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Back to English Soil by Keith Woodcock. (Y)


Back to English Soil by Keith Woodcock. (Y)

A Boeing B17G of the 91st BG USA 8th Airforce returns to English soil on three engines after a fraught daylight mission over Germany.
Item Code : DHM2402YBack to English Soil by Keith Woodcock. (Y) - This Edition
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EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Signed limited edition of 350 prints. (Two prints reduced to clear)

Ex display prints in near perfect condition.
Image size 24 inches x 11 inches (61cm x 28cm) McPartlin, James H
+ Artist : Keith Woodcock
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Other editions of this item : Back to English Soil by Keith Woodcock.DHM2402
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 350 prints. Image size 24 inches x 11 inches (61cm x 28cm) McPartlin, James H
+ Artist : Keith Woodcock
£15 Off!Now : £85.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
The signature of Brigadier General James H McPartlin

Brigadier General James H McPartlin
*Signature Value : £35

James McPartlin was born in Michigan and went to the University of Detroit and the University of Houston. James McPartlin joined the Michigan National Guard in 1935 until 1938 and In July 1941 he enlisted as an aviation cadet at Parks Air College in East Saint Louis, Illinois, going onto Air Corps flying school at Randolph Field and Foster Field in Victoria Texas. McPartlin was commissioned in February 1942 and assigned to the 20th Pursuit group and later joining at a pilot to the 91st Bomb Group. In September 1942 in England he joined the 91st Bomb Group and became operations Officer. Commanded the 401st Bomb Squadron from 25th April 1944 to 1st July 1944. AFRes Commander, 442nd Troop Carrier Wing, Richards-Gebaur Air Force Base, Missouri. He has more than 4000 hours flying time whihc inlcudes 300 hours in Jet Fighters. In February 1963 he was promoted to Brigadier General. His awards incldue the DFC and cluster Air Medal, Four Clusters and Distinguished Unit Citation and Cluster and the RAF Battle of britian Medal.
The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Flying FortressIn the mid-1930s engineers at Boeing suggested the possibility of designing a modern long-range monoplane bomber to the U.S. Army Air Corps. In 1934 the USAAC issued Circular 35-26 that outlined specifications for a new bomber that was to have a minimum payload of 2000 pounds, a cruising speed in excess of 200-MPH, and a range of at least 2000 miles. Boeing produced a prototype at its own expense, the model 299, which first flew in July of 1935. The 299 was a long-range bomber based largely on the Model 247 airliner. The Model 299 had several advanced features including an all-metal wing, an enclosed cockpit, retractable landing gear, a fully enclosed bomb bay with electrically operated doors, and cowled engines. With gun blisters glistening everywhere, a newsman covering the unveiling coined the term Flying Fortress to describe the new aircraft. After a few initial test flights the 299 flew off to Wright Field setting a speed record with an average speed of 232-mph. At Wright Field the 299 bettered its competition in almost all respects. However, an unfortunate crash of the prototype in October of 1935 resulted in the Army awarding its primary production contract to Douglas Aircraft for its DB-1 (B-18.) The Army did order 13 test models of the 299 in January 1936, and designated the new plane the Y1B-17. Early work on the B-17 was plagued by many difficulties, including the crash of the first Y1B-17 on its third flight, and nearly bankrupted the Company. Minor quantities of the B-17B, B-17C, and B-17D variants were built, and about 100 of these aircraft were in service at the time Pearl Harbor was attacked. In fact a number of unarmed B-17s flew into the War at the time of the Japanese attack. The German Blitzkrieg in Europe resulted in accelerated aircraft production in America. The B-17E was the first truly heavily armed variant and made its initial flight in September of 1941. B-17Es cost $298,000 each and more than 500 were delivered. The B-17F and B-17G were the truly mass-produced wartime versions of the Flying Fortress. More than 3,400 B-17Fs and more than 8,600 B-17Gs would be produced. The American daylight strategic bombing campaign against Germany was a major factor in the Allies winning the War in Europe. This campaign was largely flown by B-17 Flying Fortresses (12,677 built) and B-24 Liberators (18,188 built.) The B-17 bases were closer to London than those of the B-24, so B-17s received a disproportionate share of wartime publicity. The first mission in Europe with the B-17 was an Eighth Air Force flight of 12 B-17Es on August 12, 1942. Thousands more missions, with as many as 1000 aircraft on a single mission would follow over the next 2 ½ years, virtually decimating all German war making facilities and plants. The B-17 could take a lot of damage and keep on flying, and it was loved by the crews for bringing them home despite extensive battle damage. Following WW II, B-17s would see some action in Korea, and in the 1948 Israel War. There are only 14 flyable B-17s in operation today and a total of 43 complete airframes
Artist Details : Keith Woodcock
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Keith Woodcock


Keith Woodcock

Keith's early work concentrated on magazine illustrations and book covers, and although he still undertakes this work from time to time, the vast majority of his current paintings are now specifically commissioned by service organisations and private clients. Keith is a former Chairman of the Guild of Aviation Artists, he also gives illustration lectures, critiques and workshops.

More about Keith Woodcock

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