Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

AMAZING VALUE SPECIAL OFFERS !

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
 
Product Search        

Old Sugar by John Young. (Y)


Old Sugar by John Young. (Y)

Avro Lancaster Mk.I R5868 of No.467 Squadron RAAF over the Lincolnshire countryside. This aircraft became the second highest scoring Lancaster with 137 operations to its credit and is today preserved at the Royal Air Force Museum.
Item Code : DHM6132YOld Sugar by John Young. (Y) - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Open edition prints. (Two prints reduced to clear)

SOLD OUT
Image size 22 inches x 14.5 inches (56cm x 37cm)noneSOLD
OUT
NOT
AVAILABLE
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Old Sugar by John Young.DHM6132
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition prints.

SOLD OUT.
Image size 22 inches x 14.5 inches (56cm x 37cm)noneSOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :


The Aircraft :
NameInfo
LancasterThe Avro Lancaster arose from the avro Manchester and the first prototype Lancaster was a converted Manchester with four engines. The Lancaster was first flown in January 1941, and started operations in March 1942. By March 1945 The Royal Air Force had 56 squadrons of Lancasters with the first squadron equipped being No.44 Squadron. During World War Two the Avro Lancaster flew 156,000 sorties and dropped 618,378 tonnes of bombs between 1942 and 1945. Lancaster Bomberss took part in the devastating round-the-clock raids on Hamburg during Air Marshall Harris' "Operation Gomorrah" in July 1943. Just 35 Lancasters completed more than 100 successful operations each, and 3,249 were lost in action. The most successful survivor completed 139 operations, and the Lancaster was scrapped after the war in 1947. A few Lancasters were converted into tankers and the two tanker aircraft were joined by another converted Lancaster and were used in the Berlin Airlift, achieving 757 tanker sorties. A famous Lancaster bombing raid was the 1943 mission, codenamed Operation Chastise, to destroy the dams of the Ruhr Valley. The operation was carried out by 617 Squadron in modified Mk IIIs carrying special drum shaped bouncing bombs designed by Barnes Wallis. Also famous was a series of Lancaster attacks using Tallboy bombs against the German battleship Tirpitz, which first disabled and later sank the ship. The Lancaster bomber was the basis of the new Avro Lincoln bomber, initially known as the Lancaster IV and Lancaster V. (Becoming Lincoln B1 and B2 respectively.) Their Lancastrian airliner was also based on the Lancaster but was not very successful. Other developments were the Avro York and the successful Shackleton which continued in airborne early warning service up to 1992.
Artist Details : John Young
Click here for a full list of all artwork by John Young


John Young

John Young was born in Bristol, England in 1930. His love affair with aviation began after a visit to Sir Alan Cobham's National Aviation Day air show in a farmer's pasture near his home in Chesham. Watching Eighth Air Force B-17s and B-24s operate out of nearby Bovingdon during WWII further fueled Young's interest in aviation and helped develop his historic interest in aviation. Young has painted professionally since 1950. In 1960, after having established a career in illustration for many aviation manufacturers, airlines, air forces, and publishers, Young went freelance to further develop his talents and move towards the world of fine art. Young's work has exhibited in the inaugural and subsequent exhibitions of the Society of Aviation Artists, now known as the Guild of Aviation Artists. Forty-five of Young's original paintings are displayed in the R.A.F. Museum in Hendon and countless others are in private and corporate collections in the U.S. and England. John Young's stature as an aviation artist is unrivalled. He was awarded the Guild Medal of Aviation Artists in 1983, and has in addition won many other prizes. From 1987, John served a term as Chairman of the Guild of Aviation Artists and he is still an active Committee member. Born in 1930, John has painted since 1950, gaining his technical knowledge during service in the Royal Air Force. His work combines a truthful representation of technical subjects with sensitivity to the many moods of sky and land. But it is in his remarkable ability to tell a story through his work that his greatest talent lies. A widely acclaimed book has been published featuring his internationally collected work, and over the years he has established himself as one of the most admired and valued aviation and transport artists in the world.

More about John Young

This Week's Half Price Art

Gerald Coulson said of this painting : <i><br>How very fortunate to be in a position to paint aviation as a result of direct experience.  This aeroplane has been featured in many of my paintings.  The fact that I have flown this machine for years and still do probably has something to do with it.  It is, of course, the de Havilland Tiger Moth, one of the greatest aeroplanes in the world.  Not one of the most comfortable, nor noted for its crisp handling qualities.  It is, nevertheless, a delight in which to be aloft over a sun-dappled landscape.  With the roar of the Gypsy engine, the slipstream singing through the bracing wires and the sun flashing off silvered wing, what more inspiration does an aviation artist require.</i>

Singing Wires by Gerald Coulson.
Half Price! - £60.00
 Britain's highest scoring Typhoon ace, Wing Commander J R Baldwin sweeps above Utah Beach on a sortie in support of the Allied forces' drive into mainland Europe following D-Day in June 1944.  He is shown flying one of his personal aircraft, Typhoon 1b MN935 'JBII'.

