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Old Sugar by John Young. (Y)


Old Sugar by John Young. (Y)

Avro Lancaster Mk.I R5868 of No.467 Squadron RAAF over the Lincolnshire countryside. This aircraft became the second highest scoring Lancaster with 137 operations to its credit and is today preserved at the Royal Air Force Museum.
Item Code : DHM6132YOld Sugar by John Young. (Y) - This Edition
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Other editions of this item : Old Sugar by John Young.DHM6132
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The Aircraft :
NameInfo
LancasterThe Avro Lancaster arose from the avro Manchester and the first prototype Lancaster was a converted Manchester with four engines. The Lancaster was first flown in January 1941, and started operations in March 1942. By March 1945 The Royal Air Force had 56 squadrons of Lancasters with the first squadron equipped being No.44 Squadron. During World War Two the Avro Lancaster flew 156,000 sorties and dropped 618,378 tonnes of bombs between 1942 and 1945. Lancaster Bomberss took part in the devastating round-the-clock raids on Hamburg during Air Marshall Harris' "Operation Gomorrah" in July 1943. Just 35 Lancasters completed more than 100 successful operations each, and 3,249 were lost in action. The most successful survivor completed 139 operations, and the Lancaster was scrapped after the war in 1947. A few Lancasters were converted into tankers and the two tanker aircraft were joined by another converted Lancaster and were used in the Berlin Airlift, achieving 757 tanker sorties. A famous Lancaster bombing raid was the 1943 mission, codenamed Operation Chastise, to destroy the dams of the Ruhr Valley. The operation was carried out by 617 Squadron in modified Mk IIIs carrying special drum shaped bouncing bombs designed by Barnes Wallis. Also famous was a series of Lancaster attacks using Tallboy bombs against the German battleship Tirpitz, which first disabled and later sank the ship. The Lancaster bomber was the basis of the new Avro Lincoln bomber, initially known as the Lancaster IV and Lancaster V. (Becoming Lincoln B1 and B2 respectively.) Their Lancastrian airliner was also based on the Lancaster but was not very successful. Other developments were the Avro York and the successful Shackleton which continued in airborne early warning service up to 1992.
Artist Details : John Young
Click here for a full list of all artwork by John Young


John Young

John Young was born in Bristol, England in 1930. His love affair with aviation began after a visit to Sir Alan Cobham's National Aviation Day air show in a farmer's pasture near his home in Chesham. Watching Eighth Air Force B-17s and B-24s operate out of nearby Bovingdon during WWII further fueled Young's interest in aviation and helped develop his historic interest in aviation. Young has painted professionally since 1950. In 1960, after having established a career in illustration for many aviation manufacturers, airlines, air forces, and publishers, Young went freelance to further develop his talents and move towards the world of fine art. Young's work has exhibited in the inaugural and subsequent exhibitions of the Society of Aviation Artists, now known as the Guild of Aviation Artists. Forty-five of Young's original paintings are displayed in the R.A.F. Museum in Hendon and countless others are in private and corporate collections in the U.S. and England. John Young's stature as an aviation artist is unrivalled. He was awarded the Guild Medal of Aviation Artists in 1983, and has in addition won many other prizes. From 1987, John served a term as Chairman of the Guild of Aviation Artists and he is still an active Committee member. Born in 1930, John has painted since 1950, gaining his technical knowledge during service in the Royal Air Force. His work combines a truthful representation of technical subjects with sensitivity to the many moods of sky and land. But it is in his remarkable ability to tell a story through his work that his greatest talent lies. A widely acclaimed book has been published featuring his internationally collected work, and over the years he has established himself as one of the most admired and valued aviation and transport artists in the world.

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 Erich Lowenhardt was already the holder of the Knights Cross 1st and 2nd Class for acts of bravery even before becoming a pilot. After serving as an observer for a year, he was eventually posted to Jasta 10 in 1917 where he immediately began to score victories, sending down balloons and enemy aircraft at a fearsome rate. He was appointed Commander of Jasta 10 one week before his 21st birthday, making him one the youngest pilots to rise to such a rank in the German Army Air Service. He continued to increase his score steadily throughout 1917 and 1918, but was involved in a mid-air collision with a Jasta 11 aircraft on 10th August. Lowenhardt elected to abandon his aircraft, but his parachute failed to deploy and the young ace fell to his death. He flew a number of aircraft, but this yellow-fuselaged Fokker D.VII was his most distinctive and is believed to be the aircraft in which he was killed. His final victory total was 54.

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