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Death of Socrates by Jacques Louis David. (Y)


Death of Socrates by Jacques Louis David. (Y)

This picture depicts the closing moments of the life of Socrates. Condemned to death or exile by the Athenian government for his teaching methods which aroused scepticism and impiety in his students, Socrates heroicly rejected exile and accepted death from hemlock. Here the philosopher continues to speak even while reaching for the cup, demonstrating his indifference to death and his unyielding commitment to his ideals. Jacques Louis David painted this historical picture in 1787. Commissioned by the Trudaine de Montigny brothers, leaders in the call for a free market system and more public discussion.
Item Code : GE3994CYDeath of Socrates by Jacques Louis David. (Y) - This Edition
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**Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. (One reduced to clear)

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Image size 40 inches x 30 inches (102cm x 76cm)noneHalf
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Other editions of this item : Death of Socrates by Jacques Louis David GE3994
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GICLEE
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Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£520.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 40 inches x 30 inches (102cm x 76cm)noneHalf Price!Now : £300.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
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Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 22 inches (76cm x 56cm)noneHalf Price!Now : £200.00VIEW EDITION...
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Artist Details : Jacques Louis David
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Jacques Louis David


Jacques Louis David

Jacques-Louis David. French historical painter born in Paris on 30th August 1748. David was a highly influential French painter in the Neoclassical style, considered to be the preeminent painter of the era.

Jacques-Louis David was a supporter of the French Revolution and a friend of Maximilien Robespierre and one of the leading figures of Neoclassicism. He was a distant relative of Boucher, who perhaps helped his early artistic progress as a pupil under Vien (1765). He won the Prix de Rome in 1774 and travelled with his master to Rome where he spent six years. It was during this period (1775-81), that he abandoned the grand manner of his early work, with its Baroque use of lighting and composition for a stark, highly finished and morally didactic style. In 1784 the change of style was confirmed by the Oath of the Horatii which hangs in the Louvre in Paris. During the French Revolution, David played an active role both artistically - he reorganized the Acadme and produced numerous and spectacular propaganda exercises - and politically, as an avid supporter of Robespierre, who voted for the execution of the king. He also attempted to catalogue the new heroes of the age, abortively in the Oath of the Tennis Court, and successfully in his pieta-like portrayal of the Death of Marat (1793, Brussels, Muse Royaux). He aligned himself with yet another political regime upon his release, that of Napoleon I. It was at this time that he developed his 'Empire style'. In 1799 Napoleon gained power, and David gained a new hero. He recorded the general and later the Emperor in numerous propaganda pieces, especially Napoleon at St Bernards Pass , 1800, Versailles, and the Crowning of Josephine. In professional terms, he failed to survive the fall of Napoleon, and retired to Brussels in 1815 where he died on 25th December 1825.

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