Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

Product Search        

Etcetera by Warwick Higgs.


Etcetera by Warwick Higgs.

Item Code : FAR0652Etcetera by Warwick Higgs. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print.

Image size 23 inches x 10 inches (58cm x 25cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £15.00

Quantity:
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


Artist Details : Warwick Higgs
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Warwick Higgs


Warwick Higgs

Warwick Higgs was born in London, and at the age of 21 Warwick left college to become a full-time painter. Being a keen naturalist, animals and birds provided the main inspiration for his paintings. Warwick Higgs had his first one-man exhibition was in London in 1976. Warwick lives and works in Surrey. He has completed numerous commissions for the advertising industry, charities, corporations and publishers and his work is included in collections in Europe, Japan and USA. In 1996 and 1999 Warwick was nominated as a finalist in The Fine Art Trade Guild Awards and in 1997 he won the Best Up and Coming Artist Award. For many years he produced a superb series of paintings for art prints for Solomon and Whitehead.

More about Warwick Higgs

This Week's Half Price Art

The first fight for independence of the American Revolution. The Battle of Lexington, known as Lexington Common, is where the opening shots of the American Revolution of 1775 took place. The Common had been purchased by subscription of some of the towns leading citizens in 1711.  The engagement took place oon April 19th 1775.  Lt Col Francis Smith wiith 700 men under his command was given secret orders to capture and destroy military supplies that were reportedly stored by the Massachusetts militia at Concord. But Patriot colonials had received word weeks before the expedition that their supplies might be at risk, and had moved the supplies to other stores.  They were also given word that the British were on their way and a rapid deployment of the militia was undertaken. The first shots were fired just as the sun was rising at Lexington. The Minutemen were outnumbered and withdrew, as the British proceeded on to Concord. At the North Bridge in Concord they were meet by a force of several hundred militiamen who defeated the British three companies of the Kings troops, who withdrew  More Minutemen arrived soon thereafter and inflicted heavy damage on the regulars as they marched back towards Boston. Upon returning to Lexington, Smiths expedition was rescued by reinforcements.  The whole British force of some 1700 men withdrew back to Boston.

Battle of Lexington by William Barnes Wollen. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
 So Tell The Spartans, Stranger passing by that here, Obedient to their laws, we lie.   In 480 BC the Spartans tried to defend the pass at Thermopylae against the Persians led by Xerxes.  The Persian fleet had sailed along the coastline from northern Greece into the Gulf of Malia on the eastern Aegean Sea towards the mountains at Thermopylae. The Greek General and King Leonidas led the Greeks  and tried to defend the pass of Thermopylae.  All the defending Spartans were killed during the Battle of Thermopylae. Their defence and courage provided inspiration to the Greeks, and the following year the Greeks won battles against their old enemy the Persians.

Thermopylae 480BC, Spartan and Thespaian Hoplites. By Chris Collingwood. (GM)
Half Price! - £330.00
MARK5. Original Oil Study of Officer Skinners Horse painting by Mark Churms.
Original Oil Study of Officer Skinners Horse painting by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £300.00
 It is August 1944, barely two months since the Allies landed their first troops on the beaches of Normandy. After the failed Operation Lüttich (codename given to a German counterattack during the Battle of Normandy, which took place around the American positions near Mortain from 7 August to 13 August, 1944 ) The German Panzer Divisions were in full retreat, The British and American Generals believed it to be critical to halt them before they cauld regroup. Caught in the Gap at Falaise, the battle was to be decisive. Flying throughout a continuous onslaught, rocket-firing Typhoons kept up their attacks on the trapped armoured divisions from dawn to dusk. The effect was devastating: at the end of the ten day battle the 100,000 strong German force was decimated. The battle of the Falaise Pocket marked the closing phase of the Battle of Normandy with a decisive German defeat. It is believed that between 80,000 to 100,000 German troops were caught in the encirclement of which 10,000 to 15,000 were killed, 45,000 to 50,000 taken prisoner, and around 20,000 escaped . Shown here are German Tiger I tanks under continues attack by Royal Aoir Force Typhoons.

Taming the Tiger by Geoff Lea. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00

King Harold defeats the Viking invaders at Stamford Bridge before his long march south to face William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings.

Battle of Stamford Bridge by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - £50.00
DHM212.  The 55th Regiment at the Battle of Inkerman by Orlando Norie.
The 55th Regiment at the Battle of Inkerman by Orlando Norie.
Half Price! - £20.00
 With Fixed Bayonets soldiers of 2nd battalion Scots Guards clear enemy positions of 5th Argentine Marine Battalion on the slopes of Tumbledown.

Battle for Tumbledown by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - £35.00
Battle of Louisburg during the French and Indian Wars,  A British Force set out to capture the French Fortress of Louisburg at Cape Breton island. A Army of New Englanders under the command of Col. William Pepperell supported by an English Fleet under Commander  Peter Warren.  Attacked the Fortress of Louisburg on April 30th 1745 and finally captured the fortress on June 17th.  A great British Victory which endangered  the French position in North America.   The fortifications were handed back to France in 1748 in the treaty of Aix-La-Chapelle.

Siege of Louisburg, Canada, July 1745 by David Rowlands (B)
Half Price! - £20.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket