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Night Mission Ahead by Keith Woodcock. (Y)


Night Mission Ahead by Keith Woodcock. (Y)

Lancaster BIII OF-J PB410 of 97 sqn. lifts off from Coningsby (Tattershall Castle in the background) in 1944/45 en route for a night mission over Germany. This squadron was the second to equip with Lancasters in Jan1942 after a year with its predecessor, the Manchester. It used Lancasters until July 1946 when it converted to yet another Avro type, the Lincoln.
Item Code : DHM2411YNight Mission Ahead by Keith Woodcock. (Y) - This Edition
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EX-DISPLAY
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**Signed limited edition of 850 prints. (Three prints reduced to clear)

Exd display prints in near perfect condition.
Image size 24 inches x 16 inches (61cm x 41cm)Artist : Keith WoodcockHalf
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Other editions of this item : Night Mission Ahead by Keith Woodcock.DHM2411
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 850 prints. Image size 24 inches x 16 inches (61cm x 41cm)Artist : Keith Woodcock20 Off!Now : 80.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


The Aircraft :
NameInfo
LancasterThe Avro Lancaster arose from the avro Manchester and the first prototype Lancaster was a converted Manchester with four engines. The Lancaster was first flown in January 1941, and started operations in March 1942. By March 1945 The Royal Air Force had 56 squadrons of Lancasters with the first squadron equipped being No.44 Squadron. During World War Two the Avro Lancaster flew 156,000 sorties and dropped 618,378 tonnes of bombs between 1942 and 1945. Lancaster Bomberss took part in the devastating round-the-clock raids on Hamburg during Air Marshall Harris' "Operation Gomorrah" in July 1943. Just 35 Lancasters completed more than 100 successful operations each, and 3,249 were lost in action. The most successful survivor completed 139 operations, and the Lancaster was scrapped after the war in 1947. A few Lancasters were converted into tankers and the two tanker aircraft were joined by another converted Lancaster and were used in the Berlin Airlift, achieving 757 tanker sorties. A famous Lancaster bombing raid was the 1943 mission, codenamed Operation Chastise, to destroy the dams of the Ruhr Valley. The operation was carried out by 617 Squadron in modified Mk IIIs carrying special drum shaped bouncing bombs designed by Barnes Wallis. Also famous was a series of Lancaster attacks using Tallboy bombs against the German battleship Tirpitz, which first disabled and later sank the ship. The Lancaster bomber was the basis of the new Avro Lincoln bomber, initially known as the Lancaster IV and Lancaster V. (Becoming Lincoln B1 and B2 respectively.) Their Lancastrian airliner was also based on the Lancaster but was not very successful. Other developments were the Avro York and the successful Shackleton which continued in airborne early warning service up to 1992.
Artist Details : Keith Woodcock
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Keith Woodcock


Keith Woodcock

Keith's early work concentrated on magazine illustrations and book covers, and although he still undertakes this work from time to time, the vast majority of his current paintings are now specifically commissioned by service organisations and private clients. Keith is a former Chairman of the Guild of Aviation Artists, he also gives illustration lectures, critiques and workshops.

More about Keith Woodcock

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