Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket


FREE worldwide shipping for orders over £150

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

AMAZING VALUE SPECIAL OFFERS !

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
 
Product Search        
Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints, many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS and all orders over £150 get FREE WORLDWIDE SHIPPING!
Many of our offers end in 5 hours, 51 minutes!
THE BIG SALE ... THE BIG SALE ... THE BIG SALE ... THE BIG SALE ... THE BIG SALE

The Globemasters by Dru Blair.


The Globemasters by Dru Blair.

The C-17 Globemaster III is the newest, and the most flexible cargo aircraft to enter the airlift force. It is capable of rapid strategic delivery of troops and all types of cargo to main operating bases or directly to forward bases in the deployment area. The aircraft is also able to perform tactical airlift and airdrop missions when required. The inherent flexibility and performance characteristics of the C-17 force improve the ability of the total airlift system to fulfill the worldwide air mobility requirements of the United States. The ultimate measure of airlift effectiveness is the ability to rapidly project and sustain an effective combat force close to a potential battle area. Threats to U.S. interests have changed in recent years, and the size and weight of U.S.-mechanized firepower and equipment have grown in response to improved capabilities of potential adversaries. This trend has significantly increased air mobility requirements, particularly in the area of large or heavy outsize cargo. As a result, newer and more flexible airlift aircraft are needed to meet potential armed contingencies, peacekeeping or humanitarian missions worldwide. The C-17 was designed and built with this new world order in mind.
Item Code : DHM6145The Globemasters by Dru Blair. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition prints.

Just one print available of this edition, with minor handling damage - small scratches and dents.
Paper size 38 inches x 15 inches (96cm x 38 cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £60.00

Quantity:
THE BIG SALE ... THE BIG SALE ... THE BIG SALE ... THE BIG SALE ... THE BIG SALE
THIS PRINT IS HALF PRICE!
For a short time, this item is being offered at half of its normal price.
We have many thousands of items like this across our website, offering great value to our customers.
Items included in the offer are changed frequently.
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Globemaster III

This Week's Half Price Art

 HM Stephen - one of the Battle of Britains top scoring fighter pilots, brings down two Me109s in quick succession over the White Cliffs of Dover, early on August 11, 1940. Flying a Spitfire with 74 Squadron, HM shot down five German aircraft on this day, and damaged a further three. The note in his log book starts First flap of the day at 0600 hrs ...  <br><br><b>Published 2000.<br><br>Sadly, all of the pilots who signed this edition have since passed away.</b>

First Flap of the Day by Nicolas Trudgian. (E)
Half Price! - £145.00
 Having spotted smoke on the horizon, Vice-Admiral Sir David Beatty ordered that a floatplane be immediately launched from HMS Engadine to investigate. Without delay, Short 184 (serial No 8359) was airborne, but had to maintain a modest altitude due to the low cloud base. Flight Lieutenant Frederick Rutland (who would forevermore be known as Rutland of Jutland) and his observer G.S. Trewin, quickly spotted the German fleet, but found their radio transmissions to be jammed and, upon encountering engine problems, were forced to return to their tender where they were able to file their report. Sadly, an increasing swell made a further flight impossible and their report failed to be relayed to the British Fleet who continued their engagement with the Germans without the benefit of aerial reconnaissance.

Flight Lieutenant Rutland and Assistant Paymaster Trewin Locate the German Fleet at Jutland, 31st May, 1916 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 An early star of Jasta 1, von Keudell is depicted here in his Halberstadt D.III, (instantly identifiable by his initial K on the fuselage side) as he drifts into position to exploit the blindspot of a Vickers Gunbus, late in the day in 1916. Von Keudells closing tally was 11 confirmed victories, but a possible 12.

Leutnant Hans von Keudell by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 The highest scoring US pilot of the Second World War, Richard Bong, is depicted in his personal P.38J <i>Marge</i>, claiming just one of his 40 confirmed victories. Insisting that he was not the greatest of marksmen, it was Bongs habit to manoeuvre to impossibly close distances before opening fire on his opponents. His eventual total may well have been greater than 40, as a further 8 probables could be attributed to him, together with 7 damaged. He was killed whilst testing a P.80 jet for the USAF in August 1945.

Richard Bong by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

 Spitfires of No.19 Squadron RAF, including Flt Sgt George Unwin (QV-H) attack a formation of He111 bombers during the Battle of Britain.

Battle of Britain by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Just as the name Zeppelin had become the common term for almost every German airship that ventured over Britain, so the name Gotha became generically used for the enemy bombers that droned across the English Channel during 1917-1918, inflicting considerable damage to coastal ports and the capital. As the massed raids of Bombengeschwader 3 increased, a public inquiry in England brought about the formation of the Royal Air Force as an independent service to counter this new threat and fighters from Europe were brought home to defend against these marauding giants. As a result, heavy losses on the German side meant that daylight raids had to be abandoned and all operations were henceforth conducted by night. Here, a pair of Gotha G.Vs begin to turn for home as searchlights play fruitlessly over distant fires, the grim result of another successful nights work.

Gothas Moon by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00
Based on a design by Henry Farman, the Bristol Boxkite first appeared in 1910 and was put into service with the RFC from its formation in 1912. It was used extensively by RNAS training schools at Eastbourne, Eastchurch and Hendon, but the type was withdrawn from service in 1915 due to obsolescence. Military versions were distinguishable from production aircraft by having extended upper wings to increase lift under load, as depicted here.

Bristol Boxkite by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Supermarine Spitfire Mk.1As of No.610 (County of Chester) Sqn RAAF, intercept incoming Heinkel 111H-16s of the 9th Staffel, Kampfgeschwader 53 Legion Condor during the big daylight raids on London of August and September 1940 - the climax of the Battle of Britain.  Spitfire N3029 (DW-K) was shot down by a Bf109 on the 5th of September 1940 and crash-landed near Gravesend, Kent, thankfully without injury to Sgt Willcocks, the pilot.  For the record, N3029 was rebuilt and, following some brief flying in the UK, was sent overseas by convoy to the Middle East.  Ironically, the ship carrying this aircraft was torpedoed en route and both ship and all its cargo were lost.

Close Encounter by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £1600.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket