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Field of the Cloth of Gold by Sir John Gilbert.

Field of the Cloth of Gold by Sir John Gilbert.

Depicts Henry VIII on his way to the Historic meeting with Francis I of France in 1520.
Item Code : DHM0385Field of the Cloth of Gold by Sir John Gilbert. - This Edition
PRINT Open edition print.

Image size 24 inches x 16 inches (61cm x 41cm)noneHalf
Now : £25.00

All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

Other editions of this item : Field of the Cloth of Gold by Sir John Gilbert DHM0385
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£14.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :

Artist Details : Sir John Gilbert
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Sir John Gilbert

Sir John Gilbert

His father was a captain in the Royal East London Militia, but after this regiment was disbanded, became an estate-agent. John Gilbert started in this business but showed a talent for sketching, and submitted his first picture for exhibition at the age of nineteen. He was soon exhibiting at the Royal Academy and became a full academician in 1876. Five years earlier, he had been knighted. Gilbert was also a major illustrator of the nineteenth century and frequently contributed pictures to the Illustrated London News one of which depicted the Charge of the Scots Greys at Waterloo. His interest in history led to numerous paintings, particularly water-colours of historic battles. The Civil War was a common theme in his output, and several important canvases exist: Waiting for the Ring: Marston Moor (Southgate Gallery of Wolverhampton), A Regiment of Royalist Cavalry, and Naseby (Towneley Hall Art Gallery, Burnley), which was exhibited at Royal Academy in 1873. Similarly, the Crusades and the Middle Ages provided material for military pictures, e.g. The Morning of the Battle of Agincourt and Queen Margaret of Anjou taken prisoners after the Battle of Tewkesbury (both Guildhall Art Gallery), Crusaders an the March (water-colour in Victorian and Albert Museum), and The Battle of the Standard, Northallerton (water-colour in Guildhall Art Gallery; another version at Oldham Art Gallery). His canvas Edward 111 at the Siege of Calais was destroyed by enemy bombing when the Guildhall Art Gallery was hit. Reference: DNB; Spielman 1897; Oldcastle 1878

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