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Old Sugar by John Young. (Y)


Old Sugar by John Young. (Y)

Avro Lancaster Mk.I R5868 of No.467 Squadron RAAF over the Lincolnshire countryside. This aircraft became the second highest scoring Lancaster with 137 operations to its credit and is today preserved at the Royal Air Force Museum.
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Item Code : DHM6132YOld Sugar by John Young. (Y) - This Edition
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Other editions of this item : Old Sugar by John Young.DHM6132
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Extra Details : Old Sugar by John Young. (Y)
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The Aircraft :
NameInfo
LancasterThe Avro Lancaster arose from the avro Manchester and the first prototype Lancaster was a converted Manchester with four engines. The Lancaster was first flown in January 1941, and started operations in March 1942. By March 1945 The Royal Air Force had 56 squadrons of Lancasters with the first squadron equipped being No.44 Squadron. During World War Two the Avro Lancaster flew 156,000 sorties and dropped 618,378 tonnes of bombs between 1942 and 1945. Lancaster Bomberss took part in the devastating round-the-clock raids on Hamburg during Air Marshall Harris' "Operation Gomorrah" in July 1943. Just 35 Lancasters completed more than 100 successful operations each, and 3,249 were lost in action. The most successful survivor completed 139 operations, and the Lancaster was scrapped after the war in 1947. A few Lancasters were converted into tankers and the two tanker aircraft were joined by another converted Lancaster and were used in the Berlin Airlift, achieving 757 tanker sorties. A famous Lancaster bombing raid was the 1943 mission, codenamed Operation Chastise, to destroy the dams of the Ruhr Valley. The operation was carried out by 617 Squadron in modified Mk IIIs carrying special drum shaped bouncing bombs designed by Barnes Wallis. Also famous was a series of Lancaster attacks using Tallboy bombs against the German battleship Tirpitz, which first disabled and later sank the ship. The Lancaster bomber was the basis of the new Avro Lincoln bomber, initially known as the Lancaster IV and Lancaster V. (Becoming Lincoln B1 and B2 respectively.) Their Lancastrian airliner was also based on the Lancaster but was not very successful. Other developments were the Avro York and the successful Shackleton which continued in airborne early warning service up to 1992.
Artist Details : John Young
Click here for a full list of all artwork by John Young


John Young

John Young was born in Bristol, England in 1930. His love affair with aviation began after a visit to Sir Alan Cobham's National Aviation Day air show in a farmer's pasture near his home in Chesham. Watching Eighth Air Force B-17s and B-24s operate out of nearby Bovingdon during WWII further fueled Young's interest in aviation and helped develop his historic interest in aviation. Young has painted professionally since 1950. In 1960, after having established a career in illustration for many aviation manufacturers, airlines, air forces, and publishers, Young went freelance to further develop his talents and move towards the world of fine art. Young's work has exhibited in the inaugural and subsequent exhibitions of the Society of Aviation Artists, now known as the Guild of Aviation Artists. Forty-five of Young's original paintings are displayed in the R.A.F. Museum in Hendon and countless others are in private and corporate collections in the U.S. and England. John Young's stature as an aviation artist is unrivalled. He was awarded the Guild Medal of Aviation Artists in 1983, and has in addition won many other prizes. From 1987, John served a term as Chairman of the Guild of Aviation Artists and he is still an active Committee member. Born in 1930, John has painted since 1950, gaining his technical knowledge during service in the Royal Air Force. His work combines a truthful representation of technical subjects with sensitivity to the many moods of sky and land. But it is in his remarkable ability to tell a story through his work that his greatest talent lies. A widely acclaimed book has been published featuring his internationally collected work, and over the years he has established himself as one of the most admired and valued aviation and transport artists in the world.

More about John Young

This Week's Half Price Art

 Opened in 1932, Ryde airport became the principal airport for the Isle of Wight, with routes being operated to destinations as far away as Croydon, Bristol and Shoreham, as well as a regular commuter service that took in Southampton, Bournemouth and Portsmouth.  This painting depicts a typical day early in 1936 when aircraft of both Portsmouth, Southsea and Isle of Wight Aviation Ltd  and Railway Air Services were using the airport, in this case, Airspeed Courier G-ADAY and De Havilland Dragon Rapide G-ACPR City of Birmingham respectively.  The airport closed officially in 1939, but may have been used sporadically after the war.  The site of the airport is now occupied by Tesco and McDonalds.

Ryde Airport, 1936 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 When the RAF took delivery of their first Consolidated B.24 Liberators in 1941, aerial cover for trans-Atlantic convoys was strengthened, affording these brave merchant ships a modicum of protection as they forged their slow passage from the US to Britain with vital supplies. 120 Sqn was immediately pressed into this role from their initial base at Nutts Corner in Northern Ireland, before moving to Ballykelly and Reykjavik in Iceland as the U-Boat threat increased. The example shown is a Liberator V of RAF Coastal Command.

The Long Patrol by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £550.00
 Tucked in tight en route to Copenhagen, a wave of Mosquito FB VIs of 21 Sqn and their Mustang Mk.III escorts of 126 Sqn (including top Ace Agorastos John Plagis - 16 victories, on his last mission of the war)  approach the Jutland Peninsula after a bumpy crossing of the North Sea on the morning of 21st March 1945.  The Mosquitoes went on to carry out one of the most daring and successful raids of the Second World War on the German Gestapo headquarters in the centre of Copenhagen, inflicting irreparable damage to the Shellhus and killing more than 150 Gestapo personnel.

Shell House Raiders by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 The extraordinary Taube (or Dove) was extensively used by the Germans as a reliable, stable observation and reconnaissance aircraft as late as 1916, despite its archaic appearance. The Taube type first flew in Austria in 1909, the brainchild of Dr Igo Etrich and employed the early method of directional control known as differential wing-warping, instead of possessing ailerons and elevators. This version was powered by a Mercedes 6-cylinder inline engine and is a two-seat variant, much favoured by the Germans.

Etrich Taube by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
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 Routine, though essential, maintenance is carried out on a 501 Sqn Hurricane at the height of the Battle of Britain during the Summer of 1940.  Hurricane P3059 <i>SD-N</i> in the background is the aircraft of Group Captain Byron Duckenfield.

Ground Force by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £70.00
 German ace Lt. Fritz Roth of Jasta 23, flying an Albatross D.Va scores his first of three balloons in one days action. By the wars end he had accounted for 20 balloons and 8 Allied Aircraft.

Balloon Buster, 25th January 1918 by David Pentland. (GS)
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 Two Spitfire Mk1Bs of 92 Squadron patrol the south coast from their temporary base at Ford, here passing over the Needles rocks, Isle of Wight, in the Spring of 1942.

In Them We Trust by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 Two Republic P.47s of the 78th FG roar low over the Normandy beaches as the Allied invasion gets underway during Operation Overlord on 6th June 1944 as an LCT(5) Tank Landing Craft makes its break for the beach through a hail of enemy fire.  These craft were used at all the D-Day beaches, carrying mixed loads of vehicles and stores in almost impossible conditions.

The Dash for the Beach by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £1100.00
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