Customer Helpline
(UK) : 01436 820269

Shipping Rates
Valuation of Your Collection

You currently have no items in your basket

Last Christmas Post Dates (more)
UK : 22 Dec, US/CAN/EUR : 18 Dec

Join us on Facebook!

Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!


Product Search        

Etcetera by Warwick Higgs.

Etcetera by Warwick Higgs.

Item Code : FAR0652Etcetera by Warwick Higgs. - This Edition
PRINTOpen edition print.

Image size 23 inches x 10 inches (58cm x 25cm)noneHalf
Now : £15.00

For our Christmas sale, this item is being offered at half of its normal price.
We have many thousands of items like this across our website, offering great value to our customers.
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

Artist Details : Warwick Higgs
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Warwick Higgs

Warwick Higgs

Warwick Higgs was born in London, and at the age of 21 Warwick left college to become a full-time painter. Being a keen naturalist, animals and birds provided the main inspiration for his paintings. Warwick Higgs had his first one-man exhibition was in London in 1976. Warwick lives and works in Surrey. He has completed numerous commissions for the advertising industry, charities, corporations and publishers and his work is included in collections in Europe, Japan and USA. In 1996 and 1999 Warwick was nominated as a finalist in The Fine Art Trade Guild Awards and in 1997 he won the Best Up and Coming Artist Award. For many years he produced a superb series of paintings for art prints for Solomon and Whitehead.

More about Warwick Higgs

This Week's Half Price Art

Napoleon is shown taking leave of the Imperial Guard outside the Palace of Fontainbleau. With a dramatic final gesture, I cannot embrace you all but I shall embrace your General, and after General Petit, he kissed the eagle of the 1st Grenadiers whose bearer, Lieut Fortin covers his face. The officers at the right are representative of the Allied armies and are considerably less affected by the scene than the Frenchman.

Les Adieux de Fontainebleau by Horace Vernet.
Half Price! - £40.00
The painting depicts the 92nd Highlanders (Gordon Highlanders) routing Ayub Khan tribesmen, on 31st August 1880, who had earlier on 26th July beaten the British at the battle of Maiwand and was now besieging the remainder of Primroses division in the citadel of Kandahar. Roberts with a force of 10,000 men (Gordon Highlanders, 60th Rifles, 72nd Highlanders, Sixth Gurka and Punjabi Infantry) marched out of Kabul to relieve Kandahar which was 300 miles away. The epic Battle of Kandahar made Roberts one of the great Victorian military heroes.
92nd Highlanders at the Battle of Kandahar by Richard Caton Woodville (B)
Half Price! - £35.00
The Romans have abducted the daughters of their neighbors, the Sabines.  To avenge this abduction, the Sabines attacked Rome, although not immediately, since Hersilia, the daughter of Tatius, the leader of the Sabines, had been married to Romulus, the Roman leader, and then had two children by him in the interim.  Here we see Hersilia between her father and husband as she adjures the warriors on both sides not to take wives away from their husbands or mothers away from their children.  The other Sabine Women join in her exhortations.

The Sabine Women by Jacques Louis David. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00
 A once noble household becomes the focus of the common mans greed, thwarted only by the timely arrival of a troop of Kings Horse.

For Sack and Plunder by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £75.00

Cavalry and Legionaries (plus Auxiliary Hamian Archer) of the XIVth Legion.

AD61 by Chris Collingwood (GL)
Half Price! - £360.00
Battle of Fontenoy during the war of Austrian Succession. French victory under Marshal Maurice De Saxe over the allies (British, Dutch and German under the Duke of Cumberland) 11th May 1745. Fontenoy, 5 miles south east of Tournai (Tolnay) the battle which started with a Dutch assault and British and Hanovarian infantry advance against the French centre during the battle a sudden attack by an Irish Brigade under French command, attacked the allied forces. The allied square was broken but the British, Hanovarian and Dutch forces retreated in good order.
Battle of Fontenoy by Horace Vernet. (Y)
Half Price! - £210.00
King Harold defeats the Viking invaders at Stamford Bridge before his long march south to face William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings.

Battle of Stamford Bridge by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - £50.00
The Duke of Cumberland, their colonel, commanding the allied forces; measured his strength with Marshal Saxe, who was then besieging Tournay.  The First Guards were on the right of the centre, in the first line, when the Duke, furious at the failure on both wings, ordered the masses of troops to attack.  The infantry dashed forward between the village and the redoubt, and as the British Guards advanced over a low ridge, and saw the French Guards before them, a scene occurred which has become legendary in military history. 'Messieurs les Anglais, tirez les premiers!' is a phrase that bespeaks the old fashioned chivalry with which foemen worthy of each other's steel loved to treat one another.  The story of what occurred is variously given.  'The officers of the English Guards,' says Voltaire, 'when in the presence of the enemy, saluted the French by taking off their hats.  The Comte de Chabannes, and the Duc de Biron, who were in advance returned the salute, as did all the officers of the French Guards.  Lord Charles Hay of the King's Company, 1st Guards, stepped forward and took off his hat.  Lord Charles Hay then pulled out a flask and drank a toast to the French, saying: 'Gentlemen of the French Guard, I hope you will wait for us today and not escape by swimming the Scheldt as you swam the Main at Dettingen.'  Then he turned to his Company and said: 'Men of the King's Company, these are the French Guards and I hope you are going to beat them today.'  Count D'Anteroche, lieutenant of grenadiers, replied in a loud voice:  'Gentlemen, we never fire first; we will follow you.'  The French troops opened fire first but most of their shots went high.  Then the British troops opened fire and nineteen officers and up to 600 men of the French Guards are said to have fallen at the first discharge, as the English pushed on, the enemy were borne back, and in the face of a terrific fire, the Guards drove them into their camp. Here, exposed to the tremendous reverse fire of the redoubt of Eu, the Guards according to Rousseau, formed themselves into a kind of square, and resisted repeated attacks of the cavalry of the French Guards and Carabineers.  But unsupported and decimated by the withering hail of iron that assailed them, attacked by fresh troops and the Irish brigades of Clare and Dillon, beset as in a fiery furnace, the Guards at length began to retire.  They did so in perfect order; but the First Guards left 4 officers, 3 sergeants and 82 men dead on the field, besides having 149 wounded in all.  It was a defeat due to bad generalship and want of cohesion among allies, but its sanguinary episodes added new lustre to the great fame of the Guards. 'There are things, 'says Marshal Saxe, - or some say his friend General D'Heronville, in his Trait des Legions - 'which all of us have seen, but of which our pride makes us silent because we well know we cannot imitate them.'  Fontenoy was a defeat for the British army.  During the battle Lord Charles Hay was wounded but would later be in action again.

The Battle of Fontenoy by Felix Philippoteaux.
Half Price! - £33.00
          Home / View All Products                       View Your Basket