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DHM2185. Farewell the Hood by Simon Atack. <p> HMS Hood, Britains largest warship and pride of the Royal Navy, steams majestically through the Swept Channel on 22 May, 1941. Having fuelled at the Scapa Flow naval base in Scotland, she steers clear of floats suspending torpedo and submarine nets, as she heads for open water and the North Sea. The crew of a naval cutter wave farewell as the mighty battleship departs upon what will prove to be her final voyage. <p><b>Less than 50 copies now available.<b><p> Signed by <a href=profiles.php?SigID=493>Lieutenant Ted Briggs RN</a> (deceased) <p> Signed limited edition of 500 prints.  <p>Image size 16 inches x 25 inches (41cm x 64cm)
DHM1346.  HMS Hood Passing Under the Forth Rail Bridge by Ivan Berryman. <p> HMS Hood passes beneath the forth Bridge on her way to Rosyth during one of her many visits to the Firth in the 1930s.  the cruiser HMS Norfolk lies at anchor in the middle distance. <b><p> Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. <p> Image size 25 inches x 15 inches (64cm x 38cm)
DHM378D. HMS Hood Passing Gibraltar by Brian Wood. <p>The pride of the Royal Navy, HMS Hood, passes Gibraltar on her way to join HMS Prince of Wales at Scapa Flow and onto her short and tragic engagement with the German battleship Bismarck.<b><p> Unsigned edition. <p> Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)
B115.  HMS Hood Engages Bismarck by Ivan Berryman.<p>The moment shortly after dawn on 24th May 1941 when HMS Hood, in company with HMS Prince of Wales, opens fire on the Bismarck, setting in motion one of the greatest sea dramas the world had seen. <b><p> Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.  <p>Image size 12 inches x 7 inches (31cm x 18cm)

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  Website Price: £ 180.00  

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HMS Hood Print Pack.

PCK1571. HMS Hood Print Pack by Ivan Berryman and Simon Atack.

Naval Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM2185. Farewell the Hood by Simon Atack.

HMS Hood, Britains largest warship and pride of the Royal Navy, steams majestically through the Swept Channel on 22 May, 1941. Having fuelled at the Scapa Flow naval base in Scotland, she steers clear of floats suspending torpedo and submarine nets, as she heads for open water and the North Sea. The crew of a naval cutter wave farewell as the mighty battleship departs upon what will prove to be her final voyage.

Less than 50 copies now available.

Signed by Lieutenant Ted Briggs RN (deceased)

Signed limited edition of 500 prints.

Image size 16 inches x 25 inches (41cm x 64cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

DHM1346. HMS Hood Passing Under the Forth Rail Bridge by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Hood passes beneath the forth Bridge on her way to Rosyth during one of her many visits to the Firth in the 1930s. the cruiser HMS Norfolk lies at anchor in the middle distance.

Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 25 inches x 15 inches (64cm x 38cm)


Item #3 - Click to view individual item

DHM378D. HMS Hood Passing Gibraltar by Brian Wood.

The pride of the Royal Navy, HMS Hood, passes Gibraltar on her way to join HMS Prince of Wales at Scapa Flow and onto her short and tragic engagement with the German battleship Bismarck.

Unsigned edition.

Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)


Item #4 - Click to view individual item

B115. HMS Hood Engages Bismarck by Ivan Berryman.

The moment shortly after dawn on 24th May 1941 when HMS Hood, in company with HMS Prince of Wales, opens fire on the Bismarck, setting in motion one of the greatest sea dramas the world had seen.

Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 7 inches (31cm x 18cm)


Website Price: £ 180.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £359.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £179




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo


The signature of Lieutenant Ted Briggs RN (deceased)

Lieutenant Ted Briggs RN (deceased)
*Signature Value : £50 (matted)

Albert Edward Pryke Briggs, MBE, was born on 1st March 1923 in Redcar, North Riding of Yorkshire. Joining the Royal Navy in 1938 at the age of 15, Ted completed his initial training on the HMS Ganges. 16 months later he was assigned to the HMS Hood, fulfilling a childhood dream of his. On July 20th 1939, Ted joined the ships company. A little over a month later, Britain went to war with Germany. During the time preceding the epic battle with the Bismarck, the Hood was busy patrolling the Atlantic and escorting various ships. Ted was aboard the Hood when she fell to Bismarck on 24th May 1941. After his survivors leave ended in June, Ted was posted to the HMS Mercury. The remainder of the War found Ted being posted to various other ships of the Royal Navy. Ted remained in the navy after the war and retired on February 2 . 1973. Sadly, Ted Briggs died 4th October 2008, aged 85.

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