torpedoes of HMS Dorsetshire.  From her crew of 2300 only 110 would be rescued by HMS Dorsetshire and HMS Maori.

Bismarck Entering Hamburg Harbour by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £15.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket