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Neil Lennon by Gary Brandham.


Neil Lennon by Gary Brandham.

Item Code : SPC5008Neil Lennon by Gary Brandham. - This Edition
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 500 prints. Paper size 27 inches x 19 inches (70cm x 49cm) Lennon, Neil
+ Artist : Gary Brandham
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Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
Neil Lennon
*Signature Value : 25

Former Celtic football player and now manager.

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