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Puddles by David Dipnall.


Puddles by David Dipnall.

Item Code : LE0124Puddles by David Dipnall. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 850 prints.

Last few copies of this edition available, published in 1986 and sold out at the publisher.
Image size†16 inches x†10.5 inches (41cm x 27cm)Artist : David DipnallHalf
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Artist Details : David Dipnall
Click here for a full list of all artwork by David Dipnall


David Dipnall

David Dipnals evocative images of the restful idyllic scenes of southern England are well known, epitomising, as they have for years, all that is endearing about traditional English landscapes. His well known images of his beautiful and fertile homeland are a world away from Australia, where he now spends most of his time. In the last decade, David Dipnall estimates that he has travelled nearly 2 million miles, continuing to maintain a busy work schedule of exhibitions and regularly commuting between England and Australia. His originals are highly sought after, and over fifty of his images have been published as limited edition prints, many of which have sold out. Always a traveller, he believes in the philosophy that absence makes the heart grow fonder, and his beautifully detailed traditional English landscapes are definitely painted from the heart.

More about David Dipnall

This Week's Half Price Art

In the reletive comfort of a stable, two Polish Lancers rest and tend one of their horses.

Lancers in a Stable by Horace Vernet.
Half Price! - £20.00
 Although a very brown picture, it shows the Lancashire Regiment, coming of the beaches during the Gallipoli Campaign.

Gallipoli by Charles Dixon.
Half Price! - £25.00
The first fight for independence of the American Revolution. The Battle of Lexington, known as Lexington Common, is where the opening shots of the American Revolution of 1775 took place. The Common had been purchased by subscription of some of the towns leading citizens in 1711.  The engagement took place oon April 19th 1775.  Lt Col Francis Smith wiith 700 men under his command was given secret orders to capture and destroy military supplies that were reportedly stored by the Massachusetts militia at Concord. But Patriot colonials had received word weeks before the expedition that their supplies might be at risk, and had moved the supplies to other stores.  They were also given word that the British were on their way and a rapid deployment of the militia was undertaken. The first shots were fired just as the sun was rising at Lexington. The Minutemen were outnumbered and withdrew, as the British proceeded on to Concord. At the North Bridge in Concord they were meet by a force of several hundred militiamen who defeated the British three companies of the Kings troops, who withdrew  More Minutemen arrived soon thereafter and inflicted heavy damage on the regulars as they marched back towards Boston. Upon returning to Lexington, Smiths expedition was rescued by reinforcements.  The whole British force of some 1700 men withdrew back to Boston.

Battle of Lexington by William Barnes Wollen. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
 Depicting one of the nighttime Zulu attacks on Rorkes Drift. The South Wales Borderers defend the outpost by the light of the burning hospital building.

Night of the Zulu by Bud Bradshaw. (Y)
Half Price! - £100.00

 Hannibal had invaded Italy by taking his army including war elephants across the mountains and into northern Italy. He defeated the Romans in three major battles including Cannae, but he did not take Rome when he had the chance.  Once Rome had strengthened its forces, the Romans invaded Carthage. The second Punic War between Rome and Carthage was brought to a conclusion on the plains of Zama (modern Tunisia) with the Romans inflicting a crushing defeat on the army of Hannibal.

Battle of Zama by Brian Palmer. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Captain F Macbeans Company, 1st Battalion Royal Artillery in action on the right of the British line, firing its 12 pounder guns against French Cavalry and Infantry. By permission of David Rowlands.  Battle of Minden  1st August 1759.  Major battle of the Seven years war.  After the French victory in April at Bergen, The French Army 60,000 strong under the command of Duc Louis de Contades marched northwards towards Hanover.   To block this French Advance the Prussian Army under Field Marshall The Duke of Brunswick decided to hold the line at Minden.  The Duke of Brunswick could only raise a force of 45,000 men including a British Contingent under Lord George Sackville of 6 regiments, a detachment of cavalry and some artillery.   The French opened the battle attacking,  the British Infantry regiments probably due to a misunderstanding, advanced and they were followed by the Hanoverian Infantry.  They attacked the French cavalry.  The Infantry advanced only stopping to let off a volleys of fire.  This unconventional use of Infantry against cavalry, the French force confused and suffering losses broke.  The victory was in Ferdinands grasp, he ordered his cavalry forward but the British general Sackville refused to send his cavalry after the French. For this action he was later court-martialled by King George II and cashiered from the army.  The French were able to withdraw in order, but their losses had been 7,000 men and 43 artillery guns.   The British and Hanoverian losses were less than 3,000 with 1500 of these casualties inflicted on the British Infantry.  This battle ended all French hopes of capturing Hanover.  British Regiments at Minden. 12th of Foot. (Suffolk Regiment)  20th Foot. (Lancashire Fusiliers ) 23rd of Foot. (Welch Fusiliers),  25th of Foot, (Kings own Scottish Borderers), 37th of Foot. (Royal Hampshire Regiment),  51st Foot   (Kings own Yorkshire Light Infantry)

The Battle of Minden, 1st August 1759 by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Last stand of the 24th South Wales Borderers at Isandhlwana during the Zulu War. The battle of Isandhlwana, a Zulu victory over the British forces on 22nd January 1879 about 100km north of Durban. Lord Chelmsford led a column of forces to seek out the Zulu army camped at Isandhlwana, while patrols searched the district. After receiving a report, Chelmsford set forth at half strength, leaving six companies of the 24th Regiment, two guns, some Colonial Volunteers and a native contingent (in all about 1,800 troops) at the camp. Later that morning an advanced post warned of an approaching Zulu army. Shortly after this, thousands of Zulus were found hidden in a ravine by a mounted patrol but as the patrol set off to warn the camp, the Zulus followed. At the orders of the Camp Commander, troops spread out around the perimeter of the camp, but the Zulu army broke through their defences. The native contingent who fled during the attack were hunted down and killed. The remaining troops of the 24th Regiment, 534 soldiers and 21 officers, were killed where they fought. The Zulus left no one alive, taking no prisoners and leaving no wounded or missing. About 300 Africans and 50 Europeans escaped the attack. Consequently, the invasion of Zulu country was delayed while reinforcements arrived from Britain.

Battle of Isandhlwana, 22nd January 1879 by Brian Palmer. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 US Marines of the 2nd Battalion, 2nd RCT, 2nd Marine Division, supported by LVTs and tanks, take part in the successful but bloody assault on Betio Island, part of the Tarawa Atoll. Operation Galvanic as it was known became the first step on the island road to Japan itself.

Red Beach Two, Tarawa Atoll, 20th November 1943 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
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