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DHM2185. Farewell the Hood by Simon Atack. <p> HMS Hood, Britains largest warship and pride of the Royal Navy, steams majestically through the Swept Channel on 22 May, 1941. Having fuelled at the Scapa Flow naval base in Scotland, she steers clear of floats suspending torpedo and submarine nets, as she heads for open water and the North Sea. The crew of a naval cutter wave farewell as the mighty battleship departs upon what will prove to be her final voyage. <p><b>Less than 50 copies now available.<b><p> Signed by <a href=profiles.php?SigID=493>Lieutenant Ted Briggs RN</a> (deceased) <p> Signed limited edition of 500 prints.  <p>Image size 16 inches x 25 inches (41cm x 64cm)
DHM1620. The Final Salvo - HMS Hood by Anthony Saunders. <p> HMS Hood readies to fire off a what proved to be the final salvo against the Bismarck before a shell from the German battleship penetrated the magazine of HMS Hood, tearing apart the British ship in an enormous explosion. <b><p> Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. <p> Image size 19 inches x 12 inches (48cm x 31cm)

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  Website Price: £ 170.00  

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HMS Hood Prints by Anthony Saunders and Simon Atack.

PCK1573. HMS Hood Prints by Anthony Saunders and Simon Atack.

Naval Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM2185. Farewell the Hood by Simon Atack.

HMS Hood, Britains largest warship and pride of the Royal Navy, steams majestically through the Swept Channel on 22 May, 1941. Having fuelled at the Scapa Flow naval base in Scotland, she steers clear of floats suspending torpedo and submarine nets, as she heads for open water and the North Sea. The crew of a naval cutter wave farewell as the mighty battleship departs upon what will prove to be her final voyage.

Less than 50 copies now available.

Signed by Lieutenant Ted Briggs RN (deceased)

Signed limited edition of 500 prints.

Image size 16 inches x 25 inches (41cm x 64cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

DHM1620. The Final Salvo - HMS Hood by Anthony Saunders.

HMS Hood readies to fire off a what proved to be the final salvo against the Bismarck before a shell from the German battleship penetrated the magazine of HMS Hood, tearing apart the British ship in an enormous explosion.

Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 19 inches x 12 inches (48cm x 31cm)


Website Price: £ 170.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £290.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £120




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo


The signature of Lieutenant Ted Briggs RN (deceased)

Lieutenant Ted Briggs RN (deceased)
*Signature Value : £50 (matted)

Albert Edward Pryke Briggs, MBE, was born on 1st March 1923 in Redcar, North Riding of Yorkshire. Joining the Royal Navy in 1938 at the age of 15, Ted completed his initial training on the HMS Ganges. 16 months later he was assigned to the HMS Hood, fulfilling a childhood dream of his. On July 20th 1939, Ted joined the ships company. A little over a month later, Britain went to war with Germany. During the time preceding the epic battle with the Bismarck, the Hood was busy patrolling the Atlantic and escorting various ships. Ted was aboard the Hood when she fell to Bismarck on 24th May 1941. After his survivors leave ended in June, Ted was posted to the HMS Mercury. The remainder of the War found Ted being posted to various other ships of the Royal Navy. Ted remained in the navy after the war and retired on February 2 . 1973. Sadly, Ted Briggs died 4th October 2008, aged 85.
Artist Details : Anthony Saunders
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Anthony Saunders


Anthony Saunders

Anthony Saunders must be one of the most outstanding naval and aviation artists around today. He has extraordinary skill in portraying scenes of aerial combat that took place before he was born. Although in his own words Anthony prefers the artistic side of painting war aircraft rather than the historic side, he will spend many hours researching a subject, making sure that it is technically correct in every detail before applying any oil to canvas. The results of this technical and artistic skill are easy to see in his paintings; breathtaking skyscapes graced with the machines of aerial warfare beautifully brought to life with the rich colour that is unique to oil paint. With this skill it is hardly surprising that Anthony also paints many subjects other than aviation; scenes from Crimea and Waterloo are a particular favourite. He is equally at home with landscapes and portraits.

More about Anthony Saunders
Artist Details : Simon Atack
Click here for a full list of all artwork by Simon Atack


Simon Atack

Although Simon became a full-time artist after leaving the RAF in 1985, he first began painting when his mother bought him a box of oil paints and an easel when he was just six years of age! He cannot recall a time when he was not painting in the intervening years, all the time honing his drawing and painting skills whilst accepting commissions from various Commanding Officers! Simon learned to fly, soloing in a Piper Tomahawk, experience which, he believes, gives him an empathy and feel for aircraft and aircrew you could not get in any other way. Unlike just about any other professional military artist, Simon is almost as much at home on the sea as in the air. His maritime-based paintings reflect his personal knowledge of the sea, ships and the often-unpredictable marine environment. Researching new aircraft and concepts for his next painting, and then getting stuck into the actual painting of a new picture he has first to see in his head, is what really excites and motivates Simon and he wouldn’t have it any other way. Now firmly established as one of the top aviation artists in the world, collectors are always eagerly awaiting Simon’s original paintings and Limited Edition Prints. Simon works from his studio in the beautiful county of Buckinghamshire, England.

More about Simon Atack

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