Wing Commander J R Baldwin by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £75.00
 Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group from Upottery, East Devon, try to hold steady amid a barrage of flak and anti aircraft fire as troops of 101st jump into the unknown above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944.  These aircraft are of the 94th Troop Carrier Squadron.

Hell Below Us by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £30.00
 Designed by the great Ernst Heinkel, the diminutive D.1 was an essential stop-gap that provided the Austro-Hungarian pilots with a front line fighter until they were able to re-equip with Albatros scouts in the Summer of 1917. This little aircraft performed well and was generally held in high regard by its pilots, although it did have some shortcomings, namely that forward vision was extremely limited and the Schwarzloses gun was completely concealed in the overwing pod that made it inaccessible in the air. Most unusual of all was its interplane strut arrangement, designed to reduce drag, which gave it the nicknames Starstrutter or Spider. These examples are shown passing above the German cruiser Derfflinger. 

Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (APB)
Half Price! - £60.00

 The success of the attack on the Möhne dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943 meant that the remaining three 617 Sqn Lancasters of the First Wave could turn their attention to the Eder, some twelve minutes flying time away.  Wing Commander Guy Gibson first called in Flight Lieutenant D J Shannon, flying AJ-L (ED929G) to make the initial run, but he had great difficulty achieving the correct height and approach, so Gibson now ordered Squadron Leader H E Maudslay in AJ-Z (ED937G) to make his run.  Again, the aircraft struggled to find the correct height and direction, so Shannon was again brought in, AJ-L finally releasing its <i>Upkeep</i> on the third attempt. The bomb bounced twice before exploding with no visible effect on the dam. Now Maudslay made another attempt, but released his bomb too late.  The mine bounced off of the dam wall and exploded in mid air right behind AJ-Z, the Lancaster limping away, damaged, from the scene, only to be shot down on the way home with the loss of all crew.  Finally, Pilot Officer Les Knight was called in for one final attempt. AJ-N (ED912G) released its <i>Upkeep</i>  perfectly, the mine bouncing three times before striking the dam slightly to the south.  In the ensuing explosion, the dam was seen to shake visibly before the masonry began to crumble and a massive breach appeared.  With the Möhne and Eder dams both destroyed and the Sorpe demonstrated to be equally vulnerable, <i>Operation Chastise</i> had been a remarkable success and will stand forever as one of the most heroic and audacious attacks in the history of aerial warfare.

The Eder Breaks by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00
 Concorde G-BOAC climbing steadily towards its operational height of nearly 60,000 feet and cruising speed of Mach 2.

The Queen of the Skies by Adrian Rigby. (Y)
Half Price! - £20.00
 On the night of 12th/13th November 1940, Whitley V P5005 found itself slightly off course above the primary target due to problems with the intercom. Changing instead to a secondary target, some railway marshalling yards near Cologne, Pilot Officer Leonard Cheshire suddenly felt his aircraft rocked by a series of violent explosions that caused a severe fire to break out in the fuselage, filling the cockpit with acrid black smoke. As DY-N plunged some 2,000 feet, Cheshire managed to regain control and the fire was eventually extinguished. For bringing his aircraft safely home to 102 Squadron's base after being airborne for eight and half hours, Cheshire was awarded a DSO.

A DSO for Cheshire by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £550.00
 Erich Lowenhardt was already the holder of the Knights Cross 1st and 2nd Class for acts of bravery even before becoming a pilot. After serving as an observer for a year, he was eventually posted to Jasta 10 in 1917 where he immediately began to score victories, sending down balloons and enemy aircraft at a fearsome rate. He was appointed Commander of Jasta 10 one week before his 21st birthday, making him one the youngest pilots to rise to such a rank in the German Army Air Service. He continued to increase his score steadily throughout 1917 and 1918, but was involved in a mid-air collision with a Jasta 11 aircraft on 10th August. Lowenhardt elected to abandon his aircraft, but his parachute failed to deploy and the young ace fell to his death. He flew a number of aircraft, but this yellow-fuselaged Fokker D.VII was his most distinctive and is believed to be the aircraft in which he was killed. His final victory total was 54.

Oberleutnant Erich Lowenhardt by Ivan Berryman. (APB)
Half Price! - £60.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